Canada Before 1970: Growing A Population Without Replacing It

In Western societies, there seems to be the mentality that populations must always grow. Furthermore, large numbers of people from very different backgrounds should be brought in to make this happen. At least, this is what public figures and media heads say, regardless of what the citizens want.

That being said, this “diversity” push is something that has only existed for the last 50 years or so. Before that, there was a focus on maintaining the demographic makeup. Let’s take a look.

A good starting place would be to see how many people are coming to Canada every year. Although this doesn’t tell the entire story, the numbers of Permanent Residents is a good place to start.

YEAR PERMANENT RESIDENTS % OF POPULATION
1852 29,307
1853 29,464
1854 37,263
1855 25,296
1856 22,544
1857 33,854
1858 12,339
1859 6,300
1860 6,276 0.2
1861 13,589 0.4
1862 18,294 0.6
1863 21,000 0.6
1864 24,779 0.7
1865 18,958 0.6
1866 11,427 0.3
1867 10,666 0.3
1868 12,765 0.4
1869 18,630 0.5
1870 24,706 0.7
1871 27,773 0.8
1872 36,578 1.0
1873 50,050 1.3
1874 39,373 1.0
1875 27,382 0.7
1876 25,633 0.6
1877 27,082 0.7
1878 29,807 0.7
1879 40,492 1.0
1880 38,505 0.9
1881 47,991 1.1
1882 112,458 2.6
1883 133,624 3.0
1884 103,824 2.3
1885 76,169 1.7
1886 69,152 1.5
1887 84,526 1.8
1888 88,766 1.9
1889 91,600 1.9
1890 75,067 1.6
1891 82,165 1.7
1892 30,996 0.6
1893 29,633 0.6
1894 20,829 0.4
1895 18,790 0.4
1896 16,835 0.3
1897 21,716 0.4
1898 31,900 0.6
1899 44,543 0.9
1900 41,681 0.8
1901 55,747 1.0
1902 89,102 1.6
1903 138,660 2.5
1904 131,252 2.3
1905 141,465 2.4
1906 211,653 5.3
1907 272,409 4.2
1908 143,326 2.2
1909 173,694 2.6
1910 286,839 4.1
1911 331,288 4.6
1912 375,756 5.1
1913 400,870 5.3
1914 150,484 1.9
1915 33,665 0.4
1916 55,914 0.7
1917 72,910 0.9
1918 41,845 0.5
1919 107,698 1.3
1920 138,824 1.6
1921 91,728 1.0
1922 64,224 0.7
1923 133,729 1.5
1924 124,164 1.4
1925 84,907 0.9
1926 135,982 1.4
1927 158,886 1.6
1928 166,783 1.7
1929 164,993 1.6
1930 104,806 1.0
1931 27,530 0.3
1932 20,591 0.2
1933 14,382 0.1
1934 12,476 0.1
1935 11,277 0.1
1936 11,643 0.1
1937 15,101 0.1
1938 17,244 0.2
1939 16,994 0.2
1940 11,324 0.1
1941 9,329 0.1
1942 7,576 0.1
1943 8,504 0.1
1944 12,801 0.1
1945 22,722 0.2
1946 71,719 0.6
1947 64,127 0.5
1948 125,414 1.0
1949 95,217 0.7
1950 73,912 0.5
1951 194,391 1.4
1952 164,498 1.1
1953 168,868 1.1
1954 154,227 1.0
1955 109,946 0.7
1956 164,857 1.0
1957 282,164 1.7
1958 124,851 0.7
1959 106,928 0.6
1960 104,111 0.6
1961 71,698 0.4
1962 74,856 0.4
1963 93,151 0.5
1964 112,606 0.6
1965 146,758 0.7
1966 194,743 1.0
1967 222,876 1.1
1968 183,974 0.9
1969 164,531 0.8
1970 147,713 0.7
1971 121,900 0.6
1972 122,006 0.6
1973 184,200 0.8
1974 218,465 1.0
1975 187,881 0.8
1976 149,429 0.6
1977 114,914 0.5
1978 86,313 0.4
1979 112,093 0.5
1980 43,137 0.6
1981 128,641 0.5
1982 121,175 0.5
1983 89,186 0.4
1984 88,272 0.3
1985 84,347 0.3
1986 99,355 0.4
1987 152,079 0.6
1988 161,588 0.6
1989 191,555 0.7
1990 86,452 0.6
1991 232,806 0.8
1992 254,790 0.9
1993 256,641 0.9
1994 224,385 0.8
1995 212,865 0.7
1996 226,071 0.8
1997 216,035 0.7
1998 174,195 0.6
1999 189,951 0.6
2000 227,456 0.7
2001 250,637 0.8
2002 229,048 0.7
2003 221,349 0.7
2004 235,823 0.7
2005 262,242 0.8
2006 251,640 0.8
2007 236,753 0.7
2008 247,247 0.7
2009 252,172 0.7
2010 280,689 0.8
2011 248,748 0.7
2012 257,887 0.7

Source for this chart is that data provided on page 3. Also, data for some earlier years is provided by Statistics Canada.

Even though large numbers of people have been coming to Canada for a long time, there was still a lot of social cohesion. This is because migrants were primarily selected from countries with a very similar makeup and composition.

Historically, the numeric predominance of those of British and French origin was unquestionable. Before the great wave of European migration to Canada between 1896 and the beginning of the First World War, Canada’s population was indeed mainly made up of those of British and French origin. For example, the 1871 Census of Canada shows that 60 percent of Canada’s 3.5 million people were of British origin, and 30 percent French origin; Europeans not of British nor French origin accounted for only 7 percent of Canada’s population in 1871 as well as in 1881 (Kalbach, 1990: 24). This demographic composition basically persisted until the turn of the century.

