U.N. Death Cult: 73 Million Abortions Annually Worldwide

The World Health Organization openly posts and discusses some pretty disturbing and messed up data on abortion worldwide. (See archive).

This expands on a recent Canuck Law article, which estimates that there have been over 4.2 million abortions just in Canada since 1970. This averages out to approximately 20% of pregnancies being willfully terminated. Few are aware of just how big this problem is.

Here are some claims W.H.O. promotes:

  • Abortion is a common health intervention. It is safe when carried out using a method recommended by WHO, appropriate to the pregnancy duration and by someone with the necessary skills.
  • Six out of 10 of all unintended pregnancies end in an induced abortion.
  • Around 45% of all abortions are unsafe, of which 97% take place in developing countries.
  • Unsafe abortion is a leading – but preventable – cause of maternal deaths and morbidities. It can lead to physical and mental health complications and social and financial burdens for women, communities and health systems.
  • Lack of access to safe, timely, affordable and respectful abortion care is a critical public health and human rights issue.

And this one is a doozy:

Around 73 million induced abortions take place worldwide each year. Six out of 10 (61%) of all unintended pregnancies, and 3 out of 10 (29%) of all pregnancies, end in induced abortion

This claim is based on work from Bearak J, Popinchalk A, Ganatra B, Moller A-B, Tunçalp Ö, Beavin C et al, which covered estimates from the years 1990 through 2019. They used a “Bayesian framework”, meaning dta on pregnancy intentions and abortion were compiled from country-based surveys, official statistics, and published studies found through a literature search. So, it’s not just a straight compilation, but estimates as well.

Of course, if this figure of 73 million, per year, is even remotely accurate, it would be somewhere between 2 and 5 billion children have been aborted since the 1970s, when the movement really took off.

Restrictive abortion regulation can cause distress and stigma, and risk constituting a violation of human rights of women and girls, including the right to privacy and the right to non-discrimination and equality, while also imposing financial burdens on women and girls. Regulations that force women to travel to attain legal care, or require mandatory counselling or waiting periods, lead to loss of income and other financial costs, and can make abortion inaccessible to women with low resources.

Estimates from 2006 show that complications of unsafe abortions cost health systems in developing countries US$ 553 million per year for post-abortion treatments. In addition, households experienced US$ 922 million in loss of income due to long-term disability related to unsafe abortion. Countries and health systems could make substantial monetary savings by providing greater access to modern contraception and quality induced abortion.

A set of scoping reviews from 2021 indicate that abortion regulations – by being linked to fertility – affect women’s education, participation on the labour market and positive contribution to GDP growth. The legal status of abortion can also affect children’s educational outcomes, and their earnings on the labour market later in life. For example, legalization of abortion – by reducing the number of unwanted pregnancies and thus increasing the likelihood that children are born wanted – can be linked to greater parental investments in children, including in girls’ schooling.

Does W.H.O. condemn the hundreds of millions — if not billions — of lives that are lost through this? Not exactly. The rights of the unborn never seem to factor into the equation.

W.H.O. attempts to make several economic arguments as to why abortion should be legal and as accessible as possible. Of course, they don’t seem to bother with addressing the long term physical and psychological impacts of women who do abort their children.

The World Health Organization also has its own division on Sexual and Reproductive Health and Research (SRH). (See archive). It’s funded both by various governments and private companies, including the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. (See archive). They always seem to be around whenever there are population reduction programs involved.

5.6 Ensure universal access to sexual and reproductive health and reproductive rights as agreed in accordance with the Programme of Action of the International Conference on population and Development and the Beijing Platform for Action and the outcome documents of their review conferences

Enshrining abortion is also written right into Agenda 2030, which was signed by “Conservative” Stephen Harper in 2015. (See archive). It’s item #5.6 on the Treaty.

One might think it strange that population control groups are interested in keeping abortion legal and readily available. Then again, once one realizes the scale of this mass infanticide, things start to make a whole lot more sense.

Furthermore, the W.H.O. and U.N. link to the U.N. Population Fund, their 2014 Programme of Action, and to the Beijing Declaration And Platform For Action. (See archive). In a sick twist, abortion is promoted as women’s rights, and pregnancy an often unwanted evil.

Of course, 50% or so of the babies who are killed would have grown up to become women. This is something that many women’s rights groups don’t get, or at least pretend they don’t.

It’s interesting that groups like the United Nations claim to be against child exploitation and human trafficking. That said, they support encourage practices that ensure the deaths of countless unborn, while their remains can be sold off for a variety of purposes.

It’s even more disturbing that the U.N. keeps detailed and up-to-date records of abortion regulations across countries. Guess it’s one way of tracking where the most victims are likely to come from.

Has abortion been stopped, or slowed over the last 2 1/2 years during this so-called pandemic? Not at all. In fact, it’s one of the few things that were still available in Canada the entire time. Sure, weddings, churches, and funerals were “non-essential”. However, abortion, weed and liquor were still accessible.

