Source Countries For “Temporary” Workers: 2004-2013

Below is some significant data on temporary foreign workers (TFW) from 1994 to 2013. (See archive). In fairness, the totals differ somewhat from the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament. Perhaps, the methods of calculation weren’t the same.

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

Despite what many think, LEGAL immigration into Canada is actually a much larger threat than illegal aliens, given the true scale of the replacement that is happening. What was founded as a European (British) colony is becoming unrecognizable due to forced demographic changes. There are also social, economic, environmental and voting changes to consider. See this Canadian series, and the UN programs for more detail. Politicians, the media, and so-called “experts” have no interest in coming clean on this.

CLICK HERE, for UN Genocide Prevention/Punishment Convention.
CLICK HERE, for Barcelona Declaration & Kalergi Plan.
CLICK HERE, for UN Kalergi Plan (population replacement).
CLICK HERE, for UN replacement efforts since 1974.
CLICK HERE, for tracing steps of UN replacement agenda.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

There’s also the issue that “temporary” workers and students often don’t leave when their visas expire. Canada offers many pathways to extend their stays, and there is little in the way of enforcement.

Aside from all the official totals, there are 3 “temporary” programs that are worth mentioning. These lead to hundreds of thousands of foreigners entering Canada each year, and most with some option to extend. There are also pathways to permanent residence. These are:

  • Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP)
  • International Mobility Programme (IMP)
  • International Students

Let’s look at a decade worth of data, and see where the bulk of these people are coming from. Of course, this should be pretty obvious. This is on page 17.

Starting with the TFWP: it should be apparent from the data provided that the Philippines is consistently at the top of the TFWP.

2. Temporary Foreign Worker Program Source Countries: 2004-2013

Note: these figures are considerably less than the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament. It’s unclear why, but perhaps this doesn’t encompass all portions. In any event, we can at least see where people are coming from.

TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2004
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 13,812 37.1 1
United States 4,423 11.9 2
India 2,714 7.3 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 2,636 7.1 4
Japan 1,125 3.0 5
France 1,095 2.9 6
South Africa 918 2.5 7
Australia 847 2.3 8
China 537 1.4 9
South Korea 513 1.4 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 28,620 76.0
TOTAL — OTHERS 8,602 24.0
GRAND TOTAL 37,222 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2005
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 16,561 38.1 1
United States 4,721 10.9 2
India 3,560 8.2 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,179 7.3 4
France 1,233 2.8 5
Japan 1,042 2.4 6
South Africa 972 2.2 7
Australia 867 2.0 8
Germany 827 1.9 9
China 642 1.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 33,004 76.0
TOTAL — OTHERS 10,415 24.0
GRAND TOTAL 43,419 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2006
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 21,362 39.5 1
United States 4,924 9.1 2
India 4,249 7.9 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,568 6.6 4
France 1,509 2.8 5
Germany 1,225 2.3 6
Japan 1,055 2.0 7
South Korea 1,020 1.9 8
Australia 984 1.8 9
Thailand 847 1.6 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 40,743 75.5
TOTAL — OTHERS 13,275 24.5
GRAND TOTAL 54,018 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2007
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 32,451 41.4 1
India 6,250 8.0 2
United States 5,456 6.9 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 4,402 5.6 4
China 2,447 3.1 5
Mexico 2,337 3.0 6
France 1,928 2.5 7
Germany 1,905 2.4 8
South Korea 1,531 2.0 9
Australia 1,234 1.6 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 59,941 76.5
TOTAL — OTHERS 18,420 23.5
GRAND TOTAL 78,361 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2008
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 46,816 42.3 1
India 8,333 7.5 2
United States 6,305 5.7 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 5,812 5.3 4
Mexico 4,819 4.4 5
South Korea 2,922 2.6 6
Germany 2,743 2.5 7
China 2,727 2.7 8
France 2,309 2.1 9
Japan 1,684 1.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 78,165 70.7
TOTAL — OTHERS 32,464 29.3
GRAND TOTAL 110,629 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2009
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 51,019 45.3 1
India 8,287 7.4 2
United States 6,242 5.5 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 5,657 5.0 4
Mexico 4,467 4.0 5
South Korea 3,101 2.8 6
France 2,435 2.2 7
Germany 2,349 2.1 8
China 2,239 2.0 9
Japan 1,523 1.4 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 87,319 77.6
TOTAL — OTHERS 25,266 22.4
GRAND TOTAL 112,585 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2010
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 44,401 50.8 1
India 7,338 8.0 2
United States 5,044 5.5 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 4,165 4.5 4
Mexico 2,747 3.0 5
France 2,409 2.6 6
South Korea 2,305 2.5 7
China 1,717 1.9 8
Guatemala 1,468 1.6 9
Germany 1,378 1.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 72,972 79.2
TOTAL — OTHERS 19,182 20.8
GRAND TOTAL 92,154 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2011
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 36,984 45.3 1
India 5,728 7.0 2
United States 4,937 6.1 3
Mexico 4,019 4.9 4
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,749 4.6 5
France 2,664 3.3 6
South Korea 2,210 2.8 7
China 1,568 1.9 8
Guatemala 1,523 1.9 9
Jamaica 1,188 1.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 64,570 79.1
TOTAL — OTHERS 17,016 20.9
GRAND TOTAL 81,586 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2012
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 36,501 42.1 1
India 6,520 7.5 2
United States 5,741 6.6 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 4,052 4.7 4
Mexico 2,983 3.4 5
France 2,924 3.4 6
South Korea 2,517 2.9 7
Guatemala 2,036 2.3 8
China 1,632 1.9 9
Thailand 1,403 1.6 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 66,039 76.2
TOTAL — OTHERS 20,671 23.8
GRAND TOTAL 86,710 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2013
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 40,655 39.0 1
India 7,930 7.6 2
United States 5,861 5.6 3
United Kingdom 4,941 4.7 4
Mexico 4,226 4.1 5
South Korea 3,369 3.5 6
France 3,230 3.1 7
Guatemala 2,504 2.4 8
Jamaica 2,234 2.1 9
Ireland 2,078 2.0 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 77,028 74.0
TOTAL — OTHERS 27,132 26.0
GRAND TOTAL 104,160 100

Of course, this is just a snapshot from a decade, but it shows the patterns. It’s also worth noting that the TFWP has many pathways to extend visas, or to transition in permanent residents.