The wave of immigration to Canada prior to the First World War began to increase the stock of Europeans not from British or French origin. Between 1896 and 1914, over three million immigrants came to Canada. When the supply of emigrants from England and Western Europe was dwindling, Canada began accepting people from Eastern and Southern Europe, including Poles, Ukrainians, Hutterites and Doukhobors. In the period between the two world wars from 1915 to 1945, another two million immigrants came to Canada (Statistics Canada, 1983: A125-163).

The census data of Canada indicate that Canadians of European origin other than British and French increased from 8.5 percent of the total population in 1901 to 14.2 percent in 1921, and to 17.8 percent in 1941 (Kalbach, 1990: 24). In contrast, Canadians of British origin declined in relative terms from 57 percent of the total population in 1901 to 50 percent in 1941, but those of French origin remained at around 30 percent of the total population in 1901 and in 1941. In short, if the composition of Canadians of European origin other than British and French is used as an indicator of ethnic plurality, then there was an increase in diversity between 1901 and 1941. However, Canada’s population in 1941, as in 1871, was made up of people mainly of European origin, which accounted for 98 percent of the total population in 1941 and in 1871, despite the fact that the population had increased from 3.5 million people in 1871 to 11.5 million people in 1941.

The Government of Canada openly admits that traditionally, the bulk of immigration came from Europe. More specifically, it came from the West, from places like Britain and France. (See archive).

And what was the result of this? Very little in terms of enclaves or balkanization. The population grew, but without the genocidal “multicultural” push that goes around now. This type of system focused on cultural compatibility, something that would be unthinkable today.

TIME PERIOD REGION # OF MIGRANTS % OF TOTAL
1968-1972 Europe 387,670 52.6
United States 114,615 15.5
Central/South America 24,863 3.4
Carribean 53,100 7.2
Asia 112,584 15.3
Africa 22,014 3
Australia 18,656 2.5
Oceania 0 0
Not Stated 3,622 0.5
Total 737,124 100
1973-1977 Europe 324,131 37.9
United States 102,141 11.9
Central/South America 63,598 7.4
Asia 216,837 25.4
Africa 42,748 5
Australia 10,870 1.3
Oceania 7,937 0.9
Not Stated 0 0
Total 854,889 100
1978-1982 Europe 196,546 33.2
United States 49,407 8.4
Central/South America 36,262 6.1
Carribean 39,362 6.7
Asia 236,596 40
Africa 21,946 3.7
Australia 6,438 1.1
Oceania 4,502 0.8
Not Stated 232 0
Total 591,291 100
1983-1987 Europe 124.344 24.42
United States 36,214 7.1
Central/South America 56,442 11
Carribean 39,079 7.6
Asia 226,326 44.1
Africa 24,027 4.7
Australia 2,774 0.5
Oceania 3,771 0.7
Not Stated 38 0
Total 513,015 100
1988-1992 Europe 237,666 22.6
United States 33,686 3.2
Central/South America 91,061 8.7
Carribean 59,911 5.7
Asia 545,410 51.9
Africa 70,744 6.7
Australia 4,771 0.5
Oceania 8,534 0.8
Not Stated 0 0
Total 1,051,783 100
1993-1995 Europe 126,509 18.3
United States 19,433 2.8
Central/South America 39,199 5.7
Carribean 36,599 5.3
Asia 418,016 60.4
Africa 45,255 6.5
Australia 3,476 0.5
Oceania 3,791 0.5
Not Stated 0 0
Total 692,198 100

The Government’s own data tables show just how rapidly the source countries have been shifting. While immigration to Canada used to mainly be from Europe, it’s now overwhelmingly Asian. Looking at the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament in recent years, this trend has only gotten worse.

Now, were the voters ever asked if they wanted to become minorities?

Article I
The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.

Article II
In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:
(a) Killing members of the group;
(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

Article III
The following acts shall be punishable:
(a) Genocide;
(b) Conspiracy to commit genocide;
(c) Direct and public incitement to commit genocide;
(d) Attempt to commit genocide;
(e) Complicity in genocide.

Article IV
Persons committing genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III shall be punished, whether they are constitutionally responsible rulers, public officials or private individuals.

A Government doesn’t have to round up and execute its citizens in order to commit genocide. Another way is to flood the country with large numbers of very different people, with the purpose and intent of diluting and erasing the host population. Instead of having a national identity, society becomes “multicultural”.

One caveat of course: the people coming in are encouraged to maintain their own identities, customs, traditions, and language. The populations being replaced are expected to endlessly accommodate that.

If a larger population is needed, it’s entirely possible to grow it organically. However, modern efforts across the West can best be explained as attempting to erase groups entirely.

(1) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2013/cic/Ci1-8-2012-eng.pdf
(2) https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/2011003/fig/fig3_1-2-eng.cfm
(3) https://justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/csj-sjc/jsp-sjp/rp02_8-dr02_8/t2.html
(4) https://archive.ph/QkUeu
(5) https://justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/csj-sjc/jsp-sjp/rp02_8-dr02_8/p2.html
(6) https://archive.ph/PzcO3
(7) https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/genocide-convention.shtml
(8) https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/documents/atrocity-crimes/Doc.1_Convention%20on%20the%20Prevention%20and%20Punishment%20of%20the%20Crime%20of%20Genocide.pdf
(9) UN Convention On Punishing And Preventing Genocide

M-44: Parliament Votes To Accelerate TFW/Student-To-PR Pipeline

Motion M-44 has recently passed. The House of Commons voted to demand that the Trudeau Government come up with new ways to accelerate the transition of “temporary” foreign workers and international students into Permanent Residents.