SOURCE MATERIAL
(1) https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/abortion
(2) https://canucklaw.ca/eugenics-in-canada-20-of-babies-aborted-in-pro-choice-movement/
(3) https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32710833/
(4) https://www.who.int/teams/sexual-and-reproductive-health-and-research-(srh)/human-reproduction-programme
(5) https://archive.ph/uyd8J
(6) https://www.who.int/teams/sexual-and-reproductive-health-and-research-(srh)/human-reproduction-programme/donors
(7) https://archive.ph/7tb5Q
(8) https://www.un.org/ohrlls/sites/www.un.org.ohrlls/files/2030_agenda_for_sustainable_development_web.pdf
(9) 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development web
(10) https://www.unfpa.org/publications/international-conference-population-and-development-programme-action
(11) https://www.unwomen.org/sites/default/files/Headquarters/Attachments/Sections/CSW/PFA_E_Final_WEB.pdf
(12) https://canucklaw.ca/wp-content/uploads/UN-Beijing-Declaration-And-Platform-For-Action.pdf
(13) https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/related-health-issues
(14) https://apps.who.int/iris/bitstream/handle/10665/331561/WHO-2019-nCoV-essential_health_services-2020.1-eng.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y
(15) WHO-2019-nCoV Essential Health Services 2020 March 2020
(16) WHO-2019-nCoV-essential_health_services June 2020
(17) https://www.un.org/en/development/desa/population/publications/pdf/policy/AbortionPoliciesReproductiveHealth.pdf

U.S. Customs And Border Protection: Some Statistics On The Invasion

This piece focuses on the problem that is the United States border, particularly the side with Mexico. There have been many interests vested in not securing it. Consequently, people flood in illegally, since there’s little reason not to.

Why should Canadians care about this?

The answer is simple: it’s not just an American problem. Open borders threatens the sovereignty of nations in general. Not only that, many of those illegal aliens will surely be working their way to Canada, given the generous welfare benefits available.

Unfortunately, far too few Canadians, including many “conservatives”, fail to realize that open borders changes everything. The makeup of the country impacts everything: voting patterns; finance; culture; crime; and future immigration policies. And the mantra “just come legally” misses the bigger picture.

For an earlier piece on the estimated real scale of illegals in the U.S., north of 22 million. There was also this gem in 2018, suing for the right to illegally enter the U.S.

Now, let’s get into some of the data from the USCBP, or the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. The numbers are quite shocking indeed.

A note about “fiscal year”: Fiscal Year 2022 runs October 01, 2021 – September 30, 2022. All of the years seem to be done in this format.

“Recidivism” in the context of CBP refers to the percentage of people who are detained multiple times within the same fiscal year. It’s been approximately 25% the last few years, meaning 1/4 of people caught and forced to leave are caught again. There doesn’t seem to be much of a deterrent. As for drugs being brought in:

Month Marijuana Cocaine Heroin Meth Fentanyl Other
October 2021 376 220 0 290 73 3
November 2021 191 73 0 581 84 3
December 2021 127 102 66 559 26 4
January 2022 360 39 0 457 65 56
February 2022 785 90 2 268 12 27
March 2022 58 50 2 224 13 4
April 2022 259 186 14 479 174 19

Data from the 2022 fiscal year (thus far). The C.B.P. also provides recent statistics on the drug busts that have occurred from people trying to bring narcotics into the country. While it’s nice to have these seizures, it’s likely just a drop in the bucket as to what really goes on.

AGENCY INVOLVED FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22TD
Office of Field Operations Encounters 216,370 281,881 288,523 241,786 294,352 259,057
U.S. Border Patrol Total Encounters 310,531 404,142 859,501 405,036 1,662,167 1,219,920
Total Enforcement Actions 526,901 683,178 1,148,024 646,822 1,956,519 1,478,977

For “enforcement actions”, this refers to: individuals encountered at ports of entry who are seeking lawful admission into the United States but are determined to be inadmissible, individuals presenting themselves to seek humanitarian protection under our laws, and individuals who withdraw an application for admission and return to their countries of origin within a short timeframe. This is according to the CBP’s own definition.

In other words, it’s the number of people who show up LEGALLY to border ports of entry and then are turned away. It doesn’t cover the vast numbers who enter illegally between border ports.

CATEGORY FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22TD
Office Of Field Operations
Criminal Non-Citizens 10,596 11,623 12,705 7,009 6,567 9,101
NCIC Arrests 7,656 5,929 8,546 7,108 8,979 5,580
U.S. Border Patrol
Criminal Noncitizens Encountered 8,531 6,698 4,269 2,438 10,763 5,985
Criminal Noncitizens With Warrants 2,675 1,550 4,153 2,054 1,904 525

There have also been considerable amounts of arrests for people who either had criminal records, and/or outstanding warrants. This doesn’t include people who entered without being detected.

GANG ARRESTS FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22TD
18th Street 84 47 61 145 168 36 28 66
MS-13 335 253 228 413 464 72 113 149
Paisas 73 119 53 62 90 93 79 80
Other 352 283 194 188 254 162 128 98
Total 844 702 536 808 976 363 348 393

There have also been gang-related arrests of people attempting to enter the United States. Of course, not all are included, just a few which represent the larger numbers of arrests.

Concerning arrests of suspected terrorists (all nationalities), CBP provides some data of people detained at both the Southern and Northern borders.

TERRORISTS AT BORDER FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22TD
Southern Border 116 155 280 72 103 42
Northern Border 217 196 258 124 54 115
Total 333 351 538 196 157 157

How many encounters does the U.S. Government have overall? Thankfully, they do provide more data, and a lot of it is mind blowing.

Nationwide Encounters
.
Encounter data includes U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) Title 8 Apprehensions, Office of Field Operations (OFO) Title 8 Inadmissibles, and Title 42 Expulsions for fiscal years (FY) 2020, 2021, and 2022. Data is available for the Northern Land Border, Southwest Land Border, and Nationwide (i.e., air, land, and sea modes of transportation) encounters.

FISCAL YEAR 2019 2020 2021 2022
October 60,781 45,139 71,929 164,849
November 62,469 42,643 72,113 174,849
December 70,694 40,565 73,994 179,254
January 58,317 36,585 78,414 154,816
February 76,545 36,687 101,099 165,900
March 103,731 34,460 173,277 221,144
April 109,415 17,106 178,795 234,088
May 114,116 23,237 180,597
June 104,311 33,049 189,034
July 81,777 40,929 213,593
August 62,707 50,014 209,840
TOTAL 904,863 400,414 1,542,685 1,141,054 (so far)

Once more, how many people are simply sneaking in undetected?

