Some Thoughts On Leslyn Lewis’ Pro-Paris Accord PhD Dissertation

Leslyn Lewis finished her PhD dissertation in May 2019 from York University, in Toronto. It covered a number of legal areas around climate change, the Paris Accord, intellectual property, and trade agreements. Months after finishing, she ran for the leadership of the CPC, as Andrew Scheer had been forced out.

1. About Leslyn Lewis’ PhD Dissertation

To start out: the quality of the writing is very good. The content is well organized and the paper well cited. This wasn’t just some mess hastily thrown together. This is not to question her reading or writing abilities — which are impressive — but to ask ideologically what she stands for.

However, the concern now starts to creep in. This wasn’t some undergraduate paper written 20 or 30 years ago, but Lewis’ PhD dissertation. She finished it in 2019, at the age of 48.

From the content of the paper, it seems clear that Lewis fully embraces the climate change scam as a reality. She supports the Paris Agreement, despite its explicit and repeated focus on “climate finance, and its focus on “alternative energy sources”. She appears to have bought into the green agenda. The paper itself discusses (among other things), how trade agreements and intellectual property disputes can impede efforts to fight climate change.

Less than a year later, Lewis, (a political unknown), would be running for the Conservative Party of Canada leadership. She finished 3rd. Like most “conservatives”, she sings the praises of the UNSDA and Paris Accord, only objecting to a Carbon tax.

Lewis also calls herself a “social conservative”, but was once a Director at LEAF, the Women’s Legal Education & Action Fund. LEAF is a pro-death, anti-family organization.

2. Offshoring, Globalization, Free Trade

The other posts on outsourcing/offshoring are available here. It focuses on the hidden costs and trade offs society as a whole has to make. Contrary to what many politicians and figures in the media claim, there are always costs to these kinds of agreement. These include: (a) job losses; (b) wages being driven down; (c) undercutting of local companies; (d) legal action by foreign entities; (e) industries being outsourced; (f) losses to communities when major employers leave; and (g) loss of sovereignty to foreign corporations and governments. Intellectual property also becomes a tricky issue. Don’t believe the lies that these agreements are overwhelmingly beneficial to all.

3. Debunking The Climate Change Scam

The entire climate change industry, (and yes, it is an industry) is a hoax perpetrated by the people in power, run by international bankers. Plenty has also been covered on the climate scam, the propaganda machine in action, and some of the court documents in Canada. Carbon taxes are just a small part of the picture, and conservatives are intentionally sabotaging their court cases.

4. Quotes From Lewis’ 2019 Dissertation

The dissertation consists of several chapters, each with its own abstract. The document itself is large enough to stand alone as a book. This review doesn’t really do justice to the volume of writing, but outlines the more interesting parts.

(screenshots from the dissertation)

[Page 112]
ABSTRACT
Climate change abatement strategies are intrinsically linked to policies that encourage the use of alternative energy sources such as renewable energies. The importance of these strategies has been entrenched in various World Trade Organization (WTO) treaties including the Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures (“SCM Agreement”), Agreement on Trade-related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (“TRIPS”), Agreement on Trade-Related Investment Measures (“TRIMs”), as well as pre-WTO treaties like the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (“GATT”). The issue of environmental subsides, specifically renewable energy subsidies, have resurfaced in a number of disputes before the WTO Dispute Settlement Body since its first green subsidy case, brought in 2010 by Japan against Canada’s Feed-In Tariff Program (“FIT Program”). In the initial case, Japan alleged that the Ontario FIT Program’s local content requirement was discriminatory against foreign renewable energy products. Moreover, discrimination amounted to a prohibited subsidy under the SCM Agreement and was simultaneously contrary to the most favourable nation status (“MFN”) under the GATT. This decision raises concern about whether the SCM Agreement poses a barrier to governmental policies promoting FIT Programs to encourage renewable energy usage and its impact on the developing world. Specifically, do treaties like the SCM Agreement impede the development of government climate change abatement policies by requiring these programs to meet a minimum standard of trade compliance? Should WTO treaties like the SCM Agreement be amended to include flexibilities to combat climate change, especially in light of the goals set in the 2015 Paris Agreement on climate change? This paper will review the WTO subsidy rules and query whether flexibilities need to be entertained within the area of nonactionable subsidies. This mode of inquiry questions whether FIT Programs be classified as subsidies under the SCM Agreement. If FIT Programs are properly classified as subsidies, should these initiatives be granted an exemption under the SCM Agreement on the basis of public policy— with the goal of facilitating affordable renewable energy and climate change abatement in the developing world?

For better or for worse, there are a number of trade regulations, such as those imposed by the World Trade Organization. These set out guidelines for international trade. Lewis makes an argument that perhaps exceptions should be put into such rules in certain circumstances. In this case, she specifically refers to climate change and complying with the Paris Agreement.

[Page 171]
ABSTRACT
Intellectual property law was constructed to facilitate innovation and development by granting a limited monopoly in exchange for the public’s right to use an invention after the period of exclusivity expires. The trade-off of granting intellectual property protections in reward for the investment in an invention is intended to be a temporary benefit. Trade secrets have been thought of as the weakest form of intellectual property, because non-disclosure is the only form of protection. In other words, infringement of a trade secret occurs upon the unauthorized disclosure of the secret. However, absent reverse engineering and/or legitimate disclosure, protection over trade secrets may arguably extend the exclusivity rights in perpetuity. The debate on “evergreening” has focused largely on extending the life cycle of pharmaceutical patents to the omission of other forms of intellectual property, like trade secrets. The concept has also been widely ignored in relation to climate change abatement technologies. In this regard, considerations around evergreening and trade secrets have been substantially neglected. The loophole in international intellectual property treaties, like Trade Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (“TRIPS”), may lead to inequalities between industrial nations and developing ones, especially for products like photovoltaic solar panels that rely heavily on trade-secret protection. In addition, this non-disclosure may also impact on green technology transfer and may impede climate change abatement strategies in the developing world. This paper will explore the practice of evergreening as it relates to the prospect that trade secret protection may extend beyond the 20-year limit, as prescribed in TRIPS, and the implications of this practice for developing countries that seek to meet climate change commitments as outlined in the 2016 Paris Climate Change Agreement (the “Paris Agreement”). Arguably, the absence of a fixed statutory period for trade secrets may enable patent owners to participate in creative ways to “evergreen” their products or processes, with the result of extending the life-cycle. The practice of evergreening through trade secrets may have a negative impact on the ability of developing nations to meet their national climate change objectives. Specifically, international treaties like TRIPS, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, 1994 (“GATT”), the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (the “UNFCCC”), and the Paris Agreement, have attempted to incorporate climate change flexibilities that assist developing countries in meeting their climate change goals. The efficacy of technology transfer provisions in international law will be examined within the context of how the lack of a fixed term for trade secrets impacts on actual green technology transfer. It will canvass whether trade secret protection of off-patent green technologies acts as an inadvertent barrier to technology transfer within the developing world.

Intellectual property is what it sounds like. When a person creates or discovers things, they have certain rights to it. This makes sense. Patents prevent others from scooping and using another’s inventions, at least for a number of years. Trademarks or copyright prevent others from using creations or designs (subject to fair dealing limitations).