The legislation was advanced by Liberal Randeep Sarai. This isn’t at all surprising, considering the largest group coming to Canada in recent years has been Indians.

The final vote was 324-0. This means each Member of Parliament who voted did so in favour of this Motion, regardless of partisan affiliation. Every single “Conservative” voted in favour of speeding up demographic replacement by supporting this.

Even worse: they condemn the truthful description of what’s happening as racist conspiracy theories.

It’s interesting that there’s no hurry by Federal politicians to get rid of masks or vaccine passports. However, all of Parliament agreed that there should be a plan within the next 4 months to expand and speed up pathways to creating more Permanent Residents.

MOTION TEXT
That, in the opinion of the House, the government should develop and publicly release within 120 days following the adoption of this motion a comprehensive plan to expand the economic immigration stream to allow workers of all skill levels to meet the full range of labour needs and pathways to permanent residency for temporary foreign workers, including international students, with significant Canadian work experience in sectors with persistent labour shortages, and such plan should incorporate the following elements:
.
(a) amending eligibility criteria under economic immigration programs to give more weight to significant in-Canada work experience and expand the eligible occupational categories and work experience at various skills levels;
.
(b) examining evidence and data gathered from recent programs such as Temporary Resident to Permanent Resident Pathway, Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP), Rural and Northern Immigration Program (RNIP), and Agri-Food Pilot, and Provincial Nominee Process (PNP);
.
(c) incorporating data on labour market and skills shortages to align policy on immigrant-selection with persistent labour gaps;
.
(d) assessing ways to increase geographic distribution of immigration and encourage immigrant retention in smaller communities, as well as increase Francophone immigration outside Quebec;
.
(e) identifying mechanisms for ensuring flexibility in immigration-selection tools to react quicker to changes in labour market needs and regional economic priorities; and
.
(f) specifically considering occupations and essential sectors that are underrepresented in current economic immigration programs, such as health services, caregivers, agriculture, manufacturing, service industry, trades, and transportation.

What specific sectors will be targeted? Included are: health services, caregivers, agriculture, manufacturing, service industry, trades, and transportation. Of course, it’s much easier to support a family if they are living in a country with a much lower cost of living.

Sure, one could argue that it’s just to demand a plan. However, Trudeau is extremely accommodating when it comes to finding new ways to bring people into Canada.

Another development saw the Government extend the work visas for graduates get extended by 18 months. Now, students who complete a diploma or degree are typically eligible for a 3 year open work visa (via the Post Graduate Work Program). For those involved, it effectively makes those permits 4 1/2 years. It’s unclear if this is just a one-off.

In 2020, the Government quietly made changes to allow people on student visas to work an unlimited amount of hours — while still in school. This policy existed to ensure that students were in fact focused on studying, and not just using it as a backdoor work permit. See page 12 of 2021 Report. Guess we’ll see if it ever goes back.

It seems unlikely that the average Canadian has any idea just how many students and “temporary” workers come to Canada. This should demonstrate the trend, at least for recent years.

Year Stu TFWP IMP Total
2003 61,293 82,151 143,444

2004 56,536 90,668 147,204

2005 57,476 99,146 156,622

2006 61,703 112,658 174,361

2007 64,636 165,198 229,834

2008 79,509 192,519 272,028

2009 85,140 178,478 263,618

2010 96,157 182,276 278,433

2011 98,383 190,842 289,225

2012 104,810 213,573 318,383

2013 111,865 221,310 333,175

2014 127,698 95,086 197,924 420,078

2015 219,143 73,016 175,967 468,126

2016 265,111 78,402 207,829 551,342

2017 317,328 78,788 224,033 620,149

2018 356,876 84,229 255,034 696,139

2019 402,427 98,310 306,797 807,534

2020 256,740 84,609 242,130 583,452

Stu = Student Visa
TFWP = Temporary Foreign Worker Program
IMP = International Mobility Program

Data for this table was compiled from the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament, from 2004 through 2021. These cover the years 2003 to 2020. Keep in mind, this is just what’s on the books.

How many of them actually stay? It’s hard to say. Either the Government doesn’t keep data on this this, or they do, but just don’t make it easily available.

About the change from 2013 to 2014: the Harper Government got a lot of flack for flooding Canada with TFWs. The solution they came up with was not to reduce the number of them. Instead, they broke up the program into different areas to better conceal what was happening. This has been addressed elsewhere on this site.

Simply beyond pumping up the people who are getting PR status, the Canadian Parliament has also been holding hearings since February on the topic of boosting the number of international students coming in the first place.

More people coming + more staying = faster rate of change

The lie has been heavily promoted that it’s only 300,000 or 400,000 people coming to Canada per year. It’s not. Whether it’s ignorance or malice, very few report the truth, including those in alternative media. Here’s a recent review of the numbers in Canada. It’s shocking, or at least it should be.

While politicians here facilitate open borders, it’s worth mentioning that over 4.2 million babies have been aborted since 1970. Then of course, they’re feminism and the globohomo agenda doing a number on birth rates. The solution then becomes to bring more people over, to compensate for a declining population.

Are things starting to make sense now?

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn the hard truth about what’s been going on in this country.