The data can further be broken down by the type of person/people coming:

  • Accompanied Minors (AM)
  • Individuals in a Family Unit (FMUA)
  • Single Adults
  • Unaccompanied Children (UC)

While there are clearly a lot of people who get stopped by the various departments, an awful lot don’t. They are let in through some pathway, or just sneak in.

It also doesn’t help that there are countless Sanctuary Cities and States, which do an end run around border security. If people know they can get social services without the risk of being deported, many more will come.

Again, this is not just an American issue. Many of the hordes flooding into the U.S. will eventually make their way North. Canadians should absolutely be worried about this.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

Don’t worry, there will be much more included on this subject in the near future. This can’t be done justice by a single piece.

(1) https://www.cbp.gov/
(2) https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/cbp-enforcement-statistics
(3) https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/nationwide-encounters
(4) https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/southwest-land-border-encounters
(5) https://canucklaw.ca/true-scale-of-illegals-in-us-22-million-more-amnesty-coming/
(6) https://canucklaw.ca/tsce-2-migrant-caravan-lawyers-sue-for-right-to-legally-invade-u-s/
(7) https://canucklaw.ca/tsce-10b-sanctuary-cities-an-end-run-around-having-borders/

Demographic Makeup Of People Entering Canada Illegally 2017-2021

Now for something that isn’t covered much by mainstream (or alternative) media. Who exactly is coming into Canada illegally, in between official border ports of entry? What are the numbers? Fortunately, the Immigration and Refugee Board has at least some information to share.

RANK COUNTRY INTAKE ACC REJ ABAN WD&O RESOLVED PENDING
n/a Total 60,544 25,802 18,010 1,059 3,404 49,000 11,544
1 Nigeria 16,374 4,739 7,279 189 1,785 13,992 2,382
2 Haiti 9,350 2,210 4,595 323 517 7,645 1,705
3 Colombia 3,565 1,629 486 57 117 2,289 1,276
4 Pakistan 2,406 1,184 670 21 115 1,990 416
5 DR Congo 2,165 479 416 36 145 1,076 1,089
6 Turkey 2,011 1,812 43 <20 <20 1,901 110
7 Sudan 1,694 1,372 123 25 77 1,597 97
8 Angola 1,486 420 381 <20 <20 865 621
9 Eritrea 1,224 1,004 <20 <20 105 1,178 46
19 U.S.A. 1,203 24 754 57 160 995 208
n/a All Others 19,066 10,929 3,205 308 305 15,472 3,594

ACC = Accepted
REJ = Rejected
ABAN = Abandoned
WD&O = Withdrawn And Other

**The IRB lists some totals as <20, and they claim that this is done for privacy reasons. The logic seems to be that if there were only a few who crossed, it would be easier to identify them.

The above totals are from February 2017 to December​​ 2021. The IRB claims that it didn’t have access to such information prior to this.

Isn’t this lovely, that the bulk of the people ILLEGALLY entering Canada are from the 3rd World? But let’s be fair, we don’t have nearly enough rocket scientists and brain surgeons here already. Keep in mind, these people have entered the United States — at some point — and decided to continue onwards. They’ve already passed on at least one safe country, one that gets hundreds of thousands of applications per year.

And again, this could be stopped very quickly. However, politicians (of all stripes) actively work against the interests of their own citizens.

(1) https://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/statistics/Pages/irregular-border-crossers-countries.aspx
(2) https://archive.ph/x4T1i
(3) Wayback Machine

Illegal Aliens Coming Into Canada: 2022, And Earlier

Things are picking up again, particularly in Quebec.

YEAR: 2022
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 2,367 0 16 0 2,383
February 2,154 1 9 0 2,164
March 2,492 2 8 0 2,502
TOTALS 7,013 3 33 0 7,049

It appears that illegals coming into Canada is back in full swing, not that it ever stopped. Over 7,000 people were intercepted by the RCMP in the first 3 months of 2022. Of course, this is just what’s on the books, and just what’s publicly available.

The police didn’t seem to have any issues with shutting down businesses, stopping peaceful protests, enforcing mask orders, and the like. However, enforcing borders is something they lack the willpower to do. But they do make good bellhops.

Of course, this problem has been going on for a very long time. Here are some earlier years, to show the trends. There was a significant drop (although not a complete stop) during this “pandemic” psy-op. Perhaps Government at least needs to put on appearances.

Let’s not pretend that this is an unsolvable problem. Governments could put a stop to mass illegal entries very quickly, if that was their goal. But they don’t, regardless of what party is in power.

PROVINCE/TERRITORY 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016
Newfoundland 0 0 0 0 0 0
Prince Edward Island 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nova Scotia 0 0 0 0 0 0
New Brunswick 10 5 5 ? ? 25
Quebec 1,335 1,295 785 875 1,035 2,595
Ontario 2,660 2,340 1,995 2,630 2,790 3,7935
Manitoba 20 15 25 10 225 505
Saskatchewan ? ? ? ? ? 30
Alberta 35 40 35 65 70 120
British Columbia 125 85 110 130 170 220
Yukon 0 0 0 0 0 5
Northwest Territories 0 0 0 0 0 0
Nunavut 0 0 0 0 0 0
TOTALS 4,185 3,770 2,955 3,715 4,290 7,365

Illegals were still coming into Canada via land border crossings during the Harper years. However, it’s only considered an issue when Trudeau is in power.