Lewis raises the argument of making exceptions to these IP laws if they were used for a “greater good”, such as combatting climate change.

[Page 245]
ABSTRACT
A number of Conference of Parties (“COP”) to the United Nations Framework on Climate Change (“the UNFCCC”) have addressed the issue of climate change and its effect on the developing world. Energy insecurity must be addressed as a precondition to sustainable development, along with the regional factors that pose legal and institutional barriers to implementing of green energy projects in sub-Saharan Africa. Many sub-Saharan African nations have enacted renewable energy laws and regulations to increase investor confidence in green energy projects. Despite current regulatory enhancements, investors are still reluctant to invest in the region due to financing and political risks. Climate financing could potentially address investor concerns, however, initiatives like the Green Climate Fund (“GC Fund”) and the African Climate Change Fund need to be implemented in a manner that promotes confidence among investors in these high capital projects. Arguably, for climate financing to achieve its full potential in sub-Saharan Africa it must be implemented in an innovative fashion that contemplates the infrastructure, environment and social governance for investments as well as fulfilling the dual goal of development and balancing national commitments under the Paris Climate Change Agreement (COP 21).

In this chapter Lewis goes on to make the argument that “climate financing”, (which really means a variety of Carbon taxes), should be implemented in order to fulfill the Paris Agreement and promote development in the 3rd World.

Lewis doesn’t seem to have an issue with intellectual property or trade regulations on principle. She just argues that exceptions should be made for fighting climate change.

These, of course, are just abstracts of a few chapters, not the entire dissertation. The whole document is quite long, nearly 400 pages when all the references and citations are added in.

5. Paris Accord Will Kill Oil & Gas Industry

Just read Article #9…..

Article 9
1. Developed country Parties shall provide financial resources to assist developing country Parties with respect to both mitigation and adaptation in continuation of their existing obligations under the Convention.

2. Other Parties are encouraged to provide or continue to provide such support voluntarily.

3. As part of a global effort, developed country Parties should continue to take the lead in mobilizing climate finance from a wide variety of sources, instruments and channels, noting the significant role of public funds, through a variety of actions, including supporting country-driven strategies, and taking into account the needs and priorities of developing country Parties. Such mobilization of climate finance should represent a progression beyond previous efforts.

4. The provision of scaled-up financial resources should aim to achieve a balance between adaptation and mitigation, taking into account country-driven strategies, and the priorities and needs of developing country Parties, especially those that are particularly vulnerable to the adverse effects of climate change and have significant capacity constraints, such as the least developed countries and small island developing States, considering the need for public and grant-based resources for adaptation.

5. Developed country Parties shall biennially communicate indicative quantitative and qualitative information related to paragraphs 1 and 3 of this Article, as applicable, including, as available, projected levels of public financial resources to be provided to developing country Parties. Other Parties providing resources are encouraged to communicate biennially such information on a voluntary basis.

6. The global stocktake referred to in Article 14 shall take into account the relevant information provided by developed country Parties and/or Agreement bodies on efforts related to climate finance.

7. Developed country Parties shall provide transparent and consistent information on support for developing country Parties provided and mobilized through public interventions biennially in accordance with the modalities, procedures and guidelines to be adopted by the Conference of the Parties serving as the meeting of the Parties to this Agreement, at its first session, as stipulated in Article 13, paragraph 13. Other Parties are encouraged to do so.

8. The Financial Mechanism of the Convention, including its operating entities, shall serve as the financial mechanism of this Agreement.

9. The institutions serving this Agreement, including the operating entities of the Financial Mechanism of the Convention, shall aim to ensure efficient access to financial resources through simplified approval procedures and enhanced readiness support for developing country Parties, in particular for the least developed countries and small island developing States, in the context of their national climate strategies and plans.

Paris Agreement Full Text

That is, of course, just Article 9. Here is an earlier review. Claiming to be able to implement the Paris Accord without Carbon taxes is disingenuous, as large parts of the Agreement specifically refer to climate finance.

While many could claim that they never actually read the Agreement, Lewis’ dissertation revolves around this and the Sustainable Development Agenda. She quotes it at length. She has clearly read and understood what is going on. The dissertation is very well written, and it’s clear a lot of work went into it.

So what does Leslyn Lewis actually believe when it comes to climate change, the Paris Agreement, and various UN taxes? Who knows?

Note: Since Lewis did run to become head of the CPC (and official Opposition Leader), and since she is still running for office, she is a public figure.

As an side: Alberta MP Garnett Genuis tried to defend voting for the Paris Agreement in 2017. It didn’t go well. Here is a clip of him with Ezra Levant from Rebel News.

Google Lobbying: Smart Thermostats; Digital Taxes; Smart Cities; 5G Infrastructure; Content Regulation

Google has been officially registered to lobby the Federal Government since 2008. But don’t worry, it’s not like it will lead to major laws getting changed, or anything like that. Canuck Law is a serious site, and does not tolerate conspiracy theories.

1. Developments In Free Speech Struggle

There is already a lot of information on the free speech series on the site. Free speech, while an important topic, doesn’t stand on its own, and is typically intertwined with other categories. For background information for this, please visit: Digital Cooperation; the IGF, or Internet Governance Forum; ex-Liberal Candidate Richard Lee; the Digital Charter; big tech collusion in coronavirus; Dominic LeBlanc’s proposal, and Facebook lobbying.

2. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for Google & smart thermostats.
https://archive.is/TaD59

CLICK HERE, for Google’s major lobbying agenda.
https://archive.is/2NNky

CLICK HERE, for recent Google lobbying communications reports.
https://archive.is/v0jDY

CLICK HERE, for WHO working with social media to censor.
https://archive.is/VlN8K
CLICK HERE, for WHO launches Rakuten Viber misinfo app.
https://archive.is/fWfYY
CLICK HERE, for WHO launches Facebook misinfo app.
https://archive.is/PRIHD

3. Google And Smart Thermostats

Google is currently in talks with the Federal Government if they install energy efficient or “smart” thermostats, and potential rebates. Presumably, these rebates would be financed by tax dollars or additional debt.

4. Google Lobbying On Many Subjects

Subject Matter Details
Legislative Proposal, Bill or Resolution
-Copyright Act, in respect of amendments related to user rights and intermediary liability.
-Copyright Act, in respect of reforms to the Copyright Board of Canada
-Income Tax Act, in respect of a proposed ‘digital renovation tax credit’ for small and medium sized businesses.
-Income Tax Act, specifically expanding section 19 to cover digital advertising.
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Policies or Program
Broadcasting policy, specifically related to governing online content.
COVID-19 pandemic, more specifically potential collaboration between the Government of Canada and Google on remote work practices, chatbots, community mobility reports, and network infrastructure.
-Consideration of the creation of a Government digital service, a central office to coordinate digital transformation of the Government of Canada
-Government of Canada consultation on Canadian Content in a Digital World
Immigration and visa policies, specifically policies that will promote and maintain a highly-skilled workforce.
-Innovation policy, specifically policies or programs related to the adoption of technology by small and medium-sized enterprises.
-Intellectual Property Strategy, as it relates to intangible assets.
-Internet advertising policy, specifically the adoption of digital media and advertising by government.
-Internet policy, specifically as it relates to cyber-security and national security.
-Internet policy, specifically the implementation of policy affecting the governance of the internet.
-Policies that would encourage growth of The Toronto-Waterloo Region Corridor, an 100-km stretch that is the second largest technology cluster in North America and is a global centre of talent, growth, innovation and discovery
-Procurement policy, specifically policy related to the provision of technology services by the Government of Canada.
-Providing feedback to a Canada Revenue Agency employee on draft government communications training program
-Public service polices to create greater digital skills
-Public service policies to encourage more open government
-Taxation policy, specifically proposed changes to the taxation of technology companies.
Technological developments related to artificial intelligence.
-Technology policy, specifically promoting the development of technological infrastructure through the Smart Cities Challenge.
.
Policies or Program, Regulation
The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), specifically provisions related to intellectual property and digital trade.