(1) https://www.ourcommons.ca/members/en/89339/motions/11528727
(2) https://www.ourcommons.ca/members/en/randeep-sarai(89339)
(3) https://www.ourcommons.ca/Members/en/votes/44/1/85
(4) https://www.ourcommons.ca/Committees/en/CIMM/StudyActivity?studyActivityId=11473703
(5) https://kitchener.citynews.ca/national-news/federal-government-will-let-international-graduates-stay-in-canada-another-18-months-5291183
(6) https://www.cp24.com/news/tory-leadership-candidate-pierre-poilievre-denounces-white-replacement-theory-1.5906421

2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2015.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2016.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2017.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2018.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2019.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2020.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2021.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament

Demographic Makeup Of People Entering Canada Illegally 2017-2021

Now for something that isn’t covered much by mainstream (or alternative) media. Who exactly is coming into Canada illegally, in between official border ports of entry? What are the numbers? Fortunately, the Immigration and Refugee Board has at least some information to share.

RANK COUNTRY INTAKE ACC REJ ABAN WD&O RESOLVED PENDING
n/a Total 60,544 25,802 18,010 1,059 3,404 49,000 11,544
1 Nigeria 16,374 4,739 7,279 189 1,785 13,992 2,382
2 Haiti 9,350 2,210 4,595 323 517 7,645 1,705
3 Colombia 3,565 1,629 486 57 117 2,289 1,276
4 Pakistan 2,406 1,184 670 21 115 1,990 416
5 DR Congo 2,165 479 416 36 145 1,076 1,089
6 Turkey 2,011 1,812 43 <20 <20 1,901 110
7 Sudan 1,694 1,372 123 25 77 1,597 97
8 Angola 1,486 420 381 <20 <20 865 621
9 Eritrea 1,224 1,004 <20 <20 105 1,178 46
19 U.S.A. 1,203 24 754 57 160 995 208
n/a All Others 19,066 10,929 3,205 308 305 15,472 3,594

ACC = Accepted
REJ = Rejected
ABAN = Abandoned
WD&O = Withdrawn And Other

**The IRB lists some totals as <20, and they claim that this is done for privacy reasons. The logic seems to be that if there were only a few who crossed, it would be easier to identify them.

The above totals are from February 2017 to December​​ 2021. The IRB claims that it didn’t have access to such information prior to this.

Isn’t this lovely, that the bulk of the people ILLEGALLY entering Canada are from the 3rd World? But let’s be fair, we don’t have nearly enough rocket scientists and brain surgeons here already. Keep in mind, these people have entered the United States — at some point — and decided to continue onwards. They’ve already passed on at least one safe country, one that gets hundreds of thousands of applications per year.

And again, this could be stopped very quickly. However, politicians (of all stripes) actively work against the interests of their own citizens.

(1) https://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/statistics/Pages/irregular-border-crossers-countries.aspx
(2) https://archive.ph/x4T1i
(3) Wayback Machine

Illegal Aliens Coming Into Canada: 2022, And Earlier

Things are picking up again, particularly in Quebec.

YEAR: 2022
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 2,367 0 16 0 2,383
February 2,154 1 9 0 2,164
March 2,492 2 8 0 2,502
TOTALS 7,013 3 33 0 7,049

It appears that illegals coming into Canada is back in full swing, not that it ever stopped. Over 7,000 people were intercepted by the RCMP in the first 3 months of 2022. Of course, this is just what’s on the books, and just what’s publicly available.

The police didn’t seem to have any issues with shutting down businesses, stopping peaceful protests, enforcing mask orders, and the like. However, enforcing borders is something they lack the willpower to do. But they do make good bellhops.

Of course, this problem has been going on for a very long time. Here are some earlier years, to show the trends. There was a significant drop (although not a complete stop) during this “pandemic” psy-op. Perhaps Government at least needs to put on appearances.

Let’s not pretend that this is an unsolvable problem. Governments could put a stop to mass illegal entries very quickly, if that was their goal. But they don’t, regardless of what party is in power.

PROVINCE/TERRITORY 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Newfoundland 0 0 0 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 10 5 5 ? ? 25
Quebec 1,335 1,295 785 875 1,035 2,595
Ontario 2,660 2,340 1,995 2,630 2,790 3,7935
Manitoba 20 15 25 10 225 505
Saskatchewan ? ? ? ? ? 30
Alberta 35 40 35 65 70 120
British Columbia 125 85 110 130 170 220
Yukon 0 0 0 0 0 5
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS 4,185 3,770 2,955 3,715 4,290 7,365

Illegals were still coming into Canada via land border crossings during the Harper years. However, it’s only considered an issue when Trudeau is in power.

