“Inside The Ontario Science Table” Now Available Online

Inside The Ontario Science Table: The “Independent” Group Pulling Ford’s Strings, is now available both in paperback, and as an ebook. It builds off of the last one, and as the name implies, there is a heavy focus on that one Province. Of course, Twenty Twenty-One is still there as well, and covers a lot of topics related to this so-called “pandemic”.

A lot of work has gone into both of these, so please support independent research. Thank you.

Other coverage on the site continues.

(1) https://www.amazon.ca/B09BCNP48J
(2) https://www.amazon.ca/B095Y515XK

A Talk With Professor Colin Furness Of The University Of Toronto DLSPH

This article is going to be different. Friday, July 9, I had a talk with University of Toronto Professor Colin Furness. Although our views are miles apart on a lot of this, it’s worthwhile to get another perspective.

This meeting came about after finding his name listed as an advisor for a firm called Sapphire Health. This company is currently working on a model to implement AI (artificial intelligence) into health records. However, it seems that this listing was done in error, as he personally knew the founder, and had talked on a social basis.

His recent work covers “the effectiveness of information systems for knowledge work; information and knowledge management; health behaviour change; infection control epidemiology; COVID-19 pandemic management in Canada.”

In any event, it’s nice to get outside the echo chamber once in a while.

January 2019: First Interim Report Of Premier’s Council on Improving Healthcare and Ending Hallway Medicine

The term “hallway medicine” is used to describe a health care system that is so overloaded that there aren’t enough rooms for patients. Ontario’s health care system has long been operating over capcity. Shortly after taking power in 2018, Doug Ford promised to have the issue studied and corrected.

However, in the light of this so-called “pandemic”, that previous issue seems to have been scrubbed from the media, and from political talking heads. Prior to this, apparently there were no serious health care issues.

The Ontario Science Table and various “TV experts” would have you believe that hospitals are overwhelmed because of a virus (that has yet to be isolated). Countless “non essential” health care services have been cancelled in the name of freeing up space to accommodate anticipated death waves.

Read the 1st report for yourself, but it’s quite telling:

Key Findings
1. Patients and families are having difficulty navigating the health care system and are waiting too long for care. This has a negative impact on their own health and on provider and caregiver well-being.
2. The system is facing capacity pressures today, and it does not have the appropriate mix of services, beds, or digital tools to be ready for the projected increase in complex care needs and capacity pressures in the short and long-term.
3. There needs to be more effective coordination at both the system level, and at the point-of-care. This could achieve better value (i.e. improved health outcomes) for taxpayer money spent throughout the system. As currently designed, the health care system does not always work efficiently

Chapter 1: The Patient Experience
Patients and families are having a difficult time navigating the health care system. Ontarians cannot always see their primary care provider when they need to, wait times for some procedures and access to specialists and community care are too long, and emergency department use is increasing. A lack of early intervention and prevention is contributing to more patients becoming ill. All of these challenges are connected to the problem of hallway health care.
.
Chapter 2: Stress on Caregivers and Providers
Health care providers, family members, and friends are feeling the strain of a system that isn’t making caregiving easy. This leads to high levels of stress and places a heavy burden on caregivers to act as advocates for timely and high-quality health care services.
.
Chapter 3: Different Health Care Needs
There are more patients with complex needs and an increase in chronic issues that require careful and coordinated management, like an aging population living longer with high rates of dementia. Fair access to health care across the province continues to be a concern.
.
Chapter 4: Immediate and Long-Term Capacity Pressures
Ontario does not have an adequate or appropriate mix of services and beds throughout its health care system. This leads to capacity pressures on hospitals and long-term care homes. Demographic projections indicate there will be additional strain on existing capacity in the near future.
.
Chapter 5: Responsibility and Accountability in the System
Ontario’s health care system is large. Responsibility for coordinating high-quality health care is spread across many government agencies, organizations, and the Ministry with no clear point of accountability to keep the focus on improving health outcomes for Ontarians. There is a fundamental lack of clarity about which service provider should be providing what services to patients and how to work together effectively. Ontario could be getting better value for the money it currently spends on the health care system.

Looks pretty serious. Keep in mind, this was 2018/2019, and the consensus even then was that Ontario hospitals were overflowing.