These are the things that Google is currently in talks with the Federal Government in order to implement.

It would be nice to have more information on what “network infrastructure” actually meant, but most people can probably guess what it is.

5. Google Lobbying Canadian Politicians

Former Facebook lobbyist, and current CPC leader, Erin O’Toole, was lobbied twice in 2018 by Google.

This is hardly an exhaustive list. Members of all parties have been lobbied for years by Google. There are some 300 communications reports listed in the Lobbying Registry.

6. WHO Partners With Social Media

WHO is working with manufacturers and distributors of personal protective equipment to ensure a reliable supply of the tools health workers need to do their job safely and effectively.

But we’re not just fighting an epidemic; we’re fighting an infodemic.

Fake news spreads faster and more easily than this virus, and is just as dangerous.

That’s why we’re also working with search and media companies like Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Tencent, Twitter, TikTok, YouTube and others to counter the spread of rumours and misinformation.

We call on all governments, companies and news organizations to work with us to sound the appropriate level of alarm, without fanning the flames of hysteria.

The World Health Organization openly admits to partnering with social media companies to “combat misinformation” related to this so-called pandemic. It was mid-February that this Munich Conference happened. On March 31, the Rakuten Viber app was launched by WHO, and on April 15, a Facebook app was set.

Misinformation, of course, is simply anything that conflicts with the ever-shifting official narrative.

7. Google Supports Free Speech On YouTube

Google demonstrates its commitment to free speech, by hiring 10,000 people to scrub videos from YouTube (which Google owns). Nothing to worry about, as only hateful and extremist content will be erased.

8. Nothing To See Here, People

Despite the vast array of subjects which Google is lobbying the Federal Government on, there is no need to be concerned. There is nothing malevolent about it. After all, Google would never lie or mislead.

In fact, social media companies are following the lead of the World Health Organization to ensure that only the official sources of information get released to the public.

Please move along.

UN Global Internet Governance Forum, Meeting Since 2006

Getting your own politicians to protect free speech is difficult enough. How does it work when the rules are being drafted by unelected officials in other countries?

1. Important Developments On Free Speech

There is already a lot of information on the free speech series on the site. Free speech, while an important topic, doesn’t stand on its own, and is typically intertwined with other categories. For background information for this, please visit: Digital Cooperation; ex-Liberal Candidate Richard Lee; the Digital Charter, big tech collusion in coronavirus, and Dominic LeBlanc’s proposal.

IF you think that Canadian laws don’t do enough to protect free speech in general, or online free speech more specifically, just wait until it is regulated globally.

2. IGF Meetings Held Since 2006

2006: Athens, Greece, https://archive.is/g2NnZ
2007: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, https://archive.is/uiFsE
2008: Hyderabad, India, https://archive.is/6rV0k
2009: Sharm El Sheikh, Egypt, https://archive.is/dS2SO
2010: Vilnius, Lithuania, https://archive.is/uzC3U
2011: Nairobi, Kenya, https://archive.is/Dl71r
2012: Baku, Azerbaijan, https://archive.is/XUDaX
2013: Bali, Indonesia, https://archive.is/wksxQ
2014: Istanbul, Turkey, https://archive.is/XKnUe
2015: João Pessoa, Brazil, https://archive.is/1CiSE
2016: Jalisco, Mexico, https://archive.is/Rkazl
2017: Geneva, Switzerland, https://archive.is/mtw6w
2018: Paris, France, https://archive.is/zEsjK
2019: Berlin, Germany, https://archive.is/KGwzo

3. Important Issues Global IGF Discusses

What Key Issues are discussed at the IGF?
As an example, key issues discussed at the 12th meeting of the IGF in 2017 include:
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– The impact of modern technologies on industry, society, and the economy;
– Multistakeholderism and Multilateralism and the setting of global norms;
– The new digital economy & sustainable development — providing opportunities or deepening divides?
– The role of government in policy making in the digital age;
– The emergence of a global, Internet society;
– Cybersecurity and cyber-threats;
Artificial intelligence (AI);
– Critical Internet resources;
– Blockchains and bitcoins;
Fake news;
– Access, inclusion and diversity;
– The pressing need for security in the Internet of Things;
– Digital divides;

https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/about-igf-faqs

Advocates of strong free speech laws will notice (in particular) the topics of the role of government, and fake news. Makes one wonder if various Heads of State will decide what is real news and what is fake.

4. Who Funds Global IGF?

How is the global Internet Governance Forum funded?
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The Internet Governance Forum (IGF) Secretariat – based in Geneva, is sustained financially through the extra-budgetary Trust Fund Account managed by United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs (UN DESA). The nature of the IGF Trust Fund is such that it is voluntary and multi-donor driven, with varying contributions from Governments and non-governmental organisations from the technical community, the private sector and the civil society. The IGF Trust Fund covers the administrative and operational costs of the IGF Secretariat including personnel, fellowships, and meeting costs (venues, interpretation, logistical costs, etc.); and funds the travel costs of MAG Members from developing countries. More details about the list of donors and funds received are available online. The Trust Fund also provides support to various intersessional activities, inter alia Best Practice Forums, major policy initiatives such as Connecting and Enabling the Next Billion(s), etc.

Each year, the organizational and conference cost of the annual meeting of the Internet Governance Forum is provided for by the Government of the host country, administered through a Host Country Agreement signed between the Government and the UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

https://www.intgovforum.org/multilingual/content/about-igf-faqs

Donors to the Trust Fund (highest to lowest)

  • Government of Finland
  • Government of Germany
  • European Commission
  • Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN)
  • The Internet Society (ISOC)
  • Number Resource Organization (NRO)
  • Government of the Netherlands
  • Government of Switzerland
  • Government of the United States
  • Government of the United Kingdom
  • Government of Japan
  • Nominet UK
  • Tides Foundation
  • Verizon
  • IGFSA
  • Brazilian Internet Steering Committee
  • AT&T
  • China Energy Fund Committee
  • Verisign
  • Afilias Global Registry Services
  • Facebook
  • Government of Portugal – Fundacao Para a Ciencia e a Tecnologia
  • Microsoft Corporation
  • Siemens Aktiengesellschaft – Communications / Nokia Siemens Networks
  • Google
  • Government of Norway
  • Government of Sweden
  • Amazon
  • UNINETT Norid
  • The Swiss Education & Research Network (SWITCH)
  • The Walt Disney Company
  • European Registry for Internet domains
  • CISCO
  • auDA Australia’s Domain Name Administrator
  • International Chamber of Commerce (ICC) – Business Action to Support the Information Society (BASIS)
  • Coordination Center for TLD
  • Danish Internet Forum
  • Politecnico di Torino
  • Community DNS
  • Government of the Republic of Korea
  • European Telecommunication Network Operators’ Association
  • MCADE, LLC
  • NIC-MEXICO
  • Nic.at The Austrian Registry
  • Summit Strategies International
  • NIKKEI DigitalCORE
  • Ribose Inc.