YEAR: 2017
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 245 19 46 5 315
February 452 142 84 0 678
March 654 170 71 2 897
April 672 146 32 9 859
May 576 106 60 0 742
June 781 63 39 1 884
July 2,996 87 51 0 3,314
August 5,530 80 102 0 5,712
September 1,720 78 79 4 1,881
October 1,755 67 68 8 1,890
November 1,539 38 46 0 1,623
December 1,916 22 40 0 1,978
TOTAL 18,836 1,018 718 22 20,593
YEAR: 2018
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 1,458 18 41 0 1,517
February 1,486 31 48 0 1,565
March 1,884 53 33 0 1,970
April 2,479 50 31 0 2,560
May 1,775 36 53 0 1,869
June 1,179 31 53 0 1,263
July 1,552 51 31 0 1,634
August 1,666 39 39 3 1,747
September 1,485 44 68 4 1,601
October 1,334 23 37 0 1,394
November 978 23 18 0 1,019
December 1,242 11 27 0 1,280
TOTAL 18,518 410 479 7 19,419
YEAR: 2019
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 871 1 16 1 888
February 800 1 6 2 808
March 967 13 22 0 1,002
April 1,206 15 25 0 1,246
May 1,149 27 20 0 1,196
June 1,536 26 5 0 1,567
July 1,835 23 15 1 1,874
August 1,712 26 22 2 1,762
September 1,706 19 17 0 1,737
October 1,595 18 8 1 1,622
November 1,118 9 21 0 1,148
December 1,646 2 5 2 1,653
TOTAL 16,136 180 182 9 16,503
YEAR: 2020
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 1,086 7 7 0 1,100
February 976 2 2 0 980
March 930 7 18 0 955
April 1 0 5 0 6
May 17 0 4 0 21
June 28 1 3 1 33
July 29 2 17 0 48
August 15 3 0 0 18
September 30 4 7 0 41
October 27 0 4 0 31
November 24 0 8 0 32
December 26 2 8 0 36
TOTAL 3,189 28 84 1 3,302
YEAR: 2021
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 28 1 10 0 39
February 39 0 1 0 40
March 29 5 2 0 36
April 29 2 2 0 33
May 12 3 13 0 28
June 11 0 6 0 17
July 28 5 6 0 39
August 63 2 11 0 76
September 150 0 19 0 169
October 96 0 17 0 113
November 832 1 12 0 845
December 2,778 0 33 0 2,811
TOTAL 4,095 19 132 0 4,246

One can only imagine how bad the rest of 2022 will end up being with this issue. Of course, the vast scale of LEGAL immigration is a much, MUCH bigger problem than the illegal entries. That said, it’s not an issue that can be ignored.

There are of course some other points to bring up to give additional context to the subject of illegal border crossings.

Something not really reported on in 2019 was the fact that the Canadian Government scrapped the DCO, or Designated Country of Origin policy. This stopped people from 42 countries (mainly in Europe) from being able to abuse the refugee system with bogus claims.

The Parties agree to review this Agreement and its implementation. The first review shall take place not later than 12 months from the date of entry into force and shall be jointly conducted by representatives of each Party. The Parties shall invite the UNHCR to participate in this review. The Parties shall cooperate with UNHCR in the monitoring of this Agreement and seek input from non-governmental organizations.

As for the Safe 3rd Country Agreement, people are still allowed to enter, and it’s still being gamed by human smugglers and traffickers.

Section 8 of the text makes it clear that the UNHCR, or United Nations High Commission on Refugees, is a Party to this Treaty. Interestingly, this detail is never reported by the mainstream press.

In addition to the people who ILLEGALLY enter Canada, our “authorities” LEGALLY let in thousands of people each year who had initially been denied for a variety of reasons. IRPA, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, has at least 2 provisions to allow inadmissible people in anyway. These are sections 24(1) and 25.1(2).

Even if previously deemed inadmissible to Canada to be given Temporary Resident Permits anyway. Here are the totals from the Annual Reports to Parliament on Immigration. Note: the first one listed only started in 2010.

Those allowed in under Rule 25.1(2) of IRPA

YEAR TRP Issued Cumulative
2010 17 17
2011 53 70
2012 53 123
2013 280 403
2014 385 788
2015 1,063 1,851
2016 596 2,447
2017 555 3002
2018 669 3,671
2019 527 4,198
2020 115 4,313

From 2010 to 2020, a total of 4,313 people who were otherwise inadmissible to Canada were allowed in anyway under Rule 25.1(2) of IRPA. This is the category that Global News previously reported on. As for the other one, under Rule 24(1) of IRPA, Global News leaves that out:

Year Permits Cumulative
2002 12,630 12,630
2003 12,069 24,699
2004 13,598 38,297
2005 13,970 52,267
2006 13,412 65,679
2007 13,244 78,923
2008 12,821 91,744
2009 15,640 107,384
2010 12,452 119,836
2011 11,526 131,362
2012 13,564 144,926
2013 13,115 158,041
2014 10,624 168,665
2015 10,333 178,998
2016 10,568 189,566
2017 9,221 198,787
2018 7,132 205,919
2019 6,080 211,999
2020 2,044 214,043

From 2002 to 2020 (inclusive), a total of 214,043 people previously deemed inadmissible to Canada were given Temporary Resident Permits anyway. This has almost certainly been going on for a lot longer, but is as far back as the reports go. Now let’s consider the reasons these people are initially refused entry.

SEC = Security (espionage, subversion, terrorism)
HRV = Human or International Rights Violations
CRIM = Criminal
S.CRIM = Serious Criminal
NC = Non Compliance
MR = Misrepresentation

YEAR Total SEC HRV Crim S.Crim NC MR
2002 12,630 ? ? ? ? ? ?
2003 12,069 17 25 5,530 869 4,855 39
2004 13,598 12 12 7,096 953 4,981 20
2005 13,970 27 15 7,917 981 4,635 21
2006 13,412 29 20 7,421 982 4,387 18
2007 13,244 25 8 7,539 977 4,109 14
2008 12,821 73 18 7,108 898 4,170 17
2009 15,640 32 23 6,619 880 7,512 10
2010 12,452 86 24 6,451 907 4,423 36
2011 11,526 37 14 6,227 899 3,932 11
2012 13,564 20 15 7,014 888 5,206 18
2013 13,115 17 10 6,816 843 5,135 8
2014 10,624 12 2 5,807 716 3,895 14
2015 10,333 3 3 5,305 578 4,315 28
2016 10,568 8 4 4,509 534 2,788 20
2017 9,221 10 5 5,035 591 3,412 121
2018 7,132 5 3 4,132 559 2,299 131
2019 6,080 2 0 3,202 546 2,139 175
2020 2,044 2 1 666 131 1,000 37

In 2020, only 2,044 people barred were allowed in under Rule 24(1) of IRPA, which is the lowest it’s been since this legislation was enacted. Nonetheless, ZERO of these people should be coming in.