YEAR: 2017
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 245 19 46 5 315
February 452 142 84 0 678
March 654 170 71 2 897
April 672 146 32 9 859
May 576 106 60 0 742
June 781 63 39 1 884
July 2,996 87 51 0 3,314
August 5,530 80 102 0 5,712
September 1,720 78 79 4 1,881
October 1,755 67 68 8 1,890
November 1,539 38 46 0 1,623
December 1,916 22 40 0 1,978
TOTAL 18,836 1,018 718 22 20,593
YEAR: 2018
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 1,458 18 41 0 1,517
February 1,486 31 48 0 1,565
March 1,884 53 33 0 1,970
April 2,479 50 31 0 2,560
May 1,775 36 53 0 1,869
June 1,179 31 53 0 1,263
July 1,552 51 31 0 1,634
August 1,666 39 39 3 1,747
September 1,485 44 68 4 1,601
October 1,334 23 37 0 1,394
November 978 23 18 0 1,019
December 1,242 11 27 0 1,280
TOTAL 18,518 410 479 7 19,419
YEAR: 2019
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 871 1 16 1 888
February 800 1 6 2 808
March 967 13 22 0 1,002
April 1,206 15 25 0 1,246
May 1,149 27 20 0 1,196
June 1,536 26 5 0 1,567
July 1,835 23 15 1 1,874
August 1,712 26 22 2 1,762
September 1,706 19 17 0 1,737
October 1,595 18 8 1 1,622
November 1,118 9 21 0 1,148
December 1,646 2 5 2 1,653
TOTAL 16,136 180 182 9 16,503
YEAR: 2020
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 1,086 7 7 0 1,100
February 976 2 2 0 980
March 930 7 18 0 955
April 1 0 5 0 6
May 17 0 4 0 21
June 28 1 3 1 33
July 29 2 17 0 48
August 15 3 0 0 18
September 30 4 7 0 41
October 27 0 4 0 31
November 24 0 8 0 32
December 26 2 8 0 36
TOTAL 3,189 28 84 1 3,302
YEAR: 2021
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA B.C. OTHERS TOTAL
January 28 1 10 0 39
February 39 0 1 0 40
March 29 5 2 0 36
April 29 2 2 0 33
May 12 3 13 0 28
June 11 0 6 0 17
July 28 5 6 0 39
August 63 2 11 0 76
September 150 0 19 0 169
October 96 0 17 0 113
November 832 1 12 0 845
December 2,778 0 33 0 2,811
TOTAL 4,095 19 132 0 4,246

One can only imagine how bad the rest of 2022 will end up being with this issue. Of course, the vast scale of LEGAL immigration is a much, MUCH bigger problem than the illegal entries. That said, it’s not an issue that can be ignored.

There are of course some other points to bring up to give additional context to the subject of illegal border crossings.

Something not really reported on in 2019 was the fact that the Canadian Government scrapped the DCO, or Designated Country of Origin policy. This stopped people from 42 countries (mainly in Europe) from being able to abuse the refugee system with bogus claims.

The Parties agree to review this Agreement and its implementation. The first review shall take place not later than 12 months from the date of entry into force and shall be jointly conducted by representatives of each Party. The Parties shall invite the UNHCR to participate in this review. The Parties shall cooperate with UNHCR in the monitoring of this Agreement and seek input from non-governmental organizations.

As for the Safe 3rd Country Agreement, people are still allowed to enter, and it’s still being gamed by human smugglers and traffickers.

Section 8 of the text makes it clear that the UNHCR, or United Nations High Commission on Refugees, is a Party to this Treaty. Interestingly, this detail is never reported by the mainstream press.

In addition to the people who ILLEGALLY enter Canada, our “authorities” LEGALLY let in thousands of people each year who had initially been denied for a variety of reasons. IRPA, the Immigration and Refugee Protection Act, has at least 2 provisions to allow inadmissible people in anyway. These are sections 24(1) and 25.1(2).

Even if previously deemed inadmissible to Canada to be given Temporary Resident Permits anyway. Here are the totals from the Annual Reports to Parliament on Immigration. Note: the first one listed only started in 2010.

Those allowed in under Rule 25.1(2) of IRPA

YEAR TRP Issued Cumulative
2010 17 17
2011 53 70
2012 53 123
2013 280 403
2014 385 788
2015 1,063 1,851
2016 596 2,447
2017 555 3002
2018 669 3,671
2019 527 4,198
2020 115 4,313

From 2010 to 2020, a total of 4,313 people who were otherwise inadmissible to Canada were allowed in anyway under Rule 25.1(2) of IRPA. This is the category that Global News previously reported on. As for the other one, under Rule 24(1) of IRPA, Global News leaves that out:

Year Permits Cumulative
2002 12,630 12,630
2003 12,069 24,699
2004 13,598 38,297
2005 13,970 52,267
2006 13,412 65,679
2007 13,244 78,923
2008 12,821 91,744
2009 15,640 107,384
2010 12,452 119,836
2011 11,526 131,362
2012 13,564 144,926
2013 13,115 158,041
2014 10,624 168,665
2015 10,333 178,998
2016 10,568 189,566
2017 9,221 198,787
2018 7,132 205,919
2019 6,080 211,999
2020 2,044 214,043

From 2002 to 2020 (inclusive), a total of 214,043 people previously deemed inadmissible to Canada were given Temporary Resident Permits anyway. This has almost certainly been going on for a lot longer, but is as far back as the reports go. Now let’s consider the reasons these people are initially refused entry.

