Holomodor 2.0 Coming, Or All Just A Coincidence?

Thanks to the people who have been compiling this data. A recent version is available from the Gateway Pundit. Seems odd that so many “independent” events have happened lately, threatening the food supply of the West. Could there be more to it?

Note: the leg work wasn’t done here.

Holodomor is of course a reference to the starvation of Ukrainians in 1932/1933. This is widely believed to have been orchestrated by Stalin, in an effort to put down an independence movement.

Of course, by phasing out meats, and subsiding the mass production of insects, it seems like our rulers have other plans.

  1. 1/11/21 A fire that destroyed 75,000-square-foot processing plant in Fayetteville
  2. 4/30/21 A fire ignited inside the Smithfield Foods pork processing plant in Monmouth, IL
  3. 7/25/21 Three-alarm fire at Kellogg plant in Memphis, 170 emergency personnel responded to the call
  4. 7/30/21 Firefighters on Friday battled a large fire at Tyson’s River Valley Ingredients plant in Hanceville, Alabama
  5. 8/23/21 Fire crews were called to the Patak Meat Production company on Ewing Road in Austell
  6. 9/13/21 A fire at the JBS beef plant in Grand Island, Neb., on Sunday night forced a halt to slaughter and fabrication lines
  7. 10/13/21 A five-alarm fire ripped through the Darigold butter production plant in Caldwell, ID
  8. 11/15/21 A woman is in custody following a fire at the Garrard County Food Pantry
  9. 11/29/21 A fire broke out around 5:30 p.m. at the Maid-Rite Steak Company meat processing plant
  10. 12/13/21 West Side food processing plant in San Antonio left with smoke damage after a fire
  11. 1/7/22 Damage to a poultry processing plant on Hamilton’s Mountain following an overnight fire
  12. 1/13/22 Firefighters worked for 12 hours to put a fire out at the Cargill-Nutrena plant in Lecompte, LA
  13. 1/31/22 a fertilizer plant with 600 tons of ammonium nitrate inside caught on fire on Cherry Street in Winston-Salem
  14. 2/3/22 A massive fire swept through Wisconsin River Meats in Mauston
  15. 2/3/22 At least 130 cows were killed in a fire at Percy Farm in Stowe
  16. 2/15/22 Bonanza Meat Company goes up in flames in El Paso, Texas
  17. 2/15/22 Nearly a week after the fire destroyed most of the Shearer’s Foods plant in Hermiston
  18. 2/16/22 A fire had broken at US largest soybean processing and biodiesel plant in Claypool, Indiana
  19. 2/18/22 An early morning fire tore through the milk parlor at Bess View Farm
  20. 2/19/22 Three people were injured, and one was hospitalized, after an ammonia leak at Lincoln Premium Poultry in Fremont
  21. 2/22/22 The Shearer’s Foods plant in Hermiston caught fire after a propane boiler exploded
  22. 2/28/22 A smoldering pile of sulfur quickly became a raging chemical fire at Nutrien Ag Solutions
  23. 2/28/22 A man was hurt after a fire broke out at the Shadow Brook Farm and Dutch Girl Creamery
  24. 3/4/22 294,800 chickens destroyed at farm in Stoddard, Missouri
  25. 3/4/22 644,000 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Cecil, Maryland
  26. 3/8/22 243,900 chickens destroyed at egg farm in New Castle, Delaware
  27. 3/10/22 663,400 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Cecil, MD
  28. 3/10/22 915,900 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Taylor, IA
  29. 3/14/22 The blaze at 244 Meadow Drive was discovered shortly after 5 p.m. by farm owner Wayne Hoover
  30. 3/14/22 2,750,700 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Jefferson, Wisconsin
  31. 3/16/22 A fire at a Walmart warehouse distribution center in Plainfield, Indiana has cast a large plume of smoke visible throughout Indianapolis.
  32. 3/16/22 Nestle Food Plant extensively damaged in fire and new production destroyed Jonesboro, Arkansas
  33. 3/17/22 5,347,500 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Buena Vista, Iowa
  34. 3/17/22 147,600 chickens destroyed at farm in Kent, Delaware
  35. 3/18/22 315,400 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Cecil, Maryland
  36. 3/22/22 172,000 Turkeys destroyed on farms in South Dakota
  37. 3/22/22 570,000 chickens destroyed at farm in Butler, Nebraska
  38. 3/24/22 Fire fighters from numerous towns are battling a major fire at the McCrum potato processing facility in Belfast, Maine.
  39. 3/24/22 418,500 chickens destroyed at farm in Butler, Nebraska
  40. 3/25/22 250,300 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Franklin, Iowa
  41. 3/26/22 311,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota
  42. 3/27/22 126,300 Turkeys destroyed in South Dakota