Interestingly, even though the Government has wide discretion to let people into the country under 24(1) and 25.1(2) of IRPA, it chose not to use its discretion to prohibit anyone from entering.

The data for these tables was compiled from the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament. They are included at the bottom as source material.

Even if people are excluded from Canada — for a variety of valid reasons — often they will still be given temporary entrance into Canada. Will they ever leave? Who knows?

Not only are people let in who shouldn’t be, but sanctuary cities like Toronto and Montreal provide social services (at taxpayer expense) to people here illegally. Do right wingers oppose this? Nope, many of them have facilitated this problem.

Of course, none of this addresses the elephant in the room: the genocidal levels of replacement migration that come in through various legal channels on visas.

It’s strange that so many who identify as conservatives or nationalists are silent on what’s going on. Worse, these gatekeepers condemn and mock people who speak up on these important issues. To all those constitutionalists out there: how will you maintain your systems of law when you are eventually outvoted by people who want very different things?

(1) https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/roxham-road-reopen-1.6257868
(2) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/processed-claims.html
(3) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2017.html
(4) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2018.html
(5) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2019.html
(6) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2020.html
(7) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2021.html
(8) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2022.html
(9) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/05/canada-ends-the-designated-country-of-origin-practice.html
(10) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/mandate/policies-operational-instructions-agreements/agreements/safe-third-country-agreement/final-text.html
(11) https://canucklaw.ca/tsce-10c-bit-of-history-doug-rob-ford-voted-in-2013-for-sanctuary-toronto-amnesty-for-illegals/

ANNUAL IMMIGRATION REPORTS TO PARLIAMENT
2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2015.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2016.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2017.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2018.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2019.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2020.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2021.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament

Unpopular Opinion: If You “DO” Vote, You Don’t Have The Right To Complain

It’s a widely repeated mantra among many that “If you don’t vote, you don’t have the right to complain”. The logic seems to be that citizens aren’t allowed to criticize the state of affairs unless they cast a ballot for someone. Apparently, taking a principled stance in not supporting anyone is grounds to limit the ability to comment.

However, many of these same irate voters will express frustration and disillusionment with their choices within 6 months to 3 years. That said, it won’t stop people from endorsing the same people again and again. After all, the alternative is worse, right?

While this would certainly apply to Ontario — which has an election in June — the same principles are valid at all levels of Government.

This raises the interesting question: should people who voted for a dishonest and mediocre candidate have the right to complain afterwards?

Certainly, there will be claims that the voters had no idea that so-and-so would be so deceitful. Is that true though? Would a reasonable amount of due diligence have led to the conclusion that certain people can’t be trusted? Given that we are now in the internet era, it’s easier than ever to do background checks on the people running for office.

In fairness, the average person had no idea about this “pandemic” hoax that would be launched a few years ago. Still, this is a problem that goes much further back.

Take a look through any social media site. People will say they are voting for a person, not because they like or trust them, but because the alternative is worse. A great number also struggle to give any coherent reason as to why they are doing it. Using Ford as a specific example, Twitter is filled with people pledging to vote for the man who destroyed their Province — because Horwath and Del Duca would be much worse.

As lame a “journalist” as Brian Lilley is, he unfortunately sums up the right-wing quite well in Ontario, and Canada more broadly. Mindless sheep vote en masse for someone they KNOW will continue to wreck society. Ford brought in mask mandates, vaccine passports, issued stay-at-home orders, shut down entire sectors of business, ruined school for children, etc…. and he may very well get RE-ELECTED.

In the 2021 Federal election, millions voted for the Conservative Party of Canada. This came in spite of them being subsidized by Trudeau, and running on a PRO-vaccine passport agenda.

Support isn’t limited to real parties either. One would think that a “party” that doesn’t elect its leader, have a constitution, or vote on policies would be a cause for concern. After all, it’s been 4 years. Sadly, some simply cannot be reasoned with.

Take the U.K. as another example: Boris Johnson claimed (when running to replace Theresa May) that he would slash immigration to the “tens of thousands”. However, all it takes is a quick search to know that he supported amnesty for hundreds of thousands of illegals, while acting as Mayor of London.

In reality, it’s quite easy to check out candidates who are running for office. This is especially true if they’ve had a career in politics. Very few actually do it though.

Back to the premise of the article: if someone has no interest in performing any due diligence on the people who want to run their municipalities, provinces, or country, do they have the right to complain? Moreover, when the politician they helped install breaks all promises, are the voters not complicit in helping them?

If you vote for someone — while ignoring all of the warning signs — you are an accomplice to whatever destructive policies they may enact. As such, you don’t have the right to complain.

Here’s another unpopular opinion: universal voting is a bad idea. If someone can’t be bothered to do their homework on what they’re voting for, it’s detrimental to allow them access.

Update: As mentioned below, some countries, like Australia, make voting mandatory. With that in mind, it wouldn’t be fair to treat that the same way, if force is applied. The article was designed with Canada in mind, which doesn’t have such requirements.

Eugenics In Canada: 20% Of Babies Aborted In “Pro-Choice Movement”

Ever wonder just how much of the Canadian public has been lost due to “abortion” in recent decades? Considering the size and scale of this, it must be good business.