Adalsteinn Brown was part of the Premier’s Council on Improving Healthcare and Ending Hallway Medicine. Their 2019 report concluded that Ontario hospitals didn’t always run efficiently, and there weren’t enough reasons.

Fast forward a year or 2. That same Adalsteinn Brown now runs the Ontario Science Table. The group is claiming that coronavirus cases are responsible for Ontario hospitals being overwhelmed.

This previous Committee work seems to have been completely swept under the rug, as it doesn’t fit with the present narrative.

Even as late as January 2020, it was being reported on that Ontario hospitals were already overwhelmed. In face, CBC referenced a specific campaign promise Ford had made back in 2018 on this issue. CBC’s own investigation had concluded the same thing: that Ontario health care was pushed to its very limits.

From the CBC’s own work, it was shown that many hospitals were over 100% capacity, nearly every single day. This is a serious problem.

However, once the “global pandemic” hit, all talk about this seemed to stop. Instead, hospitals were being overwhelmed by waves of sick and dying “Covid” patients. That was the new narrative.

Hospitals across Canada — not just Ontario — responded by cancelling thousands of preventative, screening, and non emergency procedures. The health care system stopped taking care of the people it didn’t have the capacity to anyway. An interesting way to end hallway medicine. Just cancel services and end the backlog.

(1) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nQfqGQd4laY
(2) https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/publications/premiers_council/report.aspx
(3) https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/publications/premiers_council/docs/premiers_council_report.pdf
(4) https://canucklaw.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/Premiers-Council-Report-1st-Interim.pdf
(5) https://covid19-sciencetable.ca/about/
(6) https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/doug-ford-ontario-hallway-medicine-hospital-overcrowding-1.5440470
(7) https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/ontario-hospital-hallway-medicine-healthcare-beyond-capacity-1.5420434

WHO IS THE ONTARIO SCIENCE TABLE?
(8) Ontario Science Table: Ties To University Of Toronto
(9) Ontario Science Table: Extension Of Gov’t, No Independence
(10) UotT/DLSPH Joins WHO; Communism; Anti-White
(11) Ontario Science Table: Kwame McKenzie, Ontario UBI Pilot Project
(12) Robert Steiner Claims To Be Major PHAC Advisor To Liberals
(13) Ontario Science Table: Actually Set Out In May 2019?
(14) Ontario Science Table; Kumar Murty; Perfect Cloud
(15) Ontario Science Table: Influenced By $5M From Como???
(16) OST: Partnered With CADTH, A WHO Group; And pCPA
(17) Centre For Effective Practive/Partners Profit From Lockdowns
(18) Ontario Science Table: Cochrane Canada; McMaster; Gates
(19) Ontario Science Table: SPOR Evidence Alliance; WHO Funding
(20) OST: David Fisman; Race Baiting; Side Job With ETFO
(21) OST: Adalsteinn Brown; DLSPH; MOH; Premiers Council
(22) Institute For Pandemics Started For Ontario Science Table Hacks
(23) Ontario Science Table Release Guide For “Obedience Training”

Pavlov’s Dogs: OST’s Obedience Training Guide For Ontario Residents

Many years ago, Ivan Pavlov discovered that given the right structure of rewards, dogs could be trained simply by ringing a bell. Dogs would to associate the ringing with food, even at times when that wasn’t the end result.

While his experiments are rudimentary today, they were important break throughs at the time. It’s still taught in introductory college psychology classes. Now, from the Ontario Science Table, and their paper of April 2021.

Key Message
The science of getting people to start something new is different from the science of getting them to continue positive behaviours. Amid rising rates of new SARS-CoV-2 variants of concern, Ontario needs a refreshed approach to maintaining and enhancing adherence to public health measures. Promising strategies to increase effective masking and physical distancing include persuasion, enablement, modelling the behaviour, and clear education.

As such, the strategies are explicitly linked to target groups in a position to action them to support two key groups of Ontarians:
.
1. Those who are already adhering to physical distancing and masking in most situations but are unclear on the remaining high-risk scenarios that exist in their lives (focus on maintenance).
2. Those who are inconsistently following these public health measures due to easily addressed capability, opportunity and motivation reasons (focus on enhancement)

This paper from the Ontario Science Table outlines psychological and behavioural modification techniques that can be applied to convince people to obey the ever changing public health measures.