SEC = Security (espionage, subversion, terrorism)
HRV = Human or International Rights Violations
CRIM = Criminal
S.CRIM = Serious Criminal
NC = Non Compliance
MR = Misrepresentation

YEAR Total SEC HRV Crim S.Crim NC MR
2002 12,630 ? ? ? ? ? ?
2003 12,069 17 25 5,530 869 4,855 39
2004 13,598 12 12 7,096 953 4,981 20
2005 13,970 27 15 7,917 981 4,635 21
2006 13,412 29 20 7,421 982 4,387 18
2007 13,244 25 8 7,539 977 4,109 14
2008 12,821 73 18 7,108 898 4,170 17
2009 15,640 32 23 6,619 880 7,512 10
2010 12,452 86 24 6,451 907 4,423 36
2011 11,526 37 14 6,227 899 3,932 11
2012 13,564 20 15 7,014 888 5,206 18
2013 13,115 17 10 6,816 843 5,135 8
2014 10,624 12 2 5,807 716 3,895 14
2015 10,333 3 3 5,305 578 4,315 28
2016 10,568 8 4 4,509 534 2,788 20
2017 9,221 10 5 5,035 591 3,412 121
2018 7,132 5 3 4,132 559 2,299 131
2019 6,080 2 0 3,202 546 2,139 175
2020 2,044 2 1 666 131 1,000 37

In 2020, only 2,044 people barred were allowed in under Rule 24(1) of IRPA, which is the lowest it’s been since this legislation was enacted. Nonetheless, ZERO of these people should be coming in.

Interestingly, even though the Government has wide discretion to let people into the country under 24(1) and 25.1(2) of IRPA, it chose not to use its discretion to prohibit anyone from entering.

The data for these tables was compiled from the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament. They are included at the bottom as source material.

Even if people are excluded from Canada — for a variety of valid reasons — often they will still be given temporary entrance into Canada. Will they ever leave? Who knows?

Not only are people let in who shouldn’t be, but sanctuary cities like Toronto and Montreal provide social services (at taxpayer expense) to people here illegally. Do right wingers oppose this? Nope, many of them have facilitated this problem.

Of course, none of this addresses the elephant in the room: the genocidal levels of replacement migration that come in through various legal channels on visas.

It’s strange that so many who identify as conservatives or nationalists are silent on what’s going on. Worse, these gatekeepers condemn and mock people who speak up on these important issues. To all those constitutionalists out there: how will you maintain your systems of law when you are eventually outvoted by people who want very different things?

(1) https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/roxham-road-reopen-1.6257868
(2) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/processed-claims.html
(3) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2017.html
(4) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2018.html
(5) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2019.html
(6) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2020.html
(7) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2021.html
(8) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/asylum-claims/asylum-claims-2022.html
(9) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/news/2019/05/canada-ends-the-designated-country-of-origin-practice.html
(10) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/mandate/policies-operational-instructions-agreements/agreements/safe-third-country-agreement/final-text.html
(11) https://canucklaw.ca/tsce-10c-bit-of-history-doug-rob-ford-voted-in-2013-for-sanctuary-toronto-amnesty-for-illegals/

ANNUAL IMMIGRATION REPORTS TO PARLIAMENT
2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
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IMM #10(C): Review Of 2021 Annual Immigration Report To Parliament

Despite there supposedly being a global pandemic in 2020, the population replacement continues in Canada. However, it had to be slowed down (this year) to at least make things plausible. The mask is a nice touch: we need a constant reminder about this health crisis, otherwise we’d forget.

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

Despite what many think, LEGAL immigration into Canada is actually a much larger threat than illegal aliens, given the true scale of the replacement that is happening. What was founded as a European (British) colony is becoming unrecognizable due to forced demographic changes. There are also social, economic, environmental and voting changes to consider. See this Canadian series, and the UN programs for more detail. Politicians, the media, and so-called “experts” have no interest in coming clean on this.

CLICK HERE, for UN Genocide Prevention/Punishment Convention.
CLICK HERE, for Barcelona Declaration & Kalergi Plan.
CLICK HERE, for UN Kalergi Plan (population replacement).
CLICK HERE, for UN replacement efforts since 1974.
CLICK HERE, for tracing steps of UN replacement agenda.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

2. Annual Immigration Reports To Parliament

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The information in this article, and similar ones, comes directly from information provided by the Government of Canada in their annual reports. These numbers, while likely not truly accurate, are at least a good starting point.

3. Immigration Largely Controlled By Provinces

Concurrent Powers of Legislation respecting Agriculture, etc.
.
95 In each Province the Legislature may make Laws in relation to Agriculture in the Province, and to Immigration into the Province; and it is hereby declared that the Parliament of Canada may from Time to Time make Laws in relation to Agriculture in all or any of the Provinces, and to Immigration into all or any of the Provinces; and any Law of the Legislature of a Province relative to Agriculture or to Immigration shall have effect in and for the Province as long and as far only as it is not repugnant to any Act of the Parliament of Canada.

Contrary to popular belief, immigration is largely set by the Provinces. This is laid out in Section 95 of the Constitution. While Ottawa may impose laws from time to time, the understanding seems to be that the Premiers will be mostly the decision makers. While it’s understandable to get angry at Trudeau, he’s far from the only deserving target.

Additionally, there are talks underway to launch a Municipal Nominee Program, which will allow cities to directly bring people in, and to sponsor their bids to become permanent residents. It’s unclear at this point how large it will ultimately be.

4. Key Highlights From The Year 2020

AS stated before, it’s not entirely clear how many people are staying after some kind of temporary visa, v.s. how many leave. We also don’t have hard data on the “inadmissibles” who don’t leave, and on the visitors who overstay. Consequently, take this as a rough estimate:

184,606 new permanent residents
-51,101 temps transitioning to PR
=133,505 new permanent residents brought into Canada

Temporaries Brought Into Canada
256,740 (Student Visas Issued)
+84,609 (Temporary Foreign Worker Program)
+242,130 (International Mobility Program)
= 583,452 (in the temporary classes)

2,044 “inadmissibles” allowed under Rule 24(1) of IRPA
115 “inadmissibles” allowed under Rule 25.2(1) of IRPA

648,789 eTAs (electronic travel authorizations)
257,330 TRV (temporary resident visas)

How many people remained in Canada? Who knows?