According to a compilation of data from the Federal Government, approximately 20% of pregnancies have ended in abortion. Of course, this relies on transparent reporting, so the number could be much higher. These totals exclude miscarriages and stillbirths.

For a good source on this data, visit Love4Life. There is a considerable amount of statistical data compiled, and it connects back to official Government sources.

Now, there are going to be some discrepancies in the data. This is partly because of incomplete reporting, and also because some sources have different numbers. Nonetheless, it should paint the picture quite gruesomely.

Let’s drop the spoiler here: there were over 4,222,858 abortions between 1970 and 2020. This isn’t a joke. Our “pro-choice” supporters and policies have literally killed millions of Canadians.

It’s also quite interesting that many of the same people are behind two (seemingly) opposing ideologies within Western countries. Then again, population replacement is just some racist conspiracy theory.

[1] Promote widespread abortion locally
[2] Promote mass immigration to counter falling birth rates

Anyhow, let’s look at some of these numbers:

*** The U.N. has some data prior to 1974, so that’s added in:

YEAR ABORTIONS
1970 11,200
1971 30,923
1973 43,201
1974 52,435
1975 53,705
1976 58,712
1977 59,864
1978 66,710
1979 69,745
1980 72,099
1981 71,911
1982 75,071
1983 69,368
1984 69,449
1985 69,216
1986 69,572
1987 70,023
1988 72,693
1989 79,315
1990 92,901
1991 95,059
1992 102,085
1993 104,403
1994 106,255
1995 108,248
1996 111,659
1997 111,709
1998 110,331
1999 105,666
2000 105,427
2001 106,418
2002 105,154
2003 103,768
2004 100,039
2005 96,815
2006 91,310
2007 98,762
2008 95,876
2009 93,755
2010 *64,641
2011 108,844
2012 100,958
2013 102,446
2014 100,194
2015 100,104
2016 97,764
2017 94,030
2018 85,294
2019 83,576
2020 74,155

**Note: data is combined from CIHI and Statistics Canada. The Canadian Institute for Health Information does have considerable recent data on abortion in this country.

*2010 is considered incomplete, since there wasn’t reporting from Quebec.

The Abortion Rights Coalition of Canada also compiles recent statistics on abortion numbers here. (see archive). It’s actually pretty morbid to think about.

According to Statistics Canada, there were 1,375,774 abortions between the years of 1987 to 2000. This is a span of 14 years, and showed an average of about 98,000 abortions per year. This amounted to some 263 performed per day.

If we factor in the data from 1970 to 2020 (data from a few different tables), there were 4,222,858 abortions. This covers 51 years, and would be approximately 86,000 per year. Converted into daily totals, that means roughly 227 babies would have died, every single day.

Don’t worry, it’s about to get a lot more disgusting when the ages of the girls and women are taken into account. There are an awful lot of children getting abortions.

YEAR ABORTIONS UNKNOWN UNDER 15 15 TO 17 18 TO 19
1974 52,435 0 623 7,937 7,868
1975 53,705 0 650 8,135 8,038
1976 58,712 0 717 8,551 8,764
1977 59,864 0 697 8,684 9,051
1978 66,710 0 642 9,228 10,453
1979 69,745 0 694 9,661 10,827
1980 72,099 0 613 9,650 11,115
1981 71,911 0 607 8,954 10,785
1982 75,071 0 586 8,463 11,073
1983 69,368 0 561 7,150 9,568
1984 69,449 0 504 6,887 8,996
1985 69,216 0 554 6,658 8,525
1986 69,572 0 430 6,636 8,497
1987 70,023 0 433 6,411 8,587
1988 72,693 0 424 6,361 8,916
1989 79,315 0 452 6,446 9,755
1990 92,901 0 597 7,635 10,639
1991 95,059 0 495 7,722 10,492
1992 102,085 0 580 8,153 11,037
1993 104,403 1 659 8,249 11,740
1994 106,255 338 526 8,386 12,371
1995 108,248 2,242 545 7,887 12,388
1996 111,659 2,439 532 8,117 13,021
1997 111,709 3,547 511 8,175 12,458
1998 110,331 3,832 464 7,741 13,118
1999 105,666 232 464 7,253 13,357
2000 105,427 219 389 7,369 10,611
2001 106,418 33 412 7,222 12,746
2002 105,154 17 337 6,381 12,626
2003 103,768 14 302 5,785 11,871
2004 100,039 5 304 5,974 10,964
2005 96,815 2 284 5,588 10,477
2006 91,310 156 267 5,608 9,609

Data available from Statistics Canada: 1987 to 2000. Another version, which goes from 1974 to 2006, is also available. There are a few discrepancies, but the total is still shocking.

It’s also worth pointing out that starting in 1994, there were large numbers of women getting abortions for which there was no age listed. Just a hunch, but most of them were probably either in the country illegally, or didn’t want to disclose that they were minors.

Also, these are just “official” statistics. It’s very likely that there are a lot more abortions that have gone on, and are unreported. And recently:

induced-abortion-can-2015-en-web
induced-abortion-can-2016-en-web
induced-abortion-2017-en-web (1)
induced-abortions-reported-in-canada-in-2018-updated-data-tables-en-web
induced-abortions-reported-in-canada-in-2019-en (1)
induced-abortions-reported-in-canada-2020-en

There were 100,104 abortions reported in 2015.
There were 97,764 reported in 2016.
There were 94,030 reported in 2017.
There were 85,294 reported in 2018.
There were 83,576 reported in 2019.
There were 74,155 reported in 2020.

But don’t worry. There are no doubt countless politicians and public figures working diligently to reverse this trend, right?