A quick look will show that Canada went from 37,000 or so visas in 2004, to issuing 104,000 in 2013. That has not gone on unnoticed.

3. Changes Made To Temporary Foreign Worker Program

This point had been made before, but is important to go over again. (See archive). In 2013/2014, the “Conservative” Government of Stephen Harper faced backlash for how many TFWs were coming into the Canada, and the effect of reducing wages.

Instead of making serious cuts — as was implied — the Government split up the program, and bumped up the number of people who could come under the International Mobility Programme. This had the effect of appearing (on paper) that significant reductions had occurred, but was really a sleight-of-hand.

The International Mobility Programme will be covered in greater detail later, but here is some background information on it.

And sure, there’s always the claim that immigration and temporary workers will grow the economy. Yes, but which economies? Perhaps many aren’t up to date on some of the statistics surrounding remittances sent abroad from Canada. Or sent globally.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

4. Documents Provided By Canadian Government

(A.0) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/index.html
(A.1) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1966.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1966
(A.2) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1967.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1967
(A.3) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1968.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1968
(A.4) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1969.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1969
(A.5) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1970.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1970
(A.6) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1971.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1971
(A.7) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1972.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1972
(A.8) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1973.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1973
(A.9) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1974.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1974
(A.10) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1975.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1975
(A.11) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1976.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1976
(A.12) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1977.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1977
(A.13) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1978.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1978
(A.14) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1979.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1979
(A.15) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1980.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1980
(A.16) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1981.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1981
(A.17) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1982.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1982
(A.18) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1983.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1983
(A.19) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1984.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1984
(A.20) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1985.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1985
(A.21) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1986.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1986
(A.22) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1987.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1987
(A.23) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1988.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1988
(A.24) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1989.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1989
(A.25) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1990.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1990
(A.26) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1991.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1991
(A.27) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1992.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1992
(A.28) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1993.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1993
(A.29) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1994.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1994
(A.30) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1995.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1995
(A.31) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1996.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1996

(B.0) https://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.505817/publication.html
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/reports-statistics/statistics-open-data.html
(B.1) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/cic/MP43-333-1999-eng.pdf
Canada Immigration Facts And Figures 1998
(B.2) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/MP43-333-2000E.pdf
(B.3) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2015/cic/Ci1-8-10-2013-eng.pdf
Temporary Migration In Canada 2004-2013

(C.0) Parliament Report Index
http://archive.is/vwM6G
(C.1) 2004 Report to Canadian Parliament
2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.2) 2005 Report to Canadian Parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.3) 2006 Report to Canadian Parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.4) 2007 Report to Canadian Parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.5) 2008 Report to Canadian Parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.6) 2009 report to Canadian Parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.7) 2010 Report to Canadian Parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.8) 2011 Report to Canadian Parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.9) 2012 Report to Canadian Parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.10) 2013 Report to Canadian Parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.11) 2014 Report to Canadian Parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.12) 2015 Report to Canadian Parliament
2015.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.13) 2016 Report to Canadian Parliament
2016.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.14) 2017 Report to Canadian Parliament
2017.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15) 2018 Report to CDN Parliament
2018.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15.2) 2019-2021 Supplemental Report
http://archive.is/onyev
(C.16) 2019 Report to Canadian Parliament
2019.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.17) 2020 Report to Canadian Parliament
2020.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.18) 2021 Report to Canadian Parliament
2021.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament

Millions Got Rental Subsidy, CERS, Imposed Masks & Vaccine Passports

This article focuses on CERS, the Canada Emergency Rental Subsidy. Unlike the wage program, it doesn’t appear that there is a database to just search names. That said, we can still get some information from the statistics that are compiled.

To start with the obvious: some 2 million applications have been approved. Considering that Canada is (supposedly) a country of 38 or 39 million people, that would suggest that a majority of businesses here got something.

From the data presented, it appears that the median (50% above, 50% below) amount given would be a little over $1,500. Seems to be pretty cheap to sell out for.

INDUSTRY APPROVALS
Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing & Hunting 860 $1,393,000 5,710
Mining, quarrying, and oil and gas extraction 180 $452,000 540
Utilities
Construction 2,670 $2,410,000 3,230
Manufacturing 3,470 $4,781,000 4,450
Wholesale Trade 2,530 $2,815,000 3,780
Retail Trade 7,780 $7,020,000 11,680
Transportation & Warehousing 3,210 $3,681,000 3,930
Information & Cultural Industries 800 $1,181,000 1,640
Finance & Insurance 700 $904,000 1,510
Real Estate & Rental & Leasing 1,960 $2,510,000 2,750
Professional, Scientific & Technical Services 5,030 $4,305,000 6,190
Management of Companies & Enterprises 140 $264,000 310
Administrative Support, Waste Management & Remediation Services 2,880 $3,004,000 3,740
Education Services 2,150 $2,419,000 2,600
Health Care & Social Assistance 3,810 $2,424,000 4,790
Arts, Entertainment & Recreation 2,620 $3,874,000 3,370
Accommodation & Food Services 13,690 $17,368,000 16,200
Other Services, except Public Administration 9,530 $6,184,000 11,460
Public Administration
Not Assigned 4,370 $4,643,000 4,910
Total – Period 14 68,400 $71,645,000 92,800
Total since launch 2,001,670 $7,557,399,000

Wonder why so many companies are willing to go along with vaccine passports and mask mandates? It’s reasonable to assume that the handouts, which include CERS, played a large role in that. This is how the Government is able to keep its hands — somewhat — clean. If they don’t impose mandates, but simply subsidize businesses to do it, then it’s viewed as private enterprise.

This continues the list of institutions that are getting funded to shill the “pandemic” narrative. These include: restaurants and hotels, political parties, law firms, more law firms, churches, trucking associations, chambers of commerce, financial institutions, the publishing industry, and gyms, just to name a few of them.

Remember: things often don’t make sense until you see the entire picture. This site tries to show you as much of it as possible, and money seems to always be the driving factor.