In addition to the funding of various governments, the following names should be familiar to almost everyone: Google, Facebook, Microsoft, Disney, Amazon, AT&T, Verizon, and the Soros-funded Tides Foundation.

5. IGF And UNSG Panel On Digital Cooperation

>> FABRIZIO HOCHSCHILD: Excellencies, ladies and gentlemen, dear friends and colleagues. We’re having this conversation under unusual circumstances at a pivotal moment in history.

In a world already fundamentally transformed by digital technologies, the onslaught of the COVID-19 pandemic and the need for social distancing have propelled the adoption of information and communications technologies and transformed the bedrock of humanity’s means of survival and prosperity: communication. To cooperate, we must communicate, and to communicate nowadays, we must use digital means. This is an important time for Internet governance.

COVID-19 has raised the stakes for global digital cooperation. Over the last few months, my office, in partnership with the international telecommunications unit, organized a series of webinars on digital cooperation in times of COVID-19 and beyond. These discussions considered challenges when urgent cooperation is required, such as with regard to the ongoing deficit in connectivity, with regard to human rights challenges and trust and security issues.

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Health systems today don’t just have to treat the sick. They also have to deal with cyber attacks and the spread of dangerous, life-threatening misinformation.

In follow-up to the Secretary-General’s call for a global cease far, I also called for a digital cease fire. Global cooperation is necessary if we wish to overcome the pandemic without drastically compromising values like privacy and freedom of speech.

A few days ago, the Secretary-General presented his roadmap for digital cooperation which sets forth his vision for how the international community should engage on these and other key digital issues outlined in the report of the High-Level Panel on Digital Cooperation. The roadmap describes a range of actions for all stakeholders from the United Nations system to member states, the private sector, civil society organizations, and the technical community. The United Nations, including the IGF, the Internet Governance Forum, can truly serve as a platform for informed discussion and evidence-based decisions and practices.

The High-level Panel had noted, and I quote, “a great deal of dissatisfaction with existing digital cooperation arrangements, a desire for more tangible outcomes, more active and diverse participation by governments and the private sector, and more inclusive processes and better follow-up,” end of quote.

The IGF should be retooled to become more responsive and relevant to current digital issues. We must ensure that the IGF is a forum that governments value and want to attend while preserving the important space it represents for other stakeholder engagement.

The IGF’s coordinating and strategic role needs to be further strengthened. The roadmap includes a series of suggestions to further enhance the IGF, such as by improving fundraising, inclusion, and outcomes. I hope you will all be engaged in the follow-up of the action areas highlighted in the Secretary-General’s roadmap, and I hope you will all share your views specifically on how the IGF can be made even more responsive to the evolving challenges of digital cooperation.

Thank you for your engagement and support of the IGF and digital cooperation. We welcome and we need your ideas, your proposals, and your continued enthusiasm and support.
Thank you.

Don’t worry. It’s not like this will lead to a global body deciding what can or can’t be talked about or shared on the internet. This will absolutely never be abused.

6. Global Digital Cooperation Frameworks

The Global Internet Governance Forum goes on to propose several different ways that “digital cooperation” could be implemented on a world-wide scale. But don’t worry. It’s all just discussion, and nothing that gets suggested will ever become legally binding.

7. Canadian Internet Governance Forum

Save the date: The virtual Canadian IGF will be Nov. 24 and Nov. 25, 2020.
The Canadian Internet Governance Forum (IGF) is Canada’s leading multi-stakeholder forum on digital and internet policy issues.
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The inaugural event took place last year in Toronto and brought together over 200 representatives from government, civil society, and the private sector to tackle pressing public policy issues facing the internet.
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The Canadian IGF is a national initiative of the global United-Nations-convened Internet Governance Forum, which holds annual meetings at different locations around the world. The Canadian IGF will produce a report detailing the unique, regional priorities facing Canadian stakeholders in attendance. This report will then be fed into the global IGF.

2019.canadian.internet.governance.forum

This isn’t just some abstract UN group far off. There exists a Canadian branch of the Internet Governance Forum, and its agenda is pretty much what one would expect.

Throughout the discussions, several common themes emerged across subject areas. These
included trends towards increased regulation; the necessity for plain language content; and,
the need for education and digital literacy. For stakeholders engaging in Internet governance
domestically and abroad, priorities going forward include the need for:
• A transnational, multistakeholder approach to internet governance.
• Awareness of/education on the issues, and how users can participate in discussions
related to internet governance.
• Solutions developed by any stakeholder group that are thoughtful, evidence-based, and
proportionate.
• Transparency from both governments and businesses in order to promote public trust
and build the capacity of users.

These priorities are elaborated in the conclusion of this report.

That is from page 5 on the report. They explicitly state that they view internet regulation as a global concept.

Key Issues
• Fake news and misinformation.
• Hateful online speech.
• Global and domestic threats.
• Data security

Discussion Overview
The panel’s discussion surrounded three main topics: 1) While foreign actors are a threat, domestic actors are an equal or higher risk when it comes to the dissemination of fake news and the proliferation of hateful speech online. Social media platforms also have to balance discouraging fake news, while ensuring they are not censoring a legitimate group; 2) Political actors are increasingly using social media platforms as a tool to get messages out; and 3) In the aftermath of Cambridge Analytica, academics have seen social media platforms reduce their access to datasets to study the fake news problem.

A recent report on Canadians’ use of social media shows that 94% of internet users here in this country have at least one social media account. The exposure to potential misinformation and disinformation campaigns is enormous.

Both technological and policy-based solutions are needed to confront the fake news problem. Facebook, for instance, has a three-pronged strategy focusing on people, technology and, increasingly, partnerships. Facebook has gone from 10,000 to 30,000 people dedicated to working on this challenge. In Q2 and Q3 of last year, Facebook removed approximately 1.5 billion fake accounts. The development of digital literacy skills is required to help users discern between real and fake news. The need for civility among users was also stressed. Canada must decide on its approach to fake news and newer technology, generally. Do we want to follow the lead of the United States or Europe?

A void has been created in the news world because traditional journalism is fading quickly. Social media platforms have become a new distribution channel for news. Panelists disagreed on whether the problem can be solved through technology or if it is more deeply rooted in human causes for which technology has no response

2019.canadian.internet.governance.forum

From pages 18/19 in the report: it seems that outlets like Facebook have taken it upon themselves to determine what accounts are fake, and what counts as fake news.