  43. 3/28/22 1,460,000 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Guthrie, Iowa
  44. 3/29/22 A massive fire burned 40,000 pounds of food meant to feed people in a food desert near Maricopa
  45. 3/31/22 A structure fire caused significant damage to a large portion of key fresh onion packing facilities in south Texas
  46. 3/31/22 76,400 Turkeys destroyed in Osceola, Iowa
  47. 3/31/22 5,011,700 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Osceola, Iowa
  48. 4/6/22 281,600 chickens destroyed at farm in Wayne, North Carolina
  49. 4/9/22 76,400 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota
  50. 4/9/22 208,900 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota
  51. 4/12/22 89,700 chickens destroyed at farm in Wayne, North Carolina
  52. 4/12/22 1,746,900 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Dixon, Nebraska
  53. 4/12/22 259,000 chickens destroyed at farm in Minnesota
  54. 4/13/22 Fire destroys East Conway Beef & Pork Meat Market in Conway, New Hampshire
  55. 4/13/22 Plane crashes into Gem State Processing, Idaho potato and food processing plant
  56. 4/13/22 77,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota
  57. 4/14/22 Taylor Farms Food Processing plant burns down Salinas, California.
  58. 4/14/22 99,600 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota
  59. 4/15/22 1,380,500 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Lancaster, Minnesota
  60. 4/19/22 Azure Standard nation’s premier independent distributor of organic and healthy food, was destroyed by fire in Dufur, Oregon
  61. 4/19/22 339,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota
  62. 4/19/22 58,000 chickens destroyed at farm in Montrose, Color
  63. 4/20/22 2,000,000 chickens destroyed at egg farm in Minnesota
  64. 4/21/22 A small plane crashed in the lot of a General Mills plant in Covington, Georgia
  65. 4/22/22 197,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota
  66. 4/23/22 200,000 Turkeys destroyed in Minnesota
  67. 4/25/22 1,501,200 chickens destroyed at egg farm Cache, Utah
  68. 4/26/22 307,400 chickens destroyed at farm Lancaster Pennsylvania
  69. 4/27/22 2,118,000 chickens destroyed at farm Knox, Nebraska
  70. 4/28/22 Egg-laying facility in Iowa kills 5.3 million chickens, fires 200-plus workers
  71. 4/28/22 Allen Harim Foods processing plant killed nearly 2M chickens in Delaware
  72. 4/2822 110,700 Turkeys destroyed Barron Wisconsin
  73. 4/29/22 5 million honeybees are dead after a flight carrying the pollinator insects from California to Alaska got diverted to Georgia (New)
  74. 4/29/22 1,366,200 chickens destroyed at farm Weld Colorado
  75. 4/30/22 13,800 chickens destroyed at farm Sequoia Oklahoma
  76. 5/3/22 58,000 Turkeys destroyed Barron Wisconsin
  77. 5/3/22 118,900 Turkeys destroyed Beadle S Dakota
  78. 5/3/22 114,000 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania
  79. 5/3/22 118,900 Turkeys destroyed Lyon Minnesota
  80. 5/7/22 20,100 Turkeys destroyed Barron Wisconsin
  81. 5/10/22 72,300 chickens destroyed at farm Lancaster Pennsylvania
  82. 5/10/22 61,000 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania
  83. 5/10/22 35,100 Turkeys destroyed Muskegon, Michigan
  84. 5/13/22 10,500 Turkeys destroyed Barron Wisconsin
  85. 5/14/22 83,400 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania
  86. 5/17/22 79,00 chickens destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania
  87. 5/18/22 7,200 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania
  88. 5/19/22 Train carrying limestone derailed Jensen Beach FL
  89. 5/21/22 57,000 Turkeys destroyed on farm in Dakota Minnesota
  90. 5/23/22 4,000 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania
  91. 5/29/22 A Saturday night fire destroyed a poultry building at Forsman Farms in Howard Lake, Minnesota
  92. 5/31/22 3,000,000 chickens destroyed by fire at Forsman facility in Stockholm Township, Minnesota
  93. 6/2/22 30,000 ducks destroyed at Duck farm Berks Pennsylvania
  94. 6/7/22 A fire occurred Tuesday evening at the JBS meat packing plant in Green Bay, Wisconsin
  95. 6/8/22 Firefighters from Tangipahoa Fire District 1 respond to a fire at the Purina Feed Mill in Arcola, Louisiana
  96. 6/9/22 Irrigation water was canceled in California (the #1 producer of food in the US) and storage water flushed directly out to the delta.
  97. 6/12/22 Largest Pork Company in the US Shuts Down California Plant Due to High Costs
  98. 6/13/22 Fire Breaks Out at a Food Processing Plant West of Waupaca County in Wisconsin
  99. 6/14/22 Over 10,000 head of cattle have reportedly died in the recent Kansas heat wave (New)