This was mentioned in a previous article, but now, deserves its own standalone piece. This is quite a piece of work.

The Ontario Science Table recommends tax breaks for companies to force customers and employees to wear masks. That had been rumoured to be a part of the subsidy requirements, but the OST openly suggests that sort of thing.

This is a common type of tactic in retail settings. By moving certain products to make them constantly visible, they are more likely to be on the minds of customers. Hence, they are more likely to be bought.

Masks are to be provided at will in order to reinforce the message that mask wearing is necessary. And by extension, masks are used to reinforce the claim that there is a global pandemic, despite there not being any evidence whatsoever for it.

This one puts the “training” in obedience training. OST recommends creating videos and instructional guides on masks, and to claim it’s what they’ve learned from the science.

OST recommends the implementation of “mask refreshers” so that masks are constantly on the minds of Ontarians. This is essential, otherwise they may start questioning whether there really is a pandemic.

This is straight out of advertising. Get people to identify with those sending the messages, and they are much more likely to comply. It’s subtle emotional manipulation.

Interesting way to get people to go along with the psy-op. Just use humour to lighten the situation.

That same idea can apply to people who get the experimental gene-replacement shot. Doughnuts, beer, lottery tickets and other incentives are already being handed out. Then again, maybe taking out such people is for the best.

https://covid19-sciencetable.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Science-Brief_Enhancing-Adherence-to-Public-Health-Measures_20210422_published.pdf

Interpretation
Governments, public health units, and healthcare organizations are delivering strategies to support Ontarians in adhering to public health measures, with an emphasis on physical distancing and masking. This Science Brief recognizes that more than a year into the COVID-19 pandemic, we need to move beyond “more of the same” when it comes to strategies to maintain and enhance how, when, and where Ontarians engage in masking and distancing. Groups in a position to support change can leverage behavioural science to refresh their approaches by using a range of evidence-based behavioural change strategies. These strategies can help to move beyond asking Ontarians to “do more” (potentially contributing to pandemic fatigue) and instead focus on creating the conditions needed to ensure ongoing adherence in our current state.

Methods Used for This Science Brief
The advice on this brief has been developed using the COM-B model. COM-B is a theoretical framework employed by Behavioural Scientists to help identify key behavioural barriers to desired action. The model identifies three essential conditions: Capability, Opportunity, Motivation that affect Behaviour and decision making. Capability barriers include lack of knowledge and comprehension about a behaviour and its consequences, and lack of skill necessary to carry out a behaviour. Opportunity barriers include time and resource constraints that make a desired behaviour more difficult or costly to carry out. Motivation barriers include emotional reactions and inaccurate beliefs that create obstacles for carrying out a behaviour.

It’s hard to believe that the OST would release such a report, detailing how to use Ontario as modern day dogs of Ivan Pavlov. But here we are. The April 2021 white paper speaks for itself, and commentary isn’t really necessary.

(1) https://covid19-sciencetable.ca
(2) https://covid19-sciencetable.ca/wp-content/uploads/2021/04/Science-Brief_Enhancing-Adherence-to-Public-Health-Measures_20210422_published.pdf
(3) OST Science Brief Enhancing Adherence to Public Health Measures
(4) https://www.simplypsychology.org/pavlov.html

WHO IS THE ONTARIO SCIENCE TABLE?
(5) Ontario Science Table: Ties To University Of Toronto
(6) Ontario Science Table: Extension Of Gov’t, No Independence
(7) UotT/DLSPH Joins WHO; Communism; Anti-White
(8) Ontario Science Table: Kwame McKenzie, Ontario UBI Pilot Project
(9) Robert Steiner Claims To Be Major PHAC Advisor To Liberals
(10) Ontario Science Table: Actually Set Out In May 2019?
(11) Ontario Science Table; Kumar Murty; Perfect Cloud
(12) Ontario Science Table: Influenced By $5M From Como???
(13) OST: Partnered With CADTH, A WHO Group; And pCPA
(14) Centre For Effective Practive/Partners Profit From Lockdowns
(15) Ontario Science Table: Cochrane Canada; McMaster; Gates
(16) Ontario Science Table: SPOR Evidence Alliance; WHO Funding
(17) OST: David Fisman; Race Baiting; Side Job With ETFO
(18) OST: Adalsteinn Brown; DLSPH; MOH; Premiers Council
(19) Institute For Pandemics Started For Ontario Science Table Hacks

(Charity) University Of Toronto “Institute For Pandemics” Funded By Millers, Merck, Run By Ontario Science Table

Remember those conspiracy nuts saying this was never going to end? The University of Toronto Institute for Pandemics was launched in 2020. It hosts many of the same players from the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, and the Ontario Science Table, such as Adalsteinn Brown, David Fisman and Colin Furness.