(1) https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/cra-arc/serv-info/tax/business/topics/cers/statistics/cers_tbl2.pdf
(2) Canada Emergency Rental Subsidy
(3) https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/wage-rent-subsidies/emergency-rent-subsidy/cers-statistics.html
(4) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/cews/srch/pub/bscSrch
(5) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/srch/pub/dsplyBscSrch?request_locale=en
(6) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/
(7) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/advSrch

(A.1) Hotel, Restaurant Groups Getting Wage/Rental Subsidies
(A.2) Liberals, Conservatives, NDP All Getting Bailout Money
(A.3) Lawyers, Bar Associations Receiving CEWS Money
(A.4) Conflicting Out? Lawyers Getting More Than Just CEWS
(A.5) Churches Are Charities, Getting CEWS, Subsidies & Promoting Vaccines
(A.6) Trucking Alliance Grants Raising many Eyebrows
(A.7) Chambers Of Commerce Subsidized By Canadians, Want Open Borders
(A.8) Banks, Credit Unions, Media Outlets All Getting CEWS
(A.9) Publishing Industry Subsidized By Taxpayer Money
(A.10) Gyms, Fitness Centres Getting CEWS As They Mandate Masks, Vaxx Passports

(B.1) Unifor, Media, In Bed With Gov’t, $595M
(B.2) Government Subsidizes Media To Ensure Positive Coverage
(B.3) Postmedia Subsidies/Connections, Lack Of Real Journalism
(B.4) Latest “Pandemic Bucks” Grants In 2021, Lorrie Goldstein
(B.5) Nordstar; Torstar; Metroland Media; Subsidies & Monopoly
(B.6) Aberdeen Publishing Takes Handouts, Ignores Real Issues
(B.7) More Periodicals Taking Grants, Parroting Gov’t Narrative
(B.8) Tri-City News, LMP Pulls Bonnie Henry Article; Pandemic Bucks
(B.9) Black Press Group; Media Outlet Doxing Of Convoy Donors
(B.10) Subsidized Fact-Check Outlets Run By Political Operatives
(B.11) Digital Citizen Contribution Program: Funds To Combat “Misinformation”
(B.12) Counter Intelligence “Disinformation Prevention” Groups Are Charities
(B.13) CIVIX, More Grants To Combat “Disinformation” In 2021, Domestic, Foreign
(B.14) PHAC Supporting #ScienceUpFirst Counter Intel Effort
(B.15) Rockefeller Spends $13.5 To Combat Misinformation
(B.16) Media, Banks, CU, Getting CDA Emergency Wage Subsidies (CEWS)
(B.17) John Tory’s Sister Board Member At Bell; CEWS; Subsidies

(C.1) Media, Facebook, Google, Tech Collusion To Create “Trust” Networks
(C.2) CommonTrust, Commons Project, WEF, Rockefeller, Health Passes
(C.3) C2PA; Project Origin; Content Authenticity Initiative; CBC-BBC-Microsoft
(C.4) Public Media Alliance, Global Task Force, Brussels Declaration
(C.5) Institute For Strategic Dialogue: Govt/NGO Funded Counter-Intelligence
(C.6) Institute For Strategic Dialogue: Open Source Intelligence Gathering

Chambers Of Commerce: Collecting Subsidies While Calling For Open Borders

According to the CEWS Registry, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy has been handed out to some 235 institutions that have “Chamber of Commerce” as part of their name. That should alarm people, that hundreds of organizations that claim to promote business are getting handouts from Ottawa — or rather, taxpayers.

The Chambers of Commerce are just part of a long list of institutions that are getting funded to shill the “pandemic” narrative. These include: restaurants and hotels, political parties, law firms, more law firms, churches, and trucking associations, to name a few.

While it would be unrealistic to do a profile on all 235 organizations, let’s take a look at one: The Canadian Chamber of Commerce.

Description of the organization’s activities
Founded in 1925, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce is the nation’s largest business association, representing small and large firms from every sector and region in Canada. The Canadian Chamber is a network of 420 community chambers and boards of trade across Canada, in addition to individual corporate members and over 80 trade and professional organizations. The total membership exceeds 192,000. It is dedicated to the promotion and development of a strong economy. The chamber monitors federal and international issues, solicits the views of the Canadian business community and communicates them to policymakers in Ottawa and internationally. Headquartered in Ottawa, it also has staff in Toronto, Montreal and Calgary.

This is how the group describes its activities.

Instead of calling for people to be able to run their businesses freely, and with minimal interference, the Chamber of Commerce parrots the line that vaccines and rapid tests are the quickest way back to normal. On the surface, it looks like they are playing along because of the financial incentives provided. More on that coming up.

The “wins” they brag about include getting CEWS and CERS extended. CERS is the Canada Emergency Rental Subsidy which is available for businesses. This “business” group also brags about getting the hiring subsidy created, so that taxpayers help fund new employees.

While this organization does receive private donations, it undeniably is getting Government handouts as well. In fact, this has been happening for many years.

GOVERNMENT BRANCH SOURCE YEAR AMOUNT
Bank of Canada 2019 $1,375.00
Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) 2015 $5,000.00
Canada Foundation for Innovation 2020 $2,300.00
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) 2021 $5,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2014 $10,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2015 $6,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2017 $6,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2018 $1,900.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2020 $10,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2021 $30,000.00
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) 2020 $850,623.60
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) 2021 $118,464.75
Competition Bureau Canada (COBU) 2016 $1,800.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2018 $3,400.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2019 $74,496.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2020 $22,451.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2021 $12,180
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2017 $56,548.68
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2018 $29,600.00
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2019 $2,500.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2014 $37,500.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2015 $29,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2016 $42,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2017 $63,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2018 $65,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2019 $65,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2020 $51,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2021 $79,100.00
Farm Credit Canada (FCC) 2018 $2,500.00
FedDev Agency for Southern Ontario 2018 $2,300.00
FedDev Agency for Southern Ontario 2020 $2,300.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2017 $1,900.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2018 $1,900.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2019 $2,300.00
Health Canada (HC) 2021 $4,947,978.19
Industry Canada 2014 $1,500.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2015 $1,800.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2016 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2018 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2019 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2020 $530,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2021 $2,300.00
Montreal Port Authority 2020 $5,000.00
Montreal Port Authority 2021 $5,000.00
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) 2015 $132,300.00
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) 2017 $22,122.12
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2014 $1,500.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2015 $1,800.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2016 $1,800.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2017 $1,900.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2019 $2,000.00
Office of the Procurement Ombudsman (OPO) 2020 $2,300.00
Office of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman 2018 $2,300.00
Ontario Federation of Agriculture 2020 $5,000.00
Port Alberni Port Authority 2016 $10,000.00
Prince Rupert Port Authority 2016 $4,500.00
Public Works and Government Services Canada 2014 $1,500.00
Royal Canadian Mint 2014 $2,500.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2014 $32,500.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2015 $10,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2016 $43,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2017 $65,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2018 $50,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2019 $40,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2020 $40,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2021 $57,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2016 $7,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2017 $18,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2019 $10,000.00
VIA Rail Canada 2020 $10,000.00
VIA Rail Canada 2021 $15,000.00

You’d be forgiven for thinking that these were really Communists. Now, what is the Chamber of Commerce getting for itself? The listings should scare you. Keep in mind, that other Chambers of Commerce are likely also receiving money at the local level.