Thanks as well for Lioness of Judah for covering this too. An interesting comment from that post reads:

“Regarding the destruction of processing plants, it would be more impactful if we could see insurance data about how many have been destroyed compared previous years. Just like an sudden increase in 2021 all-cause mortality is very disturbing and indisputable, we need to see a percentage of destroyed plants as compared to a typical year. That data has to be tracked by some insurance companies, right?”

Yes, it would definitely be interesting to see the overall insurance data, as many people have done such things over the years for financial gain.

That being said, this appears on the surface to be a bit too common lately.

Sports Groups That Took CEWS Money To Enforce Masks, Vaxx Pass

Ever wonder why so many sports groups, including youth sports, were to willing to enforce masks and vaccine orders? Maybe, just maybe, it’s because of the CEWS handouts they’ve been getting. CEWS is of course the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy. Of course, it’s not practical to add each agency, so searching the registry for individual names is probably the best.

Even at the NHL level, it seems that subsidies were too tempting rather than just treat people normally.

Wild idea, but with so many playing along, perhaps society isn’t worth saving.

(1) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/habs/cews/srch/pub/bscSrch

OTHER SHILLS FOR MASKS AND VACCINE PASSPORTS
Hotel, Restaurant Groups Getting Wage/Rental Subsidies
Liberals, Conservatives, NDP All Getting Bailout Money
Lawyers, Bar Associations Receiving CEWS Money
Conflicting Out? Lawyers Getting More Than Just CEWS
Churches Are Charities, Getting CEWS, Subsidies & Promoting Vaccines
Trucking Alliance Grants Raising many Eyebrows
Chambers Of Commerce Subsidized By Canadians, Want Open Borders
Banks, Credit Unions, Media Outlets All Getting CEWS
Publishing Industry Subsidized By Taxpayer Money
Gyms And Fitness Centers Getting Subsidies To Push Vaxx Pass
Chapters-Indigo Getting Millions In Subsidies To Discriminate
Jordan Peterson Shills For Vaxx, Suspension Of Civil Rights
Toronto Region Board Of Trade Pushing Vaxx Passports

Source Countries For “Temporary” Workers: 2004-2013

Below is some significant data on temporary foreign workers (TFW) from 1994 to 2013. (See archive). In fairness, the totals differ somewhat from the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament. Perhaps, the methods of calculation weren’t the same.