The authors of this report, (and of IGF more broadly), keep referring to “international stakeholders”. It seems to imply that other parties should have some say over free speech on the internet, instead of Canadians themselves.

8. Canada Gov’t Bought Off Media (2018)

It’s interesting that the report talks about the decline of traditional media (which is true), but omits the tax-payer funded bailout that the Canadian Government gave. In effect, old-stock media in Canada is now subsidized even more so. Even without the IGF, the media is already pretty corrupt.

9. UNESCO Campaign Against Mis-Information

This was covered a few months ago, but UNESCO has been embarking on a serious campaign against what it calls “misinformation”. UNESCO reminds people to only trust official sources for information on coronavirus.

10. UN Wants Internet Ruled By International Law

Tremendous progress has been made internationally in accepting that international law and the UN Charter apply in cyberspace. He urged the private sector to be involved in countering the number of malevolent tools being deployed in cyberspace, especially in developing more secure software.

Combating Fake News and Dangerous Content in the Digital Age
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The consensus from the session on Fake News was that part of the complexity to tackle disinformation was the challenge to define it. From election interference to stoking up hate or increase religious hatred, there are also other multilayered levels such as spam, and misleading types of content like opinion pieces masking as objective journalism.

Irene Poetrant, Senior Researcher for Citizen Lab of University of Toronto agreed, saying definitions matter and in order to maintain an open and democratic system, it is important for government, private sector, civil society and institutions to work together, and that fake news is not just a problem of the west but a global problem.

“Misinformation is the antithesis of Google’s mission”, said Jake Lucchi, Head of Online Safety and Social Impact. Partnering with journalists, governments, and third parties, they try to find product solutions to identify misinformation and find ways to surface authoritative content. “Young people need to have critical thinking and skills to be able to navigate the internet and check our sources.” Improved algorithms and having policies in place to prohibit hate speech are also key – providers have to ensure misinformation are not allowed on their platforms.

That page is from the November 2018 meeting is Paris. While it sounds benevolent on the surface, who exactly will be the arbitrator of what is “fake news”? Remember, UNESCO (as an example), repeatedly says that only official sources can be trusted. This comes in spite of a wealth of information that CONTRADICTS those narratives. This raises the question of can valid media be shut down if factual reporting is tagged as “misinformation”?

11. Digital Charter Long In The Making

Think that the “Digital Charter” was an idea suddenly concocted? It wasn’t. The UN Digital Cooperation Panel was launched in the Summer of 2018. When the New Zealand shooting happened in March 2019, the stage had already been set.

In a similar vein, the mass shooting in Nova Scotia appears to be a pretext for the Federal Government imposing a mass gun grab.

12. Calls To Expand Digital Cooperation

11 June 2020 – New York
United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres presented today a set of recommended actions for the international community to help ensure all people are connected, respected, and protected in the digital age. The Secretary-General’s Roadmap for Digital Cooperation is the result of a multi-year, multi-stakeholder, global effort to address a range of issues related to the Internet, artificial intelligence, and other digital technologies.

The Roadmap for Digital Cooperation comes at a critical inflection point for digital issues, with the COVID-19 pandemic accelerating digitization and magnifying both opportunities and challenges of digital technology.

digital.cooperation.roadmap.expand

But don’t worry. These resolutions and agreements won’t ever become legally binding, or anything like that. These are just ideas being thrown around.

CV #53: Albion College (Michigan), A Model For The Higher Education Train Wreck?

Albion College is an undergraduate liberal arts college in Albion, Michigan. Is this where higher education is going, and should it just be allowed to collapse?

1. Other Articles On CV “Planned-emic”

For other articles in the coronavirus series, check here. There is an awful lot that you are not being told my the mainstream media, including the lies, lobbying, money changing hands, and one world agenda. Nothing is what it appears to be. Also, check out related topics, such as: borders, education, free speech, the media.

2. No Monopoly On Education Disasters

This should be obvious, but will be mentioned anyway: this is in no way to suggest that Albion College is alone in how they operate. In Canada, the United States, and elsewhere, higher education is beyond parody. Certainly, plenty of schools operate in similar fashions. However, this article focuses on Albion. Let’s get started.

Albion College is a liberal arts college, so it its focus isn’t on providing students with actual job training. Keep that in mind.

3. Tuition Alone Is $50,000 USD/Year

For the 2020-2021 school year, tuition alone is some $50,000 for the year. Adding in the other expenses, and it works about to some $60,000. For a 4 year degree, it would be about $250,000 lost — yes, a quarter million.

Of course, that doesn’t take into account that fall-winter semesters are 8 months, not 12. There’s also being out of the workforce for at least 4 years, and interest accumulated on any loans.

A person could buy a house in many areas for that kind of money. And houses, unlike student loan debts, are dischargeable in bankruptcy. So the students going here are obviously not too bright to begin with.

4. Illegal Aliens Welcome To Study

UNDOCUMENTED & DACA-MENTED STUDENT SUPPORT
Albion College draws its strength from the rich diversity of our students. We are pleased to welcome qualified students from all backgrounds, regardless of citizenship and immigration status, into our living and learning community.
.
We are mindful of the challenges faced by DACA holders and undocumented students during these uncertain times and are committed to continuing to welcome and support these individuals.

FINANCIAL RESOURCES & INFORMATION
On-Campus Resources
Office of Student Financial Aid Services
The Office of Student Financial Services at Albion College is committed to welcoming and supporting undocumented students and we financially support all admitted students regardless of citizenship and immigration status.
.
Undocumented students qualify for all merit based scholarships offered by Albion and will be awarded scholarships based on their academic merit and geographic location. Additional financial aid is available. Please speak with your admission counselor and inform them that you are not eligible to complete the FAFSA. Your admission counselor will then work with Student Financial Services to prepare your comprehensive financial aid award.
.
If you have additional questions, please contact your Admission Counselor or the Office of Student Financial Services.

ADVOCACY ORGANIZATIONS AND CONTACTS
On-Campus Resources
What do I do if I see Immigration Enforcement on campus?
Any situations on campus involving Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) should be referred to Ken Snyder, Director of Campus Safety who can be reached by calling campus safety at 517/629-0911. Mr. Snyder will consult with College counsel as necessary to verify any warrant presented.
.
Where can I find resources locally?
Registrar Andrew Dunham, is available to help students and their allies find resources. He can be reached at 517/629-0216 or .
.
Undocumented Student Support Committee (USSC)
The USSC works to identify and address the needs of undocumented students at Albion College
.

Just so you know, being undocumented, (or being in the country illegally), is actually a form of diversity, and should be welcomed. Also, being here illegally doesn’t disqualify students from obtaining financial aid. Albion gives information on avoiding Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), and support services.

5. Testing All Students Multiple Times

Get ready to be tested at the beginning of the year. This will also happen throughout the year, and at random intervals. Isn’t there some right to privacy for students?