The Government brags about expediting work permits for “essential workers”, even as Canada experienced record high unemployment. They even created a program for “refugees” to get accelerated permanent residence if they work in health care settings. This comes at a time when Canadian workers are being let go for refusing the experimental shots.

Foreign students (under a rule change) became exempt from the 20 hour/week work limit that their visas typically imposed. Supposedly, this was to enable them to provide essential services. Again, this seems screwed up given how many Canadians were forced out of work.

Foreign students also received emergency benefits designed for Canadians, although the full extent of this is not yet published.

In January 2020, the G.T.A./IIRC started their program to give out permanent residencies to 500 people — and their families — who had overstayed their initial visas. This could be interpreted as an amnesty-for-illegals program, and we’ll have to see how much it expands.

IIRC also extended the Interim Federal Health Program, or IFHP, which is a plan that also covers so-called asylum claimants. This applies also to people who’ve illegally entered from the United States. Some 14% of claimants in 2020 had entered the country illegally, primarily via Roxham Road.

There’s also an initiative underway to bring in large numbers of people from Hong Kong, who claim to be fleeing persecution. Interesting, as Canada doesn’t seem to be run much better these days.

The Rainbow Refugee Assistance Program is supposed to grow from 15 to 50. This is to resettle people alleging they are persecuted because of their questionable behaviours.

Canada also will allow people (women primarily) fleeing domestic violence to get a temporary permit, with a the possibility of becoming a permanent resident. There isn’t any information given about whether the abuser will be deported.

There is, of course, the usual GBA+ nonsense in the report.

5. Continued Population Replacement

(Page 18 of the 2004 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 24 of the 2005 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 18, 19 of the 2006 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 19, 20 of the 2007 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 21, 22 of the 2008 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 16 of the 2009 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 14 of the 2010 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 18 of the 2011 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 15 of the 2012 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 19 of the 2013 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 16 of the 2014 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 16 of the 2015 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 10 of the 2016 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 14 of the 2017 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 28 of the 2018 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 36 of the 2019 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 33 of the 2020 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 36 of the 2021 Annual Report to Parliament)

Ever get the sense that people are European descent are being replaced? It’s no coincidence. The plan for decades has been to bring in large numbers of people from the 3rd World (mostly Asia and Africa), to remake society.

As usual, the top 3 are: (a) India; (b) China; and (c) The Philippines. No surprise that the enclaves in Canada are growing. More data from the recent census will be released later this year, and the results shouldn’t be a shock to anyone.

6. Temporary Visitors To Canada

TRV = Temporary Resident Visa
eTA = Electronic Travel Authorization

YEAR TRV Issued eTA Issued Totals
2016 1,347,898 2,605,077 3,952,975
2017 1,617,222 4,109,918 5,570,197
2018 1,898,324 4,125,909 6,024,233
2019 1,696,871 4,077,471 5,774,342
2020 257,330 648,789 906,119

Travelers entering Canada dropped by 85% in 2020, compared to 2019, according to the Government’s data. Now, if we could just do that to visa holders, and make it permanent.

7. More “Inadmissibles” Let Into Canada

Broadly speaking, there are two provisions within IRPA, the Immigrant and Refugee Protection Act, that allow people who were previously deemed inadmissible to Canada to be given Temporary Resident Permits anyway. Here are the totals from the Annual Reports to Parliament on Immigration. Note: the first one listed only started in 2010.

Those allowed in under Rule 25.1(2) of IRPA

YEAR TRP Issued Cumulative
2010 17 17
2011 53 70
2012 53 123
2013 280 403
2014 385 788
2015 1,063 1,851
2016 596 2,447
2017 555 3002
2018 669 3,671
2019 527 4,198
2020 115 4,313

From 2010 to 2020, a total of 4,313 people who were otherwise inadmissible to Canada were allowed in anyway under Rule 25.1(2) of IRPA. This is the category that Global News previously reported on. As for the other one, under Rule 24(1) of IRPA, Global News leaves that out:

Year Permits Cumulative
2002 12,630 12,630
2003 12,069 24,699
2004 13,598 38,297
2005 13,970 52,267
2006 13,412 65,679
2007 13,244 78,923
2008 12,821 91,744
2009 15,640 107,384
2010 12,452 119,836
2011 11,526 131,362
2012 13,564 144,926
2013 13,115 158,041
2014 10,624 168,665
2015 10,333 178,998
2016 10,568 189,566
2017 9,221 198,787
2018 7,132 205,919
2019 6,080 211,999
2020 2,044 214,043

From 2002 to 2020 (inclusive), a total of 214,043 people previously deemed inadmissible to Canada were given Temporary Resident Permits anyway. This has almost certainly been going on for a lot longer, but is as far back as the reports go. Now let’s consider the reasons these people are initially refused entry.

SEC = Security (espionage, subversion, terrorism)
HRV = Human or International Rights Violations
CRIM = Criminal
S.CRIM = Serious Criminal
NC = Non Compliance
MR = Misrepresentation

YEAR Total SEC HRV Crim S.Crim NC MR
2002 12,630 ? ? ? ? ? ?
2003 12,069 17 25 5,530 869 4,855 39
2004 13,598 12 12 7,096 953 4,981 20
2005 13,970 27 15 7,917 981 4,635 21
2006 13,412 29 20 7,421 982 4,387 18
2007 13,244 25 8 7,539 977 4,109 14
2008 12,821 73 18 7,108 898 4,170 17
2009 15,640 32 23 6,619 880 7,512 10
2010 12,452 86 24 6,451 907 4,423 36
2011 11,526 37 14 6,227 899 3,932 11
2012 13,564 20 15 7,014 888 5,206 18
2013 13,115 17 10 6,816 843 5,135 8
2014 10,624 12 2 5,807 716 3,895 14
2015 10,333 3 3 5,305 578 4,315 28
2016 10,568 8 4 4,509 534 2,788 20
2017 9,221 10 5 5,035 591 3,412 121
2018 7,132 5 3 4,132 559 2,299 131
2019 6,080 2 0 3,202 546 2,139 175
2020 2,044 2 1 666 131 1,000 37

In 2020, only 2,044 people barred were allowed in under Rule 24(1) of IRPA, which is the lowest it’s been since this legislation was enacted. Nonetheless, ZERO of these people should be coming in.