Fun fact: University of Toronto has several registered charities tied to its name. Much more on that later.

COVID-19, SARS and other urgent health threats began in animals. It’s time to drop misleading distinctions between human and animal health. Our underpinning “one health” approach considers human, animal and environmental health together.

Read between the lines on this. Not only is this meant to be about human health, but “fighting climate change” could easily be worked into the narrative.

The cause of pandemics is complex; beyond any single government or world body to address. But the opportunities are equally strong, if we can couple technological advances with an intimate knowledge of health systems, economics, the intersectional social determinants of health — and the credibility to influence change amid a historic crisis of trust in governments and the media. Universities must play a central role if we are to mitigate the human suffering and economic devastation caused by pandemics.

This group also promotes the globalist narrative that no country can do this on their own. There is also the implicit declaration that they will try to influence how the media perceives Government. This comes across as pushing propaganda.

The same self-declared “Ontario Science Table” experts who advocate for stripping the rights of Ontarians away will now be doing it directly from the U of T. As shown earlier, there is no real independence, either from Government, or the World Health Organization. It’s quite the rabbit hole.

This “institute” was started up thanks to a $1 million donation from the Vohra-Miller Foundation. About the couple that heads it:

Sabina Vohra-Miller graduated from the University of Toronto, with both a Bachelors and Masters in the pharmaceutical studies. She then spent several years in that field before starting up the Vohra-Miller Foundation with her husband. She co-founded the South Asian Health Network, which pushes vaccines and anti-racism, and founded Unambiguous Science, a website that pushes vaccines. She’s now on the Advisory Table of the Institute for Pandemics.

It’s a bit disturbing that Sabina either misrepresents (or simply is unaware) that these “vaccines” are not approved. They were given interim authorization for emergency use. But her website does little except shill and promote them.

Craig Miller spent years with Kijiji, which is an eBay company. He then moved on to Shopify, leaving in 2020. A few side notes: (a) eBay was founded by Pierre Omidyar, who was been involved in social change, and a “more informed media”; and (b) Shopify was contracted to make a contact tracing app with the Federal Government.

Craig also publicly pushes the climate change narrative. It will be interesting to see if (or how) the Institute for Pandemics will incorporate that into their agenda.

Both of them seem to have ties to organizations that will benefit from prolonging this “pandemic”.

Merck Canada’s $3-million investment will help the centre’s diverse mix of public health researchers to better understand the decision-making of individuals and communities around whether and when to receive immunizations. With expertise in vaccine science, social and behavioural health, equity and health systems, the centre’s faculty members will produce scientific research to aid the Ontario government, policy-makers and public health advocates around the world in increasing public knowledge of and access to immunizations.

Also consider that Merck Canada (the drug company) donated $3 million to the Institute for Pandemics. From their perspective, it makes sense. More pandemics mean a larger market for more drugs. Of course, with tax rebates from the Canada Revenue Agency, this $3 million gift will cost considerably less. This school has quite a few pharma donors.

It was covered previously how several current Medical Officers of Health are either Professors at U of T, or have other ties to the school. This sets up an obvious conflict of interest.

  • Barbara Yaffe – Ontario Deputy Medical Officer
  • Eileen De Villa – Toronto Chief Medical Officer
  • Vinita Dubey – Toronto Associate Medical Officer of Health
  • Lisa Berger – Toronto Associate Medical Officer of Health
  • Christine Navarro – Toronto Associate Medical Officer of Health
  • Avis Lynn Noseworthy – Medical Officer of Health for the Haliburton, Kawartha, Pine Ridge
  • Vera Etches – Ottawa Deputy Medical Officer of Health
  • Brent Moloughney – Ottawa Associate Medical Officer
  • Lawrence C. Loh – Peel Medical Officer of Health
  • Hamidah Meghani – Halton Region Medical Health Officer
  • Nicola Mercer – Wellington-Dufferin-Guelph Medical Officer (U of T Medical School)
  • Mustafa Hirji – Niagara Acting Medical Officer of Health (U of T graduate)
  • Elizabeth Richardson – Hamilton Medical Officer of Health (U of T graduate)

Adalsteinn Brown is the head of the Ontario Science Table, and the Institute for Pandemics. He also runs the Dalla Lana School for Public Health. This effectively means he is the boss of other Professors in that Department. How will the power dynamics work here, as these MOH are supposed to be independent?