6. Quarantine Before/After Moving In

Pre-Arrival Expectations
The following expectations are required of students and their families prior to coming to Albion College. Remember, together, we can create a safe, engaging and dynamic fall semester!
.
Students should quarantine at home for at least 7 days before their move-in date.
Wear a mask when not at home.
Enjoy time with family at home! (And, do not get together with others outside of your household.)
Avoid restaurants, stores and other public indoor spaces as much as possible.
Students or their helpers who have tested positive for COVID-19 or who are experiencing symptoms should not return to campus on their scheduled move-in date. You should email to make other arrangements to return after you have been cleared by health officials.
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Students are allowed up to two helpers to assist them in moving in. Say your goodbyes and goodlucks before leaving home, and only travel with the people who are absolutely necessary to help you bring your belongings into your residence hall, apartment or fraternity house. Then send a selfie or two (or ten) to document your move-in!

Move-In Day Expectations
The following expectations are required of students and their helpers during the move-in process:
.
Students will be required to receive a COVID-19 test during the move-in process. Testing will be conducted with nasal swabs with a 3-day turnaround, and will be provided with no direct cost to students. More information on the testing protocol here.
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Students and their helpers will be required to wear masks/face coverings at all times during the move-in process, and are asked to do their best to maintain 6 feet of physical distance from other students and helpers, to protect each other from illness.

For those moving in, you are required to self-quarantine both before and after the move in, wear a mask, and stay 6 feet apart. This is Orwellian beyond belief. However, other schools are probably not much different.

7. Mandatory Contact Tracing For All

Students: Complete the Residential Life check-in process including verification of cell phone number and other important student information, and receive a new student ID encoded with your Fall 2020 room assignment. Cell phone numbers are vital to help the College to maintain a safe and healthy environment as students may need to be notified of positive COVID-19 tests or that they have been identified as a ‘close contact’ to someone who has tested positive for COVID-19.
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After completing the check-in process, proceed to the residential building and park where instructed. Staff will direct you to the door nearest the student’s room.
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Once the student has completed move-in, helpers will be expected to leave campus and not return until the end of Fall semester to assist their student in traveling back home.

Contact tracing will also be part of the school’s policies. It also looks like there won’t be any visitors allowed except for a move-out. Seriously, is this “education and accommodation” really worth $60,000 for a single year? Remember, the debt cannot be discharged even in bankruptcy.

8. Permission Needed To Leave Campus

The Washington Free Beacon reported on new policies at Albion College, such as being tracked all the time, and needing permission to leave campus. The article seems to be true, given the information Albion itself has posted. See the archive.

9. Questionable Commitment To Free Speech

Think there is a real commitment to open expression and viewpoint diversity? Well, Albion does have workshops on “overcoming white privilege”. That should tell you all you need to know.

10. Doing Nothing A Better Option

Consider once more, that tuition and expenses will come to about a quarter million dollars, (for 8 month school years). There are summer living expenses, extra living expenses, interest on the student loans, years out fo the workforce, and a brainwashing Marxist education to also factor in. And of course, student loan debts cannot be discharged in bankruptcy.

Your next few years will be a constant invasion of privacy, and having your freedoms whittled away in the name of safety.

In all honesty, staying home for a few years doing absolutely nothing would probably leave you in a better position financially than going to university at Albion. Just something to think about.

To be fair, all of the blame can’t be dumped on the school, considering that it does have to comply with Michigan’s State Orders. Nonetheless, this seems a horrible deal for students.

11. 100 Reasons Not To Do Grad School

The blog 100 Reasons Not To Go To Grad School offers an extremely thorough list of reasons to reconsider university. Although it is aimed at graduate programs, a lot of the content also applies to undergraduate as well. Very much worth a read.

TSCE #30: WHO/UNESCO’s Pedophile And Abortion Education Agenda

The World Health Organization publishes UNESCO’s guidelines on sex-ed for minors. Many parents would consider this inappropriate to be included in the education system.

1. Trafficking, Smuggling, Child Exploitation

Check the link for more information on the TSCE series. Also, more information on Canada’s borders is available here, including the connection between open borders, and human trafficking/smuggling. Finally, more information on infanticide is available.

2. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for WHO publishing UNESCO’s 2018 sex-ed guide.
CLICK HERE, for UNESCO’s publication in 2018.
CLICK HERE, for global citizenship education learning objectives.
CLICK HERE, for global citizenship education FAQ.
CLICK HERE, for Ben Levin, convicted pedophile.
CLICK HERE, for UNESCO and digital sex.
CLICK HERE, for the programme guidebook.

who.unesco.sex.ed.guidelines.book
UNESCO.list.of.ngo.partners

international.planned.parenthood.1.toolkit.in.youth
international.planned.parenthood.2.consent.boundaries
international.planned.parenthood.3.right.to.know
international.planned.parenthood.4.access.to.services.

3. Manitoba Adopts Global Citizen Education

manitoba.education.global.issues
https://www.edu.gov.mb.ca/k12/esd/pdfs/global_issues.pdf

Although not directly related to the pedo agenda, the Province of Manitoba has implemented the “Citizenship and Sustainability” agenda into its high school cirriculum.

4. Pedo Ben Levin Wrote Ontario Cirriculum

Ontario’s sex-ed cirriculum was written by an actual pedophile, Ben Levin, who has served time for child pornography. Current Premier Doug Ford had promised to remove it, but broke that pledge after getting elected.

5. Pedo Highlights From The Report

who.unesco.sex.ed.guidelines.book

UNESCO breaks it down into 4 age ranges of children they want to target:
5 to 8 years old
9 to 12 years old
12 to 15 years old
15 to 18 years old
The information quoted below only covers the 5-8 year old recommendations. That is, aimed at children as young as 5. The older groups get much more explicit.

1.2 Friendship, Love and Romantic Relationships (contd.)
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: There are different kinds of friendships
Learners will be able to:
▶ define a friend (knowledge);
▶ value friendships (attitudinal);
▶ Recognize that gender, disability or someone’s
health does not get in the way of becoming friends
(attitudinal);
▶ develop a diversity of friendships (skill).
Key idea: Friendships are based on trust, sharing,
respect, empathy and solidarity
Learners will be able to:
▶ describe key components of friendships (e.g. trust,
sharing, respect, support, empathy and solidarity)
(knowledge);
▶ propose to build friendships based on key components
of friendships (attitudinal);
▶ demonstrate ways to show trust, respect,
understanding, and to share with a friend (skill).
Key idea: Relationships involve different kinds
of love (e.g. love between friends, love between
parents, love between romantic partners) and love
can be expressed in many different ways

Learners will be able to:
identify different kinds of love and ways that love can
be expressed (knowledge)
;
▶ acknowledge that love can be expressed in different
ways (attitudinal);
▶ express love within a friendship (skill).
Key idea: There are healthy and unhealthy
relationships
Learners will be able to:
▶ list characteristics of healthy and unhealthy
relationships (knowledge);
define good touch and bad touch (knowledge);
▶ perceive that there are healthy and unhealthy
friendships (attitudinal);
▶ develop and maintain healthy friendships (skill).

3.1 The Social Construction of Gender and Gender Norms
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: It is important to understand the
difference between biological sex and gender
Learners will be able to:
define gender and biological sex and describe how they
are different (knowledge);
▶ reflect on how they feel about their biological sex and
gender
(skill).