And what do “conservatives” in Canada have to say about this? They don’t seem to care about the millions who’ve died as a result of abortion. There’s no ideological issue with infanticide in general. However, they insist that babies not be killed simply because of their sex. This was Bill C-233, a Private Member’s Bill in the last session.

There are also major demographic implications for abortion on this scale, which needs to be addressed as well.

The topic of births and deaths is certainly important to consider. That said, including abortion — especially being so widespread — changes the dynamics considerably.

Note: Difference = Live Births – Total Deaths
Note: Per Day = (Difference)/365 or 366

Year Birth Deaths Diff Day
1991 402,533 195,569 206,964 567
1992 398,643 196,535 202,108 552
1993 388,394 204,912 183,482 503
1994 385,114 207,077 178,037 488
1995 378,016 210,733 167,283 458
1996 366,200 212,880 153,320 419
1997 348,598 215,669 132,929 364
1998 342,418 218,091 124,327 341
1999 337,249 219,530 117,719 323
2000 327,882 218,062 109,820 300
2001 333,744 219,538 114,206 313
2002 328,802 223,603 105,199 288
2003 335,202 226,169 109,033 299
2004 337,072 226,584 110,488 302
2005 342,176 230,132 112,044 307
2006 354,617 228,079 126,538 347
2007 367,864 235,217 132,647 363
2008 377,886 238,617 139,269 381
2009 380,863 238,418 142,445 390
2010 377,213 240,075 137,138 376
2011 377,636 243,511 134,125 367
2012 381,869 246,596 135,273 370
2013 380,323 252,338 127,985 350
2014 384,100 258,821 125,279 343
2015 382,392 264,333 118,059 323
2016 383,102 267,213 115,889 318
2017 379,450 276,689 102,761 281
2018 375,390 283,706 91,684 251

A few years back, it was covered how Canada had a growing population even without immigration. In fairness, it’s not clear how much of this was due to birth tourism. However, the rates weren’t plummeting as people were led to believe.

A quick and dirty estimation (based on births and abortions) would be that approximately 20% of the pregnancies — excluding miscarriages — ended up being aborted. This translated to 1 in 5.

YEAR BIRTHS ABORTIONS B + A % ABORTED
1991 402,533 95,059 497,592 19.1%
1992 398,643 102,085 500,728 20.3%
1993 388,394 104,403 492,797 21.2%
1994 385,114 106,255 491,369 21.6%
1995 378,016 108,248 486,264 22.3%
1996 366,200 111,659 477,859 23.3%
1997 348,598 111,709 460,307 24.3%
1998 342,418 110,331 452,749 24.4%
1999 337,249 105,666 442,915 23.8%
2000 327,882 105,427 433,309 24.3%
2001 333,744 106,418 440,162 24.2%
2002 328,802 105,154 433,956 24.2%
2003 335,202 103,768 438,970 23.6%
2004 337,072 100,039 447,111 22.4%
2005 342,176 96,815 438,991 22.0%
2006 354,617 91,310 445,927 20.5%
2007 367,864 98,762 466,626 21.2%
2008 377,886 95,876 473,762 20.2%
2009 380,863 93,755 474,618 19.8%
2010 377,213 *64,641 441,854 *14.6%
2011 377,636 108,844 486,480 22.3%
2012 381,869 100,958 482,827 20.9%
2013 380,323 102,446 482,769 21.2%
2014 384,100 100,194 484,294 20.7%
2015 382,392 100,104 482,496 20.7%
2016 383,102 97,764 480,866 20.3%
2017 379,450 94,030 473,480 19.9%
2018 375,390 85,294 460,684 18.5%
2019 375,229 83,576 458,805 18.2%
2020 361,667 74,155 435,822 17.0%

*2010 is skewed, since Quebec didn’t fully report their totals.

This isn’t hyperbole to claim that 20% of pregnancies in recent years end with an abortion. Slaughtering large segments of future generations has been happening for decades.

Again, 4,222,858 abortions between 1970 and 2020, and that’s just Canada. Also, these are just the official figures. Factoring in the unreported, the number is likely much higher.

Don’t worry about the falling birth rates and the slaughter of Canadian children. After all, we can just import a replacement population in order to keep up.

(1) https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1310016901
(2) https://archive.ph/OhV01
(3) https://open.canada.ca/data/en/dataset/aca40ae3-d026-45b8-8e37-9185b4347c43
(4) https://archive.ph/Y7DYZ
(5) http://run-with-life.blogspot.com/2021/03/cihi-is-still-underreporting-abortions.html
(6) https://love4life.ca/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Annual_20_203.pdf
(7) https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/n1/pub/82-223-x/82-223-x2008000-eng.pdf
(8) https://www5.statcan.gc.ca/cansim/a05?lang=eng&id=1069005
(9) https://www.cihi.ca/en/access-data-and-reports/data-tables?keyword=abortion&published_date=All&type_of_care=All&place_of_care=All&population_group=All&health_care_quality=All&health_conditions_outcomes=All&health_system_overview=All&sort_by=field_published_date_value&items_per_page=10
(10) https://www.arcc-cdac.ca/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/statistics-abortion-in-canada.pdf
(11) https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/cv.action?pid=1310042801#timeframe
(12) https://www150.statcan.gc.ca/t1/tbl1/en/tv.action?pid=1310071001
(13) https://www.parl.ca/legisinfo/en/bill/43-2/c-233
(14) http://data.un.org/Data.aspx?q=abortion+statistics&d=POP&f=tableCode%3a17
(15) https://abortion-policies.srhr.org/
(16) https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/abortion

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