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

Despite what many think, LEGAL immigration into Canada is actually a much larger threat than illegal aliens, given the true scale of the replacement that is happening. What was founded as a European (British) colony is becoming unrecognizable due to forced demographic changes. There are also social, economic, environmental and voting changes to consider. See this Canadian series, and the UN programs for more detail. Politicians, the media, and so-called “experts” have no interest in coming clean on this.

CLICK HERE, for UN Genocide Prevention/Punishment Convention.
CLICK HERE, for Barcelona Declaration & Kalergi Plan.
CLICK HERE, for UN Kalergi Plan (population replacement).
CLICK HERE, for UN replacement efforts since 1974.
CLICK HERE, for tracing steps of UN replacement agenda.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

There’s also the issue that “temporary” workers and students often don’t leave when their visas expire. Canada offers many pathways to extend their stays, and there is little in the way of enforcement.

Aside from all the official totals, there are 3 “temporary” programs that are worth mentioning. These lead to hundreds of thousands of foreigners entering Canada each year, and most with some option to extend. There are also pathways to permanent residence. These are:

  • Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP)
  • International Mobility Programme (IMP)
  • International Students

Let’s look at a decade worth of data, and see where the bulk of these people are coming from. Of course, this should be pretty obvious. This is on page 17.

Starting with the TFWP: it should be apparent from the data provided that the Philippines is consistently at the top of the TFWP.

2. Temporary Foreign Worker Program Source Countries: 2004-2013

Note: these figures are considerably less than the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament. It’s unclear why, but perhaps this doesn’t encompass all portions. In any event, we can at least see where people are coming from.

TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2004
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 13,812 37.1 1
United States 4,423 11.9 2
India 2,714 7.3 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 2,636 7.1 4
Japan 1,125 3.0 5
France 1,095 2.9 6
South Africa 918 2.5 7
Australia 847 2.3 8
China 537 1.4 9
South Korea 513 1.4 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 28,620 76.0
TOTAL — OTHERS 8,602 24.0
GRAND TOTAL 37,222 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2005
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 16,561 38.1 1
United States 4,721 10.9 2
India 3,560 8.2 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,179 7.3 4
France 1,233 2.8 5
Japan 1,042 2.4 6
South Africa 972 2.2 7
Australia 867 2.0 8
Germany 827 1.9 9
China 642 1.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 33,004 76.0
TOTAL — OTHERS 10,415 24.0
GRAND TOTAL 43,419 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2006
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 21,362 39.5 1
United States 4,924 9.1 2
India 4,249 7.9 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,568 6.6 4
France 1,509 2.8 5
Germany 1,225 2.3 6
Japan 1,055 2.0 7
South Korea 1,020 1.9 8
Australia 984 1.8 9
Thailand 847 1.6 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 40,743 75.5
TOTAL — OTHERS 13,275 24.5
GRAND TOTAL 54,018 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2007
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 32,451 41.4 1
India 6,250 8.0 2
United States 5,456 6.9 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 4,402 5.6 4
China 2,447 3.1 5
Mexico 2,337 3.0 6
France 1,928 2.5 7
Germany 1,905 2.4 8
South Korea 1,531 2.0 9
Australia 1,234 1.6 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 59,941 76.5
TOTAL — OTHERS 18,420 23.5
GRAND TOTAL 78,361 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2008
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 46,816 42.3 1
India 8,333 7.5 2
United States 6,305 5.7 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 5,812 5.3 4
Mexico 4,819 4.4 5
South Korea 2,922 2.6 6
Germany 2,743 2.5 7
China 2,727 2.7 8
France 2,309 2.1 9
Japan 1,684 1.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 78,165 70.7
TOTAL — OTHERS 32,464 29.3
GRAND TOTAL 110,629 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2009
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 51,019 45.3 1
India 8,287 7.4 2
United States 6,242 5.5 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 5,657 5.0 4
Mexico 4,467 4.0 5
South Korea 3,101 2.8 6
France 2,435 2.2 7
Germany 2,349 2.1 8
China 2,239 2.0 9
Japan 1,523 1.4 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 87,319 77.6
TOTAL — OTHERS 25,266 22.4
GRAND TOTAL 112,585 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2010
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 44,401 50.8 1
India 7,338 8.0 2
United States 5,044 5.5 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 4,165 4.5 4
Mexico 2,747 3.0 5
France 2,409 2.6 6
South Korea 2,305 2.5 7
China 1,717 1.9 8
Guatemala 1,468 1.6 9
Germany 1,378 1.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 72,972 79.2
TOTAL — OTHERS 19,182 20.8
GRAND TOTAL 92,154 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2011
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 36,984 45.3 1
India 5,728 7.0 2
United States 4,937 6.1 3
Mexico 4,019 4.9 4
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,749 4.6 5
France 2,664 3.3 6
South Korea 2,210 2.8 7
China 1,568 1.9 8
Guatemala 1,523 1.9 9
Jamaica 1,188 1.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 64,570 79.1
TOTAL — OTHERS 17,016 20.9
GRAND TOTAL 81,586 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2012
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 36,501 42.1 1
India 6,520 7.5 2
United States 5,741 6.6 3
United Kingdom, Colonies 4,052 4.7 4
Mexico 2,983 3.4 5
France 2,924 3.4 6
South Korea 2,517 2.9 7
Guatemala 2,036 2.3 8
China 1,632 1.9 9
Thailand 1,403 1.6 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 66,039 76.2
TOTAL — OTHERS 20,671 23.8
GRAND TOTAL 86,710 100
TEMPORARY FOREIGN WORKERS ADMITTED IN 2013
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Philippines 40,655 39.0 1
India 7,930 7.6 2
United States 5,861 5.6 3
United Kingdom 4,941 4.7 4
Mexico 4,226 4.1 5
South Korea 3,369 3.5 6
France 3,230 3.1 7
Guatemala 2,504 2.4 8
Jamaica 2,234 2.1 9
Ireland 2,078 2.0 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 77,028 74.0
TOTAL — OTHERS 27,132 26.0
GRAND TOTAL 104,160 100

Of course, this is just a snapshot from a decade, but it shows the patterns. It’s also worth noting that the TFWP has many pathways to extend visas, or to transition in permanent residents.

A quick look will show that Canada went from 37,000 or so visas in 2004, to issuing 104,000 in 2013. That has not gone on unnoticed.

3. Changes Made To Temporary Foreign Worker Program

This point had been made before, but is important to go over again. (See archive). In 2013/2014, the “Conservative” Government of Stephen Harper faced backlash for how many TFWs were coming into the Canada, and the effect of reducing wages.

Instead of making serious cuts — as was implied — the Government split up the program, and bumped up the number of people who could come under the International Mobility Programme. This had the effect of appearing (on paper) that significant reductions had occurred, but was really a sleight-of-hand.

The International Mobility Programme will be covered in greater detail later, but here is some background information on it.