3.3 Gender-based Violence
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: It is important to know what GBV is and
where to go for help
Learners will be able to:
▶ define GBV and recognize that it can take place in
different locations (e.g. school, home or in public)
(knowledge);
▶ understand that our ideas about gender and gender
stereotypes can affect how we treat other people,
including discrimination
and violence (knowledge);
▶ acknowledge that all forms of GBV are wrong (attitude);
▶ identify and describe how they would approach a
trusted adult to talk to if they or someone they know
are experiencing GBV, including violence in or around
school (skill).

4.2 Consent, Privacy and Bodily Integrity
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: Everyone has the right to decide who
can touch their body, where, and in what way

Learners will be able to:
▶ describe the meaning of ‘body rights’ (knowledge);
▶ identify which parts of the body are private
(knowledge);
▶ recognize that everyone has ‘body rights’ (attitudinal);
▶ demonstrate how to respond if someone is touching
them in a way that makes them feel uncomfortable (e.g.
say ‘no’, ‘go away’, and talk to a trusted adult) (skill);
▶ identify and describe how they would talk to a
parent/guardian or trusted adult if they are feeling
uncomfortable about being touched (skill).

6.1 Sexual and Reproductive Anatomy and Physiology
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: It is important to know the names and
functions of one’s body and it is natural to be
curious about them, including the sexual and
reproductive organs

Learners will be able to:
▶ identify the critical parts of the internal and external
genitals and describe their basic function
(knowledge);
recognize that being curious about one’s body, including
the genitals, is completely normal
(attitudinal);
practise asking and responding to questions about
body parts that they are curious about
(skill).
Key idea: Everyone has a unique body that
deserves respect, including people with disabilities
Learners will be able to:
▶ identify ways that men’s, women’s, boys‘, and girls’
bodies are the same; the ways they are different; and
how they can change over time (knowledge);
▶ explain that all cultures have different ways of seeing
people’s bodies
(knowledge);
▶ acknowledge that everyone’s body deserves respect,
including people with disabilities (attitudinal);
▶ express things that they like about their body (skill)

6.2 Reproduction
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: A pregnancy begins when an egg and
sperm unite and implant in the uterus

Learners will be able to:
describe the process of reproduction – specifically that
a sperm and egg must both join and then implant in the
uterus for a pregnancy to begin (knowledge).
Key idea: Pregnancy generally lasts for 40 weeks
and a woman’s body undergoes many changes
during the span of a pregnancy
Learners will be able to:
describe the changes that a woman’s body undergoes
during the duration of a pregnancy
(knowledge);
▶ express how they feel about the changes that a
woman’s body undergoes during pregnancy (skill).

6.3 Puberty
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: Puberty is a time of physical and
emotional change that happens as children grow
and mature

Learners will be able to:
▶ define puberty (knowledge);
▶ understand that growing up involves physical and
emotional changes (knowledge);
▶ acknowledge that puberty is a normal and healthy part
of adolescence (attitudinal).

7.1 Sex, Sexuality and the Sexual Life Cycle
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: It is natural for humans to enjoy their
bodies and being close to others throughout their
lives
Learners will be able to:
▶ understand that physical enjoyment and excitement are
natural human feelings, and this can involve physical
closeness
to other people (knowledge);
▶ understand that there are many words to describe
physical feelings, and some are related to showing
feelings for and being close to others (knowledge);
recognize that there are appropriate and inappropriate
language and behaviours related to how we express our
feelings for and closeness
to others (attitudinal).

7.2 Sexual Behaviour and Sexual Response (contd.)
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: People can show love for other people
through touching and intimacy
Learners will be able to:
▶ state that people show love and care for other people in
different ways, including kissing, hugging, touching, and
sometimes through sexual behaviours
(knowledge).
Key idea: Children should understand what is and
what is not appropriate touching
Learners will be able to:
▶ define ‘good touch’ and ‘bad touch’ (knowledge);
▶ recognize that there are some ways of touching children
that are bad (attitudinal);
▶ demonstrate what

8.1 Pregnancy and Pregnancy Prevention (contd.)
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: Pregnancy is a natural biological process
and can be planned

Learners will be able to:
▶ recall that pregnancy begins when egg and sperm unite
and implant in the uterus (knowledge);
▶ explain that pregnancy and reproduction are natural
biological process, and that people can plan when to
get pregnant
(knowledge);
▶ explain that all children should be wanted, cared for
and loved (attitude);
▶ recognise that not all couples have children
(knowledge).

8.2 HIV and AIDS Stigma, Treatment, Care and Support (contd.)
Learning objectives (5-8 years)
Key idea: People living with HIV have equal rights
and live productive lives
Learners will be able to:
▶ state that with the right care, treatment and support,
people living with HIV are able to live fully productive
lives and to have their own children if they wish to
(knowledge);
recognize that people living with HIV have the right
to equal love, respect, care and support (and timely
treatment) as everyone (attitudinal).
Key idea: There are effective medical treatments
that can help people living with HIV

Learners will be able to:
▶ state that there are effective medical treatments that,
with care, respect and support, people living with HIV
can now take to manage their condition (knowledge).

Keep in mind, these are the guidelines for children from 5 to 8 years old. The older age brackets get far more explicit and detailed. Many people will find this very inappropriate.

6. Attempting To Deflect Criticism

CSE goes against our culture or religion

▶ The Guidance stresses the need to engage and build support among the custodians of culture in a given community, in order to adapt the content to the local cultural context. Key stakeholders, including religious leaders, can assist programme developers and providers to engage with the key values central to the relevant religions and cultures, as people’s religious beliefs will inform what they do with the knowledge they possess. The Guidance also highlights the need to reflect on and address negative social norms and harmful practices that are not in line with human rights or that increase vulnerabilty and risk, especially for girls and young women or other marginalized populations

Sexuality education should promote positive values and responsibility

▶ The Guidance supports a rights-based approach that emphasizes values such as respect, acceptance, equality, empathy, responsibility and reciprocity as inextricably linked to universal human rights. It is essential to include a focus on values and responsibility within a comprehensive approach to sexuality education. CSE fosters opportunities for learners to assess and clarify their own values and attitudes regarding a range of topics.

In short, “acceptance and tolerance” is promoted more than morality, or parental choice are. Some strange priorities to have.

7. Abortion Agenda In Full View

From: Committee on the Rights of the Child CRC/C/GC/20, General comment No. 20) on the implementation of the rights of the child during adolescence 2016 (from page 119 in report)

59. The Committee urges States to adopt comprehensive gender and sexuality-sensitive sexual and reproductive health policies for adolescents, emphasizing that unequal access by adolescents to such information, commodities and services amounts to discrimination. Lack of access to such services contributes to adolescent girls being the group most at risk of dying or suffering serious or lifelong injuries in pregnancy and childbirth. All adolescents should have access to free, confidential, adolescent-responsive and non- discriminatory sexual and reproductive health services, information and education, available both online and in person, including on family planning, contraception, including emergency contraception, prevention, care and treatment of sexually transmitted infections, counselling, pre-conception care, maternal health services and menstrual hygiene.