Interestingly, even though the Government has wide discretion to let people into the country under 24(1) and 25.1(2) of IRPA, it chose not to use its discretion to prohibit anyone from entering.

Even if people are excluded from Canada — for a variety of valid reasons — often they will still be given temporary entrance into Canada. Will they ever leave? Who knows?

8. Students & Temporary Workers

Year Stu TFWP IMP Total
2003 61,293 82,151 143,444

2004 56,536 90,668 147,204

2005 57,476 99,146 156,622

2006 61,703 112,658 174,361

2007 64,636 165,198 229,834

2008 79,509 192,519 272,028

2009 85,140 178,478 263,618

2010 96,157 182,276 278,433

2011 98,383 190,842 289,225

2012 104,810 213,573 318,383

2013 111,865 221,310 333,175

2014 127,698 95,086 197,924 420,078

2015 219,143 73,016 175,967 468,126

2016 265,111 78,402 207,829 551,342

2017 317,328 78,788 224,033 620,149

2018 356,876 84,229 255,034 696,139

2019 402,427 98,310 306,797 807,534

2020 256,740 84,609 242,130 583,452

Stu = Student Visa
TFWP = Temporary Foreign Worker Program
IMP = International Mobility Program

Even during a “global pandemic” there were still 583,452 international student and temporary worker visas issued. This does represent a drop of about 28% from the 807,534 that came in 2019. Still, this is a staggering large number.

There are, of course, a number of pathways to remain in Canada longer and/or transition in permanent residence. Let’s not pretend that they’re all leaving afterwards. In fact, recent changes have allowed students to remain in their home countries while collecting time towards a PR designation here.

9. Illegals Entering Via U.S./Canada Border

Although the report focused primarily on LEGAL immigration into Canada, the illegal brand is still worth talking about, since so few actually do. The United Nations gives detailed instructions and guidance on how to go about circumventing the border. The result, quite predictably, is that people keep trying to cross over.

YEAR: 2019
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA British Columbia OTHERS TOTAL
January 871 1 16 1 888
February 800 1 6 2 808
March 967 13 22 0 1,002
April 1,206 15 25 0 1,246
May 1,149 27 20 0 1,196
June 1,536 26 5 0 1,567
July 1,835 23 15 1 1,874
August 1,712 26 22 2 1,762
September 1,706 19 17 0 1,737
October 1,595 18 8 1 1,622
November 1,118 9 21 0 1,148
December 1,646 2 5 2 1,653
TOTAL 16,136 180 182 9 16,503
YEAR: 2020
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA British Columbia OTHERS TOTAL
January 1,086 7 7 0 1,100
February 976 2 2 0 980
March 930 7 18 0 955
April 1 0 5 0 6
May 17 0 4 0 21
June 28 1 3 1 33
July 29 2 17 0 48
August 15 3 0 0 18
September 30 4 7 0 41
October 27 0 4 0 31
November 24 0 8 0 32
December 26 2 8 0 36
TOTAL 3,189 28 84 1 3,302
YEAR: 2021
MONTH QUEBEC MANITOBA British Columbia OTHERS TOTAL
January 28 1 10 0 39
February 39 0 1 0 40
March 29 5 2 0 36
April 29 2 2 0 33
May 12 3 13 0 28
June 11 0 6 0 17
July 28 5 6 0 39
August 63 2 11 0 76
September 150 0 19 0 169
October 96 0 17 0 113
November 832 1 12 0 845
December 2,778 0 33 0 2,811
TOTAL 4,095 19 132 0 4,246

Although not listed in the Annual Immigration Report to Parliament, this is worth a mention. Illegal crossings from the U.S. did drop quite drastically in the Spring of 2020. Of course, the Government had to play along and make this “pandemic” seem real. In recent months, however, it seems the numbers are creeping back up again.

Keep in mind, the text of the Safe Third Country Agreement requires both Canada and the U.S. to consult with the UNHCR on refugees, and to get input from NGOs. We haven’t had meaningful borders in a long time.

As a reminder: the Trudeau Government scrapped the DCO, or Designated Country of Origin, back in 2019. This would allow for claims from “safe” countries to be denied much more quickly. However, with things the way they are, it seems nowhere is really safe. While the issue was very mainstream from 2017 to 2019, it seems to have disappeared.

In June 2020, a new policy kicked in to finally track who is leaving the country. Even more strange that a Trudeau would bring it in when he did. Probably to make it harder for people fleeing his regime.

Overall, the replacement agenda slowed down in 2020, but it’s about to be kicked back into overdrive. Not a good situation to be in.

Recent Expenses, Source Countries Of People Entering Canada Illegally

Even though the mainstream press has largely stopped covering the issue, people are still coming into Canada illegally, and we are still covering their expenses.

While our Government and media routinely distract with fear-porn about a non-existent virus, the important issue of border security seems to have disappeared. Admittedly, it has been neglected here on this site as well.

In any event, let’s look at some recent information about the costs associated with this virtue signaling. Keep in mind, this is not a complicated issue. Governments could put a stop to this problem overnight if they wanted to. The only reasonable conclusion is that they want to “appear” to be helpless, while ensuring this continues.