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce has been getting handouts going back many years. The CEWS is really just the least of it. It would also be interesting to know what the conditions were for that nearly $5 million they received from Health Canada.

The Chamber doesn’t appear to call for the end to martial law restrictions. Instead, they lobby for more handouts in order to cope with lockdowns. For a business orientated group, they seem completely okay with Government interference and restrictions.

There also appears to be no issue with policies like vaccine passports. After all, if Canadians don’t want to play along, they can just be replaced by TFWs who took the shots as a condition of employment.

This group also calls for drastically increased immigration, and more ways to remain in Canada. They also support free trade which will see industries outsourced based on cost. Think about how this plays out in the long term.

[1] Flood Canada with more people, driving up demand for work
[2] Support trade deals which reduce the supply of available work

Never mind the social impacts of importing large numbers from very different backgrounds, or the culture clash that will result. It appears these business groups don’t care about such things.

If you think it’s bad now, the agenda from a few years back is even worse. Or perhaps it’s just more open about what they really wanted then.

BORDER CROSSINGS – Beyond the Borders Initiative, with respect to implementation of the action plan items.
BORDER CROSSINGS – with respect to the development of a new International Crossing between Windsor and Detroit.
FREE TRADE AGREEMENTS – Promote balanced free trade agreements for Canada with Europe, India Japan and Korea. Promote Canada’s participation in the Trans-Pacific partnership and in the Trade in Services Agreement
IMMIGRATION – Expedited application process with regard to giving priority to applicants who possess skills in short supply in Canada and processing their applications within 6-12 months.
IMMIGRATION – Foreign Credentials Recognition Program with regard to working with the provinces/territories and business community to develop national accreditation standards to evaluate foreign credentials, professional and trade qualifications, and certification in regulated and non-regulated occupations that reflect employers’ needs
IMMIGRATION: Changes intended to attract and retain international students with respect to work permits, applications for permanent residency, and processing times for applications.
IMMIGRATION: Changes to increase the number of economic immigrants to this country to double the current rate. Renegotiation and signing of new memoranda of understanding with each of the provinces and territories to increase provincial caps for Provincial Nominee Programs. Adequate staffing of local Citizenship and Immigration Canada offices to meet demand and alleviate the labour market shortages.
IMMIGRATION: Regional strategy for settlement needs and at levels of service to ensure access to skilled workers in all regions of the country.
International Trade: Expanding trade and investment links with developing countries.
Labour: Ensuring that any changes to the Canada Labour Code are implemented only if they address a real problem or result in improvement for these employers, their employee and/or the Canadians they serve.
Labour: Asking the federal government, specifically the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, to work with the Canadian private sector to identify ways to increase long-term formal employment opportunities for the poor in developing countries, and facilitate the availability of financial institutional products and services, including microfinance, to stimulate job creation for the poor

The above section includes items from 2014 (#36 on their profile with the Lobbying Registry). The Canadian Chamber of Commerce (and presumably all chapters) support virtually open borders as it ensures ready access to an endless supply of cheaper labour.

Put bluntly, Canadian taxpayers are helping to finance groups calling for outsourcing of industries, and the importing of a new work force for what’s left. It not only causes havoc with jobs, but drives down wages for the ones that remain.

Now, about those 235 groups receiving the CEWS:

  • 1000 ISLANDS GANANOQUE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ABBOTSFORD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Aboriginal Chamber Of Commerce – Grand Rapids
  • AIRDRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ALBERNI VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ALBERTA CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
  • ANNAPOLIS VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • AURORA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BAFFIN REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BANCROFT & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BATHURST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BATTLEFORDS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BEAUMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • BONNYVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • BOW VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • BRACEBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRANDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRAZIL-CANADA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRIGHTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BROCKVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BURLINGTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BURNS LAKE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA DELL’ ONTARIO/ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF ONTARIO
  • CAMPBELL RIVER AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMROSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CANADIAN GERMAN CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE INC
  • Canadian Women’s Chamber of Commerce
  • CASTLEGAR & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CENTRE WELLINGTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BRANTFORD-BRANT
  • CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SERVING COQUITLAM, PORT COQUITLAM PORT MOODY
  • Chamber of Marine Commerce CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE MARITIME
  • Chambre de commerce Canada-Floride/ Chamber of commerce Canada-florida
  • Chambre de commerce de l’Est de Montréal Eastern Montreal Chamber of Commerce
  • CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE ET D’INDUSTRIE DE BÉCANCOUR NICOLET-YAMASKA / BECANCOUR NICOLET-YAMASKA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHARLOTTETOWN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHATHAM-KENT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHETWYND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHILLIWACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CLOVERDALE DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Coboconk, Norland & Area Chamber of Commerce
  • COLD LAKE REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • COLUMBIA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CORNWALL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • COWICHAN LAKE DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CRANBROOK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DAWSON CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • DAWSON CREEK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DELTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DRUMHELLER AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DRYDEN DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DUNCAN-COWICHAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EAST GWILLIMBURY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EAST HANTS AND DISTRICTS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Eastern Prince Edward Island Chamber of Commerce Inc.
  • EDMONTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EDMUNDSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE/LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE LA REGION D’EDMUNDSTON INC
  • ESTEVAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FENELON FALLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FERNIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT FRANCES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT MACLEOD AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT MCMURRAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT NELSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT SASKATCHEWAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT ST JOHN AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FREDERICTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GANDER & AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC
  • GEORGINA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GIBSONS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRANDE PRAIRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRAVENHURST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER BARRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER KINGSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER LANGLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER NANAIMO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER NIAGARA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER OSHAWA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER PETERBOROUGH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce
  • GREATER SUDBURY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER VERNON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER VICTORIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRIMSBY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GUANGDONG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (CANADA)
  • GUELPH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALIBURTON HIGHLANDS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALIFAX CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALTON HILLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HUMBOLDT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CORP.
  • HUNTSVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • INDO-CANADA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • INNISFAIL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN CANADA – WEST/CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA IN CANADA – OVEST
  • JASPER PARK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KAMLOOPS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KAWARTHA LAKES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE-EASTERN REGION
  • KELOWNA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KENORA AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KENSINGTON AND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KIMBERLEY BAVARIAN SOCIETY
  • KINDERSLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KITIMAT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE GASPE – /GASPÉ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE MANIWAKI-THE MANIWAKI CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE ITALIENNE AU CANADA. ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN CANADA CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA IN CANADA
  • LA CRETE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LAB WEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LABRADOR NORTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • LAC LA BICHE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Lacombe and District Chamber of Commerce
  • LADYSMITH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LAKE COUNTRY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LEAMINGTON DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LEDUC REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LETHBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LINCOLN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LINDSAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LLOYDMINSTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MEDICINE HAT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MILTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MOOSE JAW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MORDEN AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MOUNT PEARL PARADISE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MUSKOKA LAKES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NELSON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NEW WESTMINSTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NEWMARKET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NORTH BAY AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Northumberland Central Chamber of Commerce
  • NWT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • OAKVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ORILLIA AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ORO-MEDONTE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • OWEN SOUND & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PARKSVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEACE RIVER BOARD OF TRADE AND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEACHLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEMBERTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PENTICTON AND WINE COUNTRY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PLACENTIA AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PONOKA & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • PORT HARDY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PORT HOPE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • POWELL RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PRAIRIE SKY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • PRINCE GEORGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • QUESNEL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • QUINTE WEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RADIUM HOT SPRINGS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RED DEER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • REGINA & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RENFREW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • REVELSTOKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RICHMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RUSSELL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SALT SPRING ISLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SARNIA LAMBTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SASKATCHEWAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SAUGEEN SHORES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SAULT STE MARIE AND DISTRICT OF CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SELKIRK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC
  • SHERWOOD PARK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SICAMOUS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SIMCOE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SMITHERS DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SMITHS FALLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOCIETY OF THE MORINVILLE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOUTH SURREY AND WHITE ROCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Springfield Chamber of Commerce Inc.
  • SQUAMISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
  • ST. ALBERT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • ST PAUL & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • ST THOMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • STONY PLAIN & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • STRATHROY AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SUMMERLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SUSSEX AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • SWIFT CURRENT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SYLVAN LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE ARMSTRONG-SPALLUMCHEEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE BRITISH COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CALGARY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA
  • THE EDSON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce
  • THE GREATER MONCTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE GREATER SUMMERSIDE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE HAMILTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE MACKENZIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE MANITOBA CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
  • THE MOUNT FOREST DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PARRY SOUND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PAS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PERTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE SAANICH PENINSULA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE TABER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • The Winkler and District Chamber of Commerce
  • THE WINNIPEG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THUNDER BAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TILLSONBURG DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TIMMINS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TOBERMORY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TOFINO-LONG BEACH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Trail Chamber of Commerce
  • TRENT HILLS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TRURO AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • UCLUELET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VAUGHAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VEGREVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VERMILION CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WASKESIU CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WELLAND/PELHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST PRINCE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST SHORE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST VANCOUVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEYBURN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITBY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITCHURCH STOUFFVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITECOURT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITEHORSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WIARTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WILLIAMS LAKE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Windsor-Essex Regional Chamber of Commerce
  • WOODSTOCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YARMOUTH AND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YELLOWKNIFE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YORKTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Do you get it now? Your tax dollars are being used to support these “Chambers of Commerce”. These groups lobby Federal and Provincial Governments to spend even more money propping up businesses which impose mask and vaccine rules. They also support the open border agenda to mass import people who will work for less, and who are more receptive to taking experimental shots.

In many ways, this comes across as a protection racket. These groups push for certain “safety” grants and measures for their members, but always ones that profit them as well.

(1) https://chamber.ca/
(2) https://chamber.ca/campaign/business-led-recovery/
(3) https://chamber.ca/advocacy/wins-for-canadian-business/
(4) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/cews/srch/pub/bscSrch
(5) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?regId=812012&cno=15787#regStart

(A) https://canucklaw.ca/media-subsidies-and-govt-financing/
(B) https://canucklaw.ca/media-controlled-opposition/
(C) https://canucklaw.ca/groups-calling-for-vaccine-passports-heavily-subsidized-by-government/
(D) https://canucklaw.ca/trudeau-using-taxpayer-money-to-subsidize-opposition-parties-liberals-too/
(E) https://canucklaw.ca/law-firms-bar-associations-receiving-canada-emergency-wage-subsidy-cews/
(F) https://canucklaw.ca/conflicting-out-its-not-just-cews-that-the-lawyers-are-receiving/
(G) https://canucklaw.ca/following-the-money-why-are-churches-really-pushing-the-vaxx-agenda
(H) https://canucklaw.ca/canadian-trucking-alliance-raising-lots-of-questions-lately/

Canadian Trucking Alliance Raising Lots Of Questions Lately

Underway right now a very, VERY large group of truck drivers is heading to Ottawa to protest mandatory vaccinations and to demand that policy be rescinded. Now, do their associations have their backs? Not in the slightest.

The Canadian Trucking Alliance made waves recently when they condemned the planned “convoy to Ottawa”. From their own statement:

The vast majority of the Canadian trucking industry is vaccinated with the overall industry vaccination rate among truck drivers closely mirroring that of the general public. Accordingly, most of our nation’s hard-working truck drivers are continuing to move cross-border and domestic freight to ensure our economy continues to function.

The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) does not support and strongly disapproves of any protests on public roadways, highways, and bridges. CTA believes such actions – especially those that interfere with public safety – are not how disagreements with government policies should be expressed. Members of the trucking industry who want to publicly express displeasure over government policies can choose to hold an organized, lawful event on Parliament Hill or contact their local MP. What is not acceptable is disrupting the motoring public on highways and commerce at the border.