And sure, there’s always the claim that immigration and temporary workers will grow the economy. Yes, but which economies? Perhaps many aren’t up to date on some of the statistics surrounding remittances sent abroad from Canada. Or sent globally.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

4. Documents Provided By Canadian Government

(A.0) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/index.html
(A.1) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1966.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1966
(A.2) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1967.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1967
(A.3) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1968.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1968
(A.4) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1969.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1969
(A.5) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1970.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1970
(A.6) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1971.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1971
(A.7) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1972.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1972
(A.8) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1973.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1973
(A.9) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1974.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1974
(A.10) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1975.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1975
(A.11) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1976.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1976
(A.12) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1977.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1977
(A.13) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1978.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1978
(A.14) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1979.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1979
(A.15) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1980.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1980
(A.16) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1981.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1981
(A.17) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1982.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1982
(A.18) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1983.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1983
(A.19) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1984.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1984
(A.20) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1985.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1985
(A.21) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1986.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1986
(A.22) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1987.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1987
(A.23) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1988.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1988
(A.24) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1989.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1989
(A.25) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1990.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1990
(A.26) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1991.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1991
(A.27) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1992.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1992
(A.28) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1993.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1993
(A.29) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1994.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1994
(A.30) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1995.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1995
(A.31) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1996.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1996

(B.0) https://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.505817/publication.html
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/reports-statistics/statistics-open-data.html
(B.1) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/cic/MP43-333-1999-eng.pdf
Canada Immigration Facts And Figures 1998
(B.2) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/MP43-333-2000E.pdf
(B.3) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2015/cic/Ci1-8-10-2013-eng.pdf
Temporary Migration In Canada 2004-2013

(C.0) Parliament Report Index
http://archive.is/vwM6G
(C.1) 2004 Report to Canadian Parliament
2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.2) 2005 Report to Canadian Parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.3) 2006 Report to Canadian Parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.4) 2007 Report to Canadian Parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.5) 2008 Report to Canadian Parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.6) 2009 report to Canadian Parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.7) 2010 Report to Canadian Parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.8) 2011 Report to Canadian Parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.9) 2012 Report to Canadian Parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.10) 2013 Report to Canadian Parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.11) 2014 Report to Canadian Parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.12) 2015 Report to Canadian Parliament
2015.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.13) 2016 Report to Canadian Parliament
2016.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.14) 2017 Report to Canadian Parliament
2017.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15) 2018 Report to CDN Parliament
2018.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15.2) 2019-2021 Supplemental Report
http://archive.is/onyev
(C.16) 2019 Report to Canadian Parliament
2019.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.17) 2020 Report to Canadian Parliament
2020.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.18) 2021 Report to Canadian Parliament
2021.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament

U.S. Customs And Border Protection: Some Statistics On The Invasion

This piece focuses on the problem that is the United States border, particularly the side with Mexico. There have been many interests vested in not securing it. Consequently, people flood in illegally, since there’s little reason not to.

Why should Canadians care about this?

The answer is simple: it’s not just an American problem. Open borders threatens the sovereignty of nations in general. Not only that, many of those illegal aliens will surely be working their way to Canada, given the generous welfare benefits available.

Unfortunately, far too few Canadians, including many “conservatives”, fail to realize that open borders changes everything. The makeup of the country impacts everything: voting patterns; finance; culture; crime; and future immigration policies. And the mantra “just come legally” misses the bigger picture.

For an earlier piece on the estimated real scale of illegals in the U.S., north of 22 million. There was also this gem in 2018, suing for the right to illegally enter the U.S.

Now, let’s get into some of the data from the USCBP, or the U.S. Customs and Border Patrol. The numbers are quite shocking indeed.

A note about “fiscal year”: Fiscal Year 2022 runs October 01, 2021 – September 30, 2022. All of the years seem to be done in this format.

“Recidivism” in the context of CBP refers to the percentage of people who are detained multiple times within the same fiscal year. It’s been approximately 25% the last few years, meaning 1/4 of people caught and forced to leave are caught again. There doesn’t seem to be much of a deterrent. As for drugs being brought in:

Month Marijuana Cocaine Heroin Meth Fentanyl Other
October 2021 376 220 0 290 73 3
November 2021 191 73 0 581 84 3
December 2021 127 102 66 559 26 4
January 2022 360 39 0 457 65 56
February 2022 785 90 2 268 12 27
March 2022 58 50 2 224 13 4
April 2022 259 186 14 479 174 19

Data from the 2022 fiscal year (thus far). The C.B.P. also provides recent statistics on the drug busts that have occurred from people trying to bring narcotics into the country. While it’s nice to have these seizures, it’s likely just a drop in the bucket as to what really goes on.