Moreover, there are other U of T Professors on the Science Table and the Institute for Pandemics. Will these create conflicts with the MOH, and their dual roles? Why isn’t all of this publicly discussed?

  • Students’ Alzheimer’s Alliance at the University of Toronto (SAAUT)
  • Scholarship Bursary & Education Committee Medical Alumni Association of University of Toronto
  • Student Christian Movement in the University of Toronto
  • The Encumeical Chaplaincy at the University of Toronto
  • The Governing Council of the University of Toronto
  • Trust Under Will of Reuben W Leonard for University of Toronto
  • University of Toronto International Health Program (UTIHP)
  • University of Toronto Community Radio Inc.
  • University of Toronto Schools

Interesting bit of information: there isn’t just 1 charity tied to U of T. There are 9 of them. However, only a few of them are of concern for this article. The Governing Council of the University is by far the biggest one. In their recent tax filings, this NGO claimed to be financing work and research globally. These include:

-UNITED STATES
-(Other countries in Europe)
-(Other countries in Asia and Oceania)
-UNITED KINGDOM
-FRANCE
-(Other countries in Africa)
-SPAIN
-UGANDA
-KENYA
-THAILAND
-GERMANY
-ZAMBIA
-ITALY
-INDIA
-REPUBLIC OF NORTH MACEDONIA
-BANGLADESH
-KOREA, REPUBLIC OF
-ARGENTINA
-ISRAEL
-JAMAICA
-MEXICO
-BRAZIL
-JAPAN
-UKRAINE
-COLOMBIA
-GUYANA
-CAMBODIA
-GHANA
-EGYPT
-MADAGASCAR

So much for being a Canadian school. Now, how much money are they actually taking in and spending each year?

April 2016 Financial Details
Receipted donations $98,554,359.00 (3.44%)
Non-receipted donations $6,357,259.00 (0.22%)
Gifts from other registered charities $37,404,382.00 (1.31%)
Government funding $992,767,454.00 (34.65%)
All other revenue $1,730,060,546.00 (60.38%)
Total revenue: $2,865,144,000.00

Charitable programs $2,786,557,000.00 (96.35%)
Management and administration $75,834,000.00 (2.62%)
Fundraising $29,755,000.00 (1.03%)
Political activities $0.00 (0.00%)
Gifts to other registered charities and qualified donees $0.00 (0.00%)
Other $0.00 (0.00%)
Total expenses: $2,892,146,000.00

Professional and consulting fees: $50,151,000.00
Compensated full-time positions:
$350,000 and over: 10

April 2017 Financial Details
Receipted donations $76,270,736.00 (2.21%)
Non-receipted donations $21,064,207.00 (0.61%)
Gifts from other registered charities $39,602,057.00 (1.15%)
Government funding $1,026,938,285.00 (29.72%)
All other revenue $2,291,696,715.00 (66.32%)
Total revenue: $3,455,572,000.00

Charitable programs $2,232,398,000.00 (95.10%)
Management and administration $82,954,000.00 (3.53%)
Fundraising $32,057,000.00 (1.37%)
Political activities $0.00 (0.00%)
Gifts to other registered charities and qualified donees $0.00 (0.00%)
Other $0.00 (0.00%)
Total expenses: $2,347,409,000.00

Professional and consulting fees: $21,059,000.00
Compensated full-time positions:
$350,000 and over: 10

April 2018 Financial Details
Receipted donations $87,273,828.00 (2.51%)
Non-receipted donations $10,522,417.00 (0.30%)
Gifts from other registered charities $69,132,755.00 (1.99%)
Government funding $1,015,747,096.00 (29.20%)
All other revenue $2,295,824,904.00 (66.00%)
Total revenue: $3,478,501,000.00