“The Government of Canada and the United States have now made being vaccinated a requirement to cross the border. This regulation is not changing so, as an industry, we must adapt and comply with this mandate,” said CTA president Stephen Laskowski. “The only way to cross the border, in a commercial truck or any other vehicle, is to get vaccinated.”

Instead of supporting the people who pay their salaries, the C.T.A. makes the suggestion to “call your Member of Parliament”. That’s interesting, considering that all parties are pretty much on board with the same thing. Like so many unions and association groups before, the C.T.A. seems content to throw the workers under the bus. On the surface this is alarming.

The C.T.A does not exist in isolation. Provincial counterparts make up this group, giving it more political power, and ability to influence policy.

Another red flag is that several of the groups that make up the Canadian Trucking Alliance have been receiving CEWS, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy. This includes British Columbia, Alberta, and the Atlantic Provinces. Right there, loyalty to the members is tested against the best interests of their employees.

Yes, this is beating a dead horse, but plenty of industries are taking the blood money. This includes: restaurants and hotels, political parties, law firms, more law firms, and churches, to name a few.

In November 2020, the Manitoba Trucking Association received a $125,000 grant from the Western Economic Diversification Program. The stated goal was helping companies adapt to the “pandemic” circumstances in their businesses. Previously, they had taken $268,000 back in 2014. The Atlantic Provinces Trucking Associaton received $37,500 back in 2013 from the Federal Government.

In a move that should surprise no one, the C.T.A. regularly lobbies the Federal Government on a number of issues. Readers of this site should expect this. One item to note is immigration:

“Immigration – related to temporary foreign worker program and support for demand driven immigration allowances specific to assisting shortage of qualified truck drivers.”

While the C.T.A. is putting the screws to its own people, and supporting vaccine mandates, they are also calling on Ottawa to make it easier to import a replacement workforce. Presumably, the people coming into the country will only be able to as a condition of taking the shots (2 or 3 so far). The Saskatchewan Trucking Association — a member group — is also pushing to have an increase in immigration to import more truck drivers. So did their Ontario counterpart in 2019. What sort of picture are we getting here?

[1] Force Canadians out, or to retire, with mandatory medical procedure.
[2] Import new truckers who would be willing to work for less, and take the shots.

Unfortunately, this is hardly the only industry where this is happening.

If you think the trucking groups are only lobbying Federally, you would be very much mistaken. It continues on:

TIME GOVERNMENT BRANCH AMOUNT
2018 WorkSafeBC $1,826,134
2019 Employment and Social Development Canada $22,000
2019 Ministry of Transportation & Infrastructure $1,400,000
2019 Natural Resources Canada $20,000
2019 WorkSafeBC $1,393,716
2020-01-15 to 2021-12-31 WorkSafeBC $4,641,567
2020-03-31 to 2021-03-31 Transportation and Infrastructure $1,540,000

The British Columbia Trucking Association (which is part of C.T.A.) has regularly been receiving money both Provincial and Federal Governments. That may explain why there is no real opposition to forcing the truckers to take the experimental shots. In fact, C.T.A. put out a joint statement with Ottawa on the topic of vaccinating workers.

Why does the Canadian Trucking Alliance support mandatory vaccines, and object to the protests in Ottawa? Maybe, just maybe, their interests aren’t with the individual truckers. Perhaps, money does influence policy positions.

Taking a quick look through CEWS and other Federal grants, there are plenty of trucking companies who are receiving handouts as well. This would explain why so many are on board with vaccine mandates.

Instead of looking out for workers, the C.T.A. touts the advantage of a projected driver shortage claiming it will ultimately drive up wages. Sure, except for the people who were let go.

(1) https://cantruck.ca/canadian-trucking-alliance-statement-to-those-engaged-in-road-border-protests/
(2) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/srch/pub/advncdSrch
(3) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/wd-deo,GC-WD-DEO-2020-2021-Q3-1103,current
(4) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/wd-deo,GC-WD-DEO-2013-2014-Q4-00142,current
(5) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/acoa-apeca,276-2013-2014-Q1-00004,current
(6) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?cno=622&regId=916231#regStart
(7) https://www.lobbyistsregistrar.bc.ca/app/secure/orl/lrs/do/vwRg?cno=596&regId=56562530
(8) https://www.sasklobbyistregistry.ca/search-the-registry/registration-details/?id=a541fccd-1c72
(9) https://www.canada.ca/en/transport-canada/news/2022/01/declaration-commune-des-ministresalghabra-oregan-et-qualtrough-et-du-president-de-lalliance-canadienne-du-camionnage.html
(10) https://cantruck.ca/vaccine-mandate-leading-to-better-driver-pay-carrier/
(11) https://ctacanada.com/quality-service/

(A) https://canucklaw.ca/media-subsidies-and-govt-financing/
(B) https://canucklaw.ca/media-controlled-opposition/
(C) https://canucklaw.ca/groups-calling-for-vaccine-passports-heavily-subsidized-by-government/
(D) https://canucklaw.ca/trudeau-using-taxpayer-money-to-subsidize-opposition-parties-liberals-too/
(E) https://canucklaw.ca/law-firms-bar-associations-receiving-canada-emergency-wage-subsidy-cews/
(F) https://canucklaw.ca/conflicting-out-its-not-just-cews-that-the-lawyers-are-receiving/
(G) https://canucklaw.ca/following-the-money-why-are-churches-really-pushing-the-vaxx-agenda

Ottawa Doling Out Grants For Development Of Artificial Intelligence, Job Market To Be Crushed

An issue that isn’t covered often enough is the role of automation and artificial intelligence on the labour market. While employment rates rise and fall, the prevalence of these new technologies is certain to have devastating effects on the amount of jobs available.

What happens when large numbers of people find that their fields no longer exist? What happens when professionals who have spent decades learning a trade or skill see it evaporate almost overnight? The long and short term effects of this are something essential to cover.

It should be noted that many who champion this next industrial revolution are also advocates of open borders and mass economic immigration. They also support so-called free trade, or globalization, which sees companies outsourced simply to reduce production costs. What happens when these are combined? In terms of supply and demand, this isn’t difficult to figure out.

[1] Continue high levels of immigration
[2] Outsource work to 3rd world to reduce costs (where possible)
[3] Slash available jobs and industries to work in locally

It gets even worse. Not only is this happening in Canada, but large amounts of taxpayer money are used to accelerate the collapse of the job market. The examples below are just a portion of what is being handed out under the title of “artificial intelligence”.