AGENCY INVOLVED FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22TD
Office of Field Operations Encounters 216,370 281,881 288,523 241,786 294,352 259,057
U.S. Border Patrol Total Encounters 310,531 404,142 859,501 405,036 1,662,167 1,219,920
Total Enforcement Actions 526,901 683,178 1,148,024 646,822 1,956,519 1,478,977

For “enforcement actions”, this refers to: individuals encountered at ports of entry who are seeking lawful admission into the United States but are determined to be inadmissible, individuals presenting themselves to seek humanitarian protection under our laws, and individuals who withdraw an application for admission and return to their countries of origin within a short timeframe. This is according to the CBP’s own definition.

In other words, it’s the number of people who show up LEGALLY to border ports of entry and then are turned away. It doesn’t cover the vast numbers who enter illegally between border ports.

CATEGORY FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22TD
Office Of Field Operations
Criminal Non-Citizens 10,596 11,623 12,705 7,009 6,567 9,101
NCIC Arrests 7,656 5,929 8,546 7,108 8,979 5,580
U.S. Border Patrol
Criminal Noncitizens Encountered 8,531 6,698 4,269 2,438 10,763 5,985
Criminal Noncitizens With Warrants 2,675 1,550 4,153 2,054 1,904 525

There have also been considerable amounts of arrests for people who either had criminal records, and/or outstanding warrants. This doesn’t include people who entered without being detected.

GANG ARRESTS FY15 FY16 FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22TD
18th Street 84 47 61 145 168 36 28 66
MS-13 335 253 228 413 464 72 113 149
Paisas 73 119 53 62 90 93 79 80
Other 352 283 194 188 254 162 128 98
Total 844 702 536 808 976 363 348 393

There have also been gang-related arrests of people attempting to enter the United States. Of course, not all are included, just a few which represent the larger numbers of arrests.

Concerning arrests of suspected terrorists (all nationalities), CBP provides some data of people detained at both the Southern and Northern borders.

TERRORISTS AT BORDER FY17 FY18 FY19 FY20 FY21 FY22TD
Southern Border 116 155 280 72 103 42
Northern Border 217 196 258 124 54 115
Total 333 351 538 196 157 157

How many encounters does the U.S. Government have overall? Thankfully, they do provide more data, and a lot of it is mind blowing.

Nationwide Encounters
.
Encounter data includes U.S. Border Patrol (USBP) Title 8 Apprehensions, Office of Field Operations (OFO) Title 8 Inadmissibles, and Title 42 Expulsions for fiscal years (FY) 2020, 2021, and 2022. Data is available for the Northern Land Border, Southwest Land Border, and Nationwide (i.e., air, land, and sea modes of transportation) encounters.

FISCAL YEAR 2019 2020 2021 2022
October 60,781 45,139 71,929 164,849
November 62,469 42,643 72,113 174,849
December 70,694 40,565 73,994 179,254
January 58,317 36,585 78,414 154,816
February 76,545 36,687 101,099 165,900
March 103,731 34,460 173,277 221,144
April 109,415 17,106 178,795 234,088
May 114,116 23,237 180,597
June 104,311 33,049 189,034
July 81,777 40,929 213,593
August 62,707 50,014 209,840
TOTAL 904,863 400,414 1,542,685 1,141,054 (so far)

Once more, how many people are simply sneaking in undetected?

The data can further be broken down by the type of person/people coming:

  • Accompanied Minors (AM)
  • Individuals in a Family Unit (FMUA)
  • Single Adults
  • Unaccompanied Children (UC)

While there are clearly a lot of people who get stopped by the various departments, an awful lot don’t. They are let in through some pathway, or just sneak in.