INSTITUTION/PLACE DATE AMOUNT
Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development Apr. 25, 2018 – Mar. 31, 2019 $900,000
ARK Group DMCC Mar. 16, 2020 – May 31, 2021 $999,894
CCFC – Christian Children’s Fund of Canada Mar. 21, 2017 – Dec. 31, 2021 $12,671,151
City of Hamilton (Government) Aug. 2, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $220,000
City of Ottawa (Government) Apr. 5, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $7,000,000
City of Toronto (Government) Jul. 31, 2018 – Mar. 31, 2019 $26,000,000
City of Toronto (Government) May 10, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $45,000,000
City of Toronto (Government) Aug. 29, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $17,000,000
City of Toronto (Government) Apr. 1, 2020 – Mar. 31, 2021 $23,000,000
City of Toronto (Government) Apr. 1, 2020 – Mar. 31, 2021 $16,000,000
City of Ottawa (Government) Jun. 26, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $10,100,000
City Of Victoria (Government) May 15, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $6,000,000
International Organization for Migration 2013-2014 Project $3,087,839
International Organization for Migration Dec. 7, 2015 – Dec. 31, 2018 $10,000,000
International Organization for Migration April 2018 to April 2019 $22,000
International Organization for Migration Feb. 1, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2023 $15,000,000
International Organization for Migration Mar. 15, 2019 – Mar. 15, 2020 $19,500
International Organization for Migration Mar. 26, 2019 – Mar. 26, 2020 $50,000
International Organization for Migration Jun. 24, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2023 $2,219,042
International Organization for Migration Mar. 12, 2020 – Sep. 30, 2023 $1,199,636
Nakache, Delphine (University of Ottawa) Mar. 15, 2018 $213,936
Province of Manitoba (Government) Jul. 31, 2018 – Mar. 31, 2019 $3,000,000
Province of Manitoba (Government) Aug. 21, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $5,000,000
Province of Quebec (Government) Aug. 29, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $250,000,000
Province of Quebec (Government) Apr. 1, 2020 – Mar. 31, 2021 $94,000,000
Province of Quebec (Government) Apr. 1, 2020 – Mar. 31, 2021 $30,000,000
Regional Municipality of Peel (Government) Aug. 21, 2019 – Mar. 31, 2020 $2,200,000
United Nation High Commissioner for Refugees Mar. 29, 2019 – Mar. 29, 2020 $50,000

Some of these grants are worth a look in closer detail. Keep in mind, this is just what’s getting flagged by “irregular”. There is most likely more money coming from other sources.

With the International Organization for Migration, it looks like we are handing out cash to facilitate the illegal movement of people. It doesn’t seem like prevention at all.

To enhance awareness of key communities in Central America of the risks associated with irregular pathways of migration and of the options available for regular migration, including to Canada;
.
To strengthen capacity of local government agencies and stakeholders in the target countries to develop information campaign strategies to better inform communities on safe and regular migration pathways and risks of irregular migration.

As one example (albeit a small one), Canadian taxpayers sent $50,000 to Costa Rica. The idea was to discourage them from coming illegally, but to inform them of the litany of methods to enter Canada legally.

This grant will support UNODC to strengthen the migration management capacity of Nigeria through technical assistance in the areas of national migration /immigration policies and procedures, deterring irregular migration, and improving data collection and analysis related to human trafficking and migrant smuggling.

Another grant sent $1.2 million to Nigeria, to combat human smuggling and trafficking. At least that was the stated goal. However, consider the large numbers of Nigerians simply coming across the border from the United States, it seems more like we just subsidized their travel.

In fact, Nigerians have been the largest group to enter Canada illegally over the last few years.

ORIGIN INTAKE ACCEPTED REJECTED PENDING
Total 59,384 22,591 16,152 17,555
Nigeria 16,187 4,120 6,777 4,658
Haiti 9,236 1,861 4,205 2,655
Columbia 3,425 1,269 420 1,599
Pakistan 2,343 918 505 800
Democratic Republic of Congo 2,094 362 292 1,328

Note: This doesn’t count withdrawn and abandoned claims.

All of this since 2017, according to the IRB. People can just stroll through the border (and this happens often) at Roxham Road. A serious country would turn them away, not shell out millions for locals to feed and house them.

The United States is such a dangerous country, we are told. However, they get tens of thousands (or more) of asylum claims every year. Strange that people are so willing to flock to an unsafe place. Unless of course, this is all about shopping around for better benefits and living conditions.

Despite all the talk about the border being closed with the U.S., that isn’t true at all. People are still able to come in and pretend to be refugees. The only real difference is that Roxham Road has been converted into a normal border port, and is processing illegal aliens.

As a sign of where things are heading, consider this recent announcement. Refugee claimants (people waiting for a hearing), who have accumulated enough hours working in health care can apply to stay. This seems to also apply to people who entered the country illegally. There seems to be no standards in who we let into this field.

This applies to both pending and failed (yes failed) asylum applicants. If they have enough hours, they can apply for permanent residence. The hours required is the same as for health care workers on visas: (120 between March and August 2020, and either 750 hours or 30 hour/week for 6 months).

It’s a bit of a meme that we have doctors, scientists and engineers flooding the borders. Apparently, this is what’s actually happening.

At a time when health care workers are being terminated for refusing to take the experimental shots, a replacement work force is coming in. The catch seems to be a lack of concern for bodily autonomy. This problem is likely to just get worse.

More to come on this long neglected topic.

(1) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc
(2) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/cic,094-2018-2019-Q4-D198772004,current
(3) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/cic,094-2019-2020-Q4-D208778003,current
(4) https://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/statistics/Pages/irregular-border-crossers-countries.aspx
(5) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/healthcare-workers-permanent-residence.html
(6) https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/services/refugees/healthcare-workers-permanent-residence/eligibility.html#s3

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