Charitable programs $2,860,114,000.00 (95.57%)
Management and administration $99,245,000.00 (3.32%)
Fundraising $33,278,000.00 (1.11%)
Political activities $0.00 (0.00%)
Gifts to other registered charities and qualified donees $0.00 (0.00%)
Other $0.00 (0.00%)
Total expenses: $2,992,637,000.00

Professional and consulting fees: $36,903,000.00
Compensated full-time positions:
$350,000 and over: 10

April 2019 Financial Details
Receipted donations $92,734,000.00 (2.53%)
Non-receipted donations $11,603,000.00 (0.32%)
Gifts from other registered charities $37,350,000.00 (1.02%)
Government funding $1,076,131,000.00 (29.34%)
All other revenue $2,449,795,000.00 (66.80%)
Total revenue: $3,667,613,000.00

Charitable programs $3,014,525,000.00 (95.39%)
Management and administration $110,505,000.00 (3.50%)
Fundraising $35,294,000.00 (1.12%)
Political activities $0.00 (0.00%)
Gifts to other registered charities and qualified donees $0.00 (0.00%)
Other $0.00 (0.00%)
Total expenses: $3,160,324,000.00

Professional and consulting fees: $41,934,000.00
Compensated full-time positions:
$350,000 and over: 10

April 2020 Financial Details
Receipted donations $63,712,000.00 (1.80%)
Non-receipted donations $11,664,000.00 (0.33%)
Gifts from other registered charities $44,316,000.00 (1.25%)
Government funding $1,044,854,000.00 (29.51%)
All other revenue $2,375,684,000.00 (67.11%)
Total revenue: $3,540,230,000.00

Charitable programs $3,414,276,000.00 (95.92%)
Management and administration $110,186,000.00 (3.10%)
Fundraising $35,025,000.00 (0.98%)
Gifts to other registered charities and qualified donees $0.00 (0.00%)
Other $0.00 (0.00%)
Total expenses: $3,559,487,000.00

Professional and consulting fees: $47,072,000.00
Compensated full-time positions:
$350,000 and over: 10

The Governing Council of the University takes in some $3 billion annually. They also pay their Executives very, very well. But it’s easier to do when the donations received are subsidized by the public.

It’s worth pointing out that this “charity” operates plenty of programs abroad. This is likely since many of their donors have interests abroad. A more detailed look at their financials would be appreciated, but here are some of the more generous ones listed by the school.

Is all of this going towards education and research? Or is it to be used to justify draconian measures UNDER THE PRETENSE of education and research?

(1) https://www.dlsph.utoronto.ca/pandemics/
(2) https://www.utoronto.ca/news/u-t-s-dalla-lana-school-public-health-launches-institute-pandemics
(3) https://www.dlsph.utoronto.ca/pandemics/#about
(4) https://www.utoronto.ca/news/u-t-and-merck-canada-partner-advance-and-share-vaccine-knowledge-and-research
(5) https://www.vohramillerfoundation.ca/
(6) https://www.linkedin.com/in/sabinavohramiller/
(7) https://archive.is/0wO5k
(8) https://twitter.com/sabivm
(9) https://www.linkedin.com/in/craigmillertoronto/
(10) https://archive.is/wip/IV3Ha
(11) https://twitter.com/craigmillr
(12) https://www.unambiguous-science.com/
(13) https://www.unambiguous-science.com/jj-approved-by-health-canada/
(14) https://nationalpost.com/pmn/health-pmn/canadas-shopify-blackberry-develop-covid-19-contact-tracing-app-with-local-governments
(15) https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/charities-giving/giving-charity-information-donors/claiming-charitable-tax-credits/charitable-donation-tax-credit-rates.html
(16) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/srch/pub/bscSrch
(17) University Of Toronto Governing Council
(18) https://canucklaw.ca/uoft-dlsph-centre-for-vaccine-preventable-diseases-was-prelude-to-ontario-science-table/

Meet Adalsteinn Brown: Swamp King; OST; Dean Of DLSPH; Ministry Of Health; Ford Operative; Premier’s Council

Adalsteinn (Steini) Brown
Adalsteinn (Steini) Brown is a recognized leader in the development of quality health care systems. Dr. Brown is currently Dean of the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto. Prior to becoming Dean, he was the university’s Director of the Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation and the Dalla Lana Chair of Public Health Policy. He is also a member of the Premier’s Council on Improving Healthcare and Ending Hallway Medicine. His past roles include senior leadership positions in policy and strategy within the Ontario government, founding positions in start-up companies, and extensive work on performance assessment. He received his doctorate from the University of Oxford where he was a Rhodes Scholar.