60. There should be no barriers to commodities, information and counselling on sexual and reproductive health and rights, such as requirements for third-party consent or authorization. In addition, particular efforts need to be made to overcome barriers of stigma and fear experienced by, for example, adolescent girls, girls with disabilities and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex adolescents, in gaining access to such services. The Committee urges States to decriminalize abortion to ensure that girls have access to safe abortion and post-abortion services, review legislation with a view to guaranteeing the best interests of pregnant adolescents and ensure that their views are always heard and respected in abortion-related decisions.

61. Age-appropriate, comprehensive and inclusive sexual and reproductive health education, based on scientific evidence and human rights standards and developed with adolescents, should be part of the mandatory school curriculum and reach out-of-school adolescents. Attention should be given to gender equality, sexual diversity, sexual and reproductive health rights, responsible parenthood and sexual behaviour and violence prevention, as well as to preventing early pregnancy and sexually transmitted infections. Information should be available in alternative formats to ensure accessibility to all adolescents, especially adolescents with disabilities.

UNESCO, which the World Health Organization promotes, encourages states to develop policies regarding the pregnancies (and possible abortions), of adolescent girls.

Interestingly, the WHO defines an adolescent as anyone between 10 and 19 years of age. In short, this is about calling for abortion and pregnancy rights for children.

It’s worth pointing out that International Planned Parenthood contributed 4 research papers to this 2018 UNESCO report. See “Important Links” above.

8. UNESCO: Sex In The Digital Space


switched-on-conference-flyer-programme-en

Planned Parenthood is a major sponsor of this conference. It takes place in February 2020, just before this “pandemic” was declared. It’s almost as if the whole thing was planned to beef up cyber sex.

9. WHO/UNESCO Pushing Agenda On Children

How is this a good thing? By pushing sex-ed onto younger and younger children, these groups are able to make this seem normal. Children of this age should not be exposed to this type of information.

CV #46: Dominic LeBlanc Proposes Law To Ban “Misinformation” About Virus

1. Other Articles On CV “Planned-emic”

For other articles in the coronavirus series, check here. There is an awful lot that you are not being told my the mainstream media, including the lies, lobbying, money changing hands, and one world agenda. Nothing is what it appears to be. Also, check out related topics, such as the media, and free speech.

2. Recent Proposal To Require Licensing

Keep in mind, if was only back in February that the Federal Government had proposed making it mandatory for media personalities to be licensed. Heritage Minister Steven Guilbeault admits that the panel proposing it was formed in 2018 by the Liberals.

So the Liberals are no stranger to attacking free speech. In fairness though, the groups pushing for media licensing may be different than those pushing to ban research into coronavirus.

3. Quotes From CBC Article

The federal government is considering introducing legislation to make it an offence to knowingly spread misinformation that could harm people, says Privy Council President Dominic LeBlanc.

LeBlanc told CBC News he is interested in British MP Damian Collins’s call for laws to punish those responsible for spreading dangerous misinformation online about the COVID-19 pandemic.

LeBlanc said he has discussed the matter already with other cabinet ministers, including Justice Minister David Lametti. If the government decides to follow through, he said, it could take a while to draft legislation.

“Legislatures and Parliaments are meeting scarcely because of the current context of the pandemic, so it’s not a quick solution, but it’s certainly something that we would be open [to] as a government,” said LeBlanc.

NDP MP Charlie Angus said he would support legislation to fight online misinformation.

Yes, this came out in April, but is worth revisiting. The Canadian Government is seriously open to the idea of cracking down on what it calls “misinformation” harmful to the public. Also disturbing is an NDP MP who is open to joining the Liberals in this. This is after calls in the UK for similar laws.

More recently, said Collins, the misinformation has shifted to conspiracy theories about what triggered the pandemic — claims that it was cooked up in a lab, for example. A conspiracy theory claiming the disease is caused by 5G wireless signals prompted attacks on wireless towers in the U.K.

The British government has set up a rapid response team to correct false information circulating online. Collins has launched a fact-checking site called Infotagion, along with Angus and Liberal MP Nate Erskine-Smith, among others.

No this is not just a Canadian problem. It’s a problem for people (globally) who want to expose and write about what is really happening.

4. LeBlanc & Microsoft President Smith

There’s been an online surge in disinformation and misinformation linked to the COVID-19 pandemic in recent weeks, along with cyber attacks on hospitals, says the head of one of the world’s tech giants.

Speaking at an event with Canadian Privy Council President Dominic LeBlanc this morning, Microsoft president Brad Smith said his company has seen a recent shift in the pattern of online attacks and efforts to spread false rumours and lies about the pandemic.

Microsoft President met with Dominic LeBlanc in May to talk about the wave of misinformation that was all over the internet. Never mind the obvious fact that Microsoft was headed by Bill gates until very recently, who is pushing the vaccine agenda.

5. Social Media Collusion Already Exists

If we are going to have a law to ban “misinformation”, why don’t we start here? Social media companies like Twitter, Google and Facebook already work to promote the vaccine agenda. They already work together to dismiss critics. Wouldn’t that be a textbook case of what should be included in this proposed ban?

6. So What Exactly Is “Misinformation”?

Is it “misinformation” to point out that Chief Public Health Officer Theresa Tam works for the World Health Organization?

Or how about that Deputy Prime Minister Chystia Freeland also is on the Board of Trustees for the World Economic Forum? And to mention Mark Carney, former head of the Bank of Canada, is as well? Is it “misinformation” to point out that the WEF was behind getting CV declared a pandemic, and now pushes the GREAT RESET?

Is it “misinformation” to point out that on August 4, Theresa Tam parroted the World Health Organization’s line about a vaccine not being a silver bullet?

Is it “misinformation” to point out the rampant lobbying by the pharmaceutical industry here, here, here, and here?

Is it “misinformation” to point out the vast research done into vaccine hesitancy? This is research into psychological manipulation to convince people that vaccines are safe. Not research into MAKING safe vaccines, but research into CONVINCING you that they already are. See here and here.

Is it “misinformation” to point out M-132 was launched PRIOR to this pandemic, to finance drugs, and drug research for the entire world?

Is it “misinformation” to point out that the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is a major and regular contributor to Imperial College London, who does the CV modelling?

Is it “misinformation” to point out the vaccine bonds industry we send money to offers nothing of substance in return?

Is it “misinformation” to point out that the Provinces’ own data show the overwhelming majority of people recover on their own, with no vaccine?

Is it “misinformation” to point out that the BC Provincial Health Officer repeatedly admits there is no science behind limiting group sizes, but does it anyway?

Is it “misinformation” to point out that Ontario Associate Chief Medical Officer Of Health, Barbara Yaffe, admitted that 50% of tests give false positives?

Is it “misinformation” to point out that the World Health Organization doesn’t actually say to stay 2 metres apart?

Is it “misinformation” to point out the rampant lying and exaggerating by public officials of the virus death tolls?

Is it “misinformation” to point out that social media companies openly collude with governments in order to push the pro-vaccine agenda?

7. Still Just A Proposal (For Now)

While it seems to still just be an idea for consideration, it’s a chilling one. Such a law would effectively give the government the right to silence anyone who criticizes its agenda, REGARDLESS of how accurate or factual it may be.

On a personal note: could this site be shut down under the guise of “promoting misinformation”? Could all of this work cease to exist?