ORGANIZATION DATE AMOUNT
AbCellera Biologics Inc. Apr. 14, 2020 $175,631,000
AIMS Global Secretariat Aug. 26, 2020 $2,500,000
Alberta Machine Intelligence Institute Jul. 12, 2019 $2,750,000
Algolux Inc. Mar. 1, 2021 $667,000
AltaML Inc. Nov. 23, 2020 $1,000,000
Apollo Machine & Welding Ltd. Apr. 1, 2021 $581,500
Association des médecins vétérinaires practiciens Apr. 9, 2021 $998,456
Ayogo Health Inc. Oct. 2, 2018 $1,730,740
BoG of NorQuest Col & Concordia Uni Dec. 30, 2019 $1,150,000
CAE Inc. Jul. 16, 2018 $150,000,000
CAE Inc. Jan. 28, 2021 $190,000,000
Canadensys Aerospace Corporation Oct. 8, 2020 $2,498,664
Canadian Agri-Food Automation and Intelligence Network Inc. Jul. 6, 2020 $49,500,000
Canadian Agri-Food Automation and Intelligence Network Inc. Jul. 7, 2020 $30,000,000
Canadian Forage and Grassland Association Jul. 3, 2020 $996,032
Carleton University Aug. 15, 2019 $1,500,000
Circle Cardiovascular Imaging Inc. Nov. 19, 2020 $2,647,000
COENCORP Consultant Corporation May 1, 2021 $600,000
Cognitive Systems Corp. Aug. 22, 2018 $7,268,261
COREM Aug. 8, 2019 $860,000
Council of Canadian Academies Jan. 7, 2020 $1,147,956
Eddyfi NDT inc. Nov. 9, 2018 $1,550,675
Ecoation Innovative Solutions Inc. Aug. 24, 2020 $3,875,000
Element AI Inc. Jun. 10, 2020 $20,000,000
Enns Brothers Ltd. Jul. 1, 2020 $660,000
Fluidigm Canada Inc. Jun. 1, 2018 $650,000
Giatec Scientific Inc. Oct. 1, 2018 $800,000
Genov, Roman Apr. 1, 2017 $1,136,025
Governors of the University of Alberta Oct. 29, 2018 $2,500,000
Governing Council of the University of Toronto Aug. 3, 2018 $25,000,000
Governing Council of the University of Toronto Mar. 30, 2019 $17,000,000
Governing Council of the University of Toronto Dec. 1, 2020 $1,254,375
Imagia Cybernétique Inc. Aug. 31, 2018 $1,000,000
Information Technology Association of Canada Nov. 1, 2018 $1,980,358
Linamar Corporation Jul. 6, 2018 $49,000,000
Lytica Inc Nov. 6, 2019 $1,080,000
Mckee Demczyk, Debbie Mar. 7, 2018 $2,000,000
McMaster University Oct. 18, 2019 $1,479,441
MindBridge Analytics Inc. May 1, 2019 $14,500,000
Miru Smart Technologies Corp. Apr. 1, 2021 $600,000
Mission Control Space Services Inc. Feb. 3, 2021 $3,042,959
Montréal International Jul. 9, 2020 $9,480,000
North Inc. Nov. 8, 2018 $24,000,000
North Inc. Oct 31, 2018 $24,000,000
Octopusapp Inc. Sep. 1, 2020 $3,000,000
OCED Aug. 27, 2020 $982,000
Purdie, Thomas G Apr. 1, 2013 $651,061
Savormetrics Inc. Nov. 30, 2018 $867,000
Scale.AI Mar. 15, 2018 $229,765,127
Sheikhzadeh, Mehdi Mar. 7, 2018 $2,000,000
SSIMWAVE Apr. 1, 2019 $4,232,550
Sunnybrook Research Institute May 21, 2019 $49,000,000
Tangent Design Engineering Ltd. Feb. 1, 2017 $600,000
Tangent Design Engineering Ltd. Aug. 1, 2021 $700,000
Technologies Numetrix inc. Jun. 8, 2021 $608,288
Teledyne Digital Imaging Inc. Jul. 15, 2020 $1,000,000
Terry Fox Research Institute & Imagia Cybernetics Inc. Aug. 28, 2020 $49,000,000
Tessonics Inc. Apr. 1, 2021 $600,000
University of British Columbia Jan. 1, 2020 $1,203,433
University of Manitoba Mar. 5, 2021 $1,603,078
Valacta Limited Partnership Dec. 2, 2019 $566,617
Vineland Research and Innovation Centre Apr. 1, 2018 $4,138,197

This is by no means all of the grants, just the larger ones listed.

Keep in mind, while Canada continues to bring record numbers of people into the country, we are automating entire industries. This will lead to massive losses of employment for those already here. The result is far more people, competing for far fewer positions. This sort of thing typically leads to much lower wages and benefits.

Getting artificial intelligence into aerospace and highly technical fields seems harmless enough, but it’s not going to stop there. Proponents of the AI trend never seem to realize that their jobs can also be automated out of existence as well.

This AI push will also impact the low skill market as well, and nothing is off the table. One such grant involves spending over $4 million to implement AI into the agricultural industry, and to automate a lot of the more “low skill” work. Another grant was for $30,000,000. Depending on the locations, this could mean the lack of any other options for many.

Far from being hyperbolic, automation replacing jobs has happened for decades, and will continue to do so. The service industry seems to be next on the list. Does anyone seriously think that workers will be hired back once replaced by robots? What happens to the people who can’t find work as a result of this?

Without an alternative in place for the people impacted by these drastic changes, expect chaos and instability to result from this initiative.

An interesting side note: the “political left” typically opposes free trade and globalization for the reason that it undercuts wages, and sees jobs shipped overseas. In short, decent work disappears. Mass automation will have much the same effect, and yet, silence from those same activists. How strange.

As for the “political right”: how exactly does gutting entire industries help secure an economic recovery? This trend is surely going to get worse.

Seriously, who thought this was a good idea for society?