From his Ministry of Health profile. He’s also Dean of the University of Toronto, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, the Ontario Science Table, and the Premier’s Council on Improving Healthcare and Ending Hallway Medicine.

A high ranking bureaucrat of Doug Ford’s administration is in charge of DLSPH, and the Ontario Science Table. Let’s not pretend that there is any separation or independence whatsoever.

Now, one of those looks particularly interesting: the Premier’s Council on Improving Healthcare and Ending Hallway Medicine. It turns out that it was formed in October 2018, not long after Doug Ford took power. Now, what were some of their findings?

Key Findings

1. Patients and families are having difficulty navigating the health care system and are waiting too long for care. This has a negative impact on their own health and on provider and caregiver well-being.

2. The system is facing capacity pressures today, and it does not have the appropriate mix of services, beds, or digital tools to be ready for the projected increase in complex care needs and capacity pressures in the short and long-term.

3. There needs to be more effective coordination at both the system level, and at the point-of-care. This could achieve better value (i.e. improved health outcomes) for taxpayer money spent throughout the system. As currently designed, the health care system does not always work efficiently

Even back in 2018, 2019, the Premier’s Council openly admitted that the Ontario Health Care system was overburdened, and was unable to meet current needs, let alone projected increases. Adalsteinn Brown is on that Council. When he headed up Ontario Science Table the following year, did he simply forget his own report?

The Interim Report is quite interesting. Have a read.

Brown is also the head of DLSPH, which several current Medical Officers of Health are also Professors. In effect, Brown would effectively be their boss, and hold power over them.

Does this not come across as a major conflict of interest? Brown the “independent scientist” is in charge of various Medical Officers in Ontario (with respect to the University of Toronto), and they are enforcing Government dictates based on his predictions.

And all of these measures to “prevent hospitals from being overwhelmed” is based on false pretenses, since Brown’s recent work shows he ALREADY KNEW there was a capacity problem in Ontario hospitals.

Has no one in our vibrant Canadian media ever thought this was worth reporting on?

(1) https://covid19-sciencetable.ca/about/
(2) https://www.ontariohealth.ca/our-team/board-directors
(3) https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/publications/premiers_council/default.aspx
(4) https://ihpme.utoronto.ca/faculty/adalsteinn-steini-brown/
(5) https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/publications/premiers_council/docs/premiers_council_report.pdf
(6) Premiers Council Report 1st Interim
(7) https://www.health.gov.on.ca/en/public/publications/premiers_council/report.aspx

(A.1) Ontario Science Table: Ties To University Of Toronto
(A.2) Ontario Science Table: Extension Of Gov’t, No Independence
(A.3) UotT/DLSPH Joins WHO; Communism; Anti-White
(A.4) Ontario Science Table: Kwame McKenzie, Ontario UBI Pilot Project
(A.5) Ontario Science Table: Actually Set Out In May 2019?
(A.6) Ontario Science Table; Kumar Murty; Perfect Cloud
(A.7) Ontario Science Table: Influenced By $5M From Como???
(A.8) OST: Partnered With CADTH, A WHO Group; And pCPA
(A.9) Centre For Effective Practive/Partners Profit From Lockdowns
(A.10) Ontario Science Table: Cochrane Canada; McMaster; Gates
(A.11) Ontario Science Table: SPOR Evidence Alliance; WHO Funding
(A.12) OST: David Fisman; Race Baiting; Side Job With ETFO

(B.1) Michael Warner, Ask The Doctor Side Business
(B.2) Abdu Sharkawy: Paid Professional Speaker On The Circuit
(B.3) Ryan Imgrund: Fear-Porn Driving Donations For Lakeside
(B.4) Issac Bogoch: Another UofT “Expert” Pushing Vaxx Agenda
(B.5) Kashif Pirzada: Critical Drugs Coalition; EasyFit; Masks4Canada
(B.6) Colin Furness; Sapphire Health; Doomsday Predictions
(B.7) Health Critic Rempel Has No Interest In Health Of Canadians