(1) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc
(2) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/?sort=agreement_start_date_s%20desc&page=1&search_text=artificial%20intelligence
(3) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/csa-asc,003-2020-2021-Q4-04881,current
(4) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/aafc-aac,235-2018-2019-Q3-00066,current
(5) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/ic,230-2021-2022-Q1-0143,current
(6) https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/22/restaurants-looking-for-labor-and-speed-turn-to-robots-.html

Toronto Region Board Of Trade Supports Vaccine Passports, While Receiving And Encouraging Subsidies

The Toronto Region Board of Trade, TRBoT, a group that isn’t accountable to the public, and holds no public office, is openly calling for Ontario to adopt vaccine passports. The idea is that people who refuse should be denied access to what they call “non essential” services. Jan De Silva, President and CEO of the group, pushes hard for it. More on her later.

In fact, if a group wanted to kill off businesses, it’s hard to think of a better way to do this.

TORONTO – The Toronto Region Board of Trade is calling on the Ontario government to introduce a vaccine passport system for non-essential business activity.

Jan De Silva, CEO of the board, says vaccine passports are the only way to safely reopen larger events like business conferences and will help revive tourism.

“Now that we’ve got sufficient vaccine, it’s a way to start resuming a more normal form of day-to-day living.” She said it’s a personal decision to get vaccinated, but accessing major events and indoor dining requires moral responsibility.

The board of trade says it is having discussions with the Ontario premier’s office about introducing a vaccine passport system.

This should alarm people. A board representing large business interests is meeting with Doug Ford’s office to discuss limiting people’s right to free association and free movement, unless they agree to have their privacy limited and take experimental “vaccines” for a virus that likely doesn’t exist.

Remember when trade associations used to call for less government restrictions and regulations? Now, the TRBoT is doing exactly the opposite of that. And far from calling on independence, this group openly promotes the idea of its members scooping up government benefits.

The TRBoT is partially funded by the City of Toronto, the Province of Ontario and the Ministry of Energy. This means that taxpayers are helping keep this operation afloat. Beyond that, there are also dozens of private sponsors who stand to benefit from the policies proposed. Rather than demanding economic freedom, there are demands for corporate welfare.

The Toronto Board of Trade is also pushing agenda of the mass testing people at work. For businesses with less than 150 employees, enough test sticks can be included to get everyone twice a week for 4 weeks, or 8 times each overall. Of course, it’s really taxpayers footing the bill for this, although that point is minimized. What exactly happens to the personal information afterwards anyway?

Granted these tests don’t work anyway, but whatever.

In their FAQ section, the Board of Trade provides links to what kind of government support is available. It’s interesting that this group, which claims to be pro-business, isn’t demanding Ford and Tory end their martial law. Instead, they push a pattern of dependence on their members.

In June, there was an update to the list of government (taxpayer) handouts available. However, there still isn’t any urgency in just letting businesses operate normally.

Jan de Silva is the President and CEO of the TRBoT. However, her other connections lend doubt as to what her motivations are. She’s a Director at Intact Financial Corporation, a large insurance company. She’s a member of APEC (Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation), and ABLAC (Asia Business Leaders Council). She’s also a Director at Piment Investments Limited, a firm supporting business expansion in Asia. Also, she’s a non-Executive Director at Blue Umbrella Limited, which sells compliance technology, and is based in Hong Kong. Furthermore, de Silva has chaired the Canada-China Business Council in Beijing. Her profile screams pro-business (in Asia), but she calls on restricting businesses and commerce in Canada, unless certain conditions are met.

De Silva isn’t kidding about lobbying all levels of Government. In fact, the TRBoT has been registered since 2007, and she is personally listed now. What is referred to as “Digital Adaptation – to seek funding for delivery of programs helping small to medium size businesses digitally transform their end-to end operations”, likely is a euphemism that included vaccine passports.

The TRBoT also supports an interesting combination of policies that include: (a) climate change nonsense to kill jobs; (b) “globalized” trade to continue offshoring local industries; and (c) increased immigration to compete for whatever jobs are left.

This is pretty much what Conservative Inc. calls for.

Also, for an organization that claims to be for businesses and a market economy, they don’t seem to mind getting taxpayer subsidies to keep their operations going. This includes receiving CEWS, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy.

The TRBoT also supports “smart cities“, which means an almost completely digitally-run community. While this may sound convenient, there may be privacy issues to sort out. The April 14, 2021 webcast included as speakers:

1) Craig Clydesdale, Founder & CEO, Utilities Without Borders
2) Craig McLellan, CEO, ThinkOn
3) Raphael Wong, Director- Strategic Initiatives, ThoughtWire
4) Hugh O’Reilly, Executive Director, Innovate Cities

At least we’ll still have jobs when this is over, right?

Now, there is justification in the fear that jobs are disappearing permanently. TRBoT supports the Scale Up Initiative. It’s goal is to put more of the economy online, and to cut costs. Of course “cutting costs” generally means laying off employees. Keep in mind, TRBoT receives public money, which means taxpayers are subsidizing the costs of chopping the job pool available.

How do you feel about this, residents of Toronto and Ontario? Your tax money is helping fund an organization that encourages OTHER businesses to get subsidies, while pushing for vaccine passports? Yay, for capitalism.

(1) https://www.bnnbloomberg.ca/video/ontario-needs-a-vaccine-passport-mandate-by-this-fall-toronto-region-board-of-trade-ceo~2241660
(2) https://www.680news.com/2021/07/13/toronto-board-of-trade-vaccine-passports/
(3) https://www.bot.com/AboutUs/WhoWeAre/Sponsors.aspx
(4) https://supportbusiness.bot.com/screening-kits/
(5) https://supportbusiness.bot.com/faqs/
(6) https://supportbusiness.bot.com/2021/06/07/covid-19-government-and-international-response-june-4-2021/
(7) https://www.bot.com/AboutUs/Governance/AnnualReports.aspx
(8) TRBOT Annual Report 2020 FINAL
(9) TRBOT-Annual-Report-2021
(10) https://www.linkedin.com/in/alaina-tennison/
(11) https://archive.is/SUeuH
(12) https://www.linkedin.com/in/janetdesilva/
(13) https://archive.is/Mbh5s
(14) https://supportbusinessdev.bot.com/webinars/rap-webcast-series-3-smart-cities-solutions-to-upgrade-and-drive-your-business-forward/
(15) https://wtctoronto.com/scale-up/
(16) https://wtctoronto.com/rap/
(17) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?cno=15291&regId=911677
(18) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/cews/srch/pub/bscSrch

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