It also doesn’t help that there are countless Sanctuary Cities and States, which do an end run around border security. If people know they can get social services without the risk of being deported, many more will come.

Again, this is not just an American issue. Many of the hordes flooding into the U.S. will eventually make their way North. Canadians should absolutely be worried about this.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

Don’t worry, there will be much more included on this subject in the near future. This can’t be done justice by a single piece.

(1) https://www.cbp.gov/
(2) https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/cbp-enforcement-statistics
(3) https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/nationwide-encounters
(4) https://www.cbp.gov/newsroom/stats/southwest-land-border-encounters
(5) https://canucklaw.ca/true-scale-of-illegals-in-us-22-million-more-amnesty-coming/
(6) https://canucklaw.ca/tsce-2-migrant-caravan-lawyers-sue-for-right-to-legally-invade-u-s/
(7) https://canucklaw.ca/tsce-10b-sanctuary-cities-an-end-run-around-having-borders/

Canada Before 1970: Growing A Population Without Replacing It

In Western societies, there seems to be the mentality that populations must always grow. Furthermore, large numbers of people from very different backgrounds should be brought in to make this happen. At least, this is what public figures and media heads say, regardless of what the citizens want.

That being said, this “diversity” push is something that has only existed for the last 50 years or so. Before that, there was a focus on maintaining the demographic makeup. Let’s take a look.

A good starting place would be to see how many people are coming to Canada every year. Although this doesn’t tell the entire story, the numbers of Permanent Residents is a good place to start.

YEAR PERMANENT RESIDENTS % OF POPULATION
1852 29,307
1853 29,464
1854 37,263
1855 25,296
1856 22,544
1857 33,854
1858 12,339
1859 6,300
1860 6,276 0.2
1861 13,589 0.4
1862 18,294 0.6
1863 21,000 0.6
1864 24,779 0.7
1865 18,958 0.6
1866 11,427 0.3
1867 10,666 0.3
1868 12,765 0.4
1869 18,630 0.5
1870 24,706 0.7
1871 27,773 0.8
1872 36,578 1.0
1873 50,050 1.3
1874 39,373 1.0
1875 27,382 0.7
1876 25,633 0.6
1877 27,082 0.7
1878 29,807 0.7
1879 40,492 1.0
1880 38,505 0.9
1881 47,991 1.1
1882 112,458 2.6
1883 133,624 3.0
1884 103,824 2.3
1885 76,169 1.7
1886 69,152 1.5
1887 84,526 1.8
1888 88,766 1.9
1889 91,600 1.9
1890 75,067 1.6
1891 82,165 1.7
1892 30,996 0.6
1893 29,633 0.6
1894 20,829 0.4
1895 18,790 0.4
1896 16,835 0.3
1897 21,716 0.4
1898 31,900 0.6
1899 44,543 0.9
1900 41,681 0.8
1901 55,747 1.0
1902 89,102 1.6
1903 138,660 2.5
1904 131,252 2.3
1905 141,465 2.4
1906 211,653 5.3
1907 272,409 4.2
1908 143,326 2.2
1909 173,694 2.6
1910 286,839 4.1
1911 331,288 4.6
1912 375,756 5.1
1913 400,870 5.3
1914 150,484 1.9
1915 33,665 0.4
1916 55,914 0.7
1917 72,910 0.9
1918 41,845 0.5
1919 107,698 1.3
1920 138,824 1.6
1921 91,728 1.0
1922 64,224 0.7
1923 133,729 1.5
1924 124,164 1.4
1925 84,907 0.9
1926 135,982 1.4
1927 158,886 1.6
1928 166,783 1.7
1929 164,993 1.6
1930 104,806 1.0
1931 27,530 0.3
1932 20,591 0.2
1933 14,382 0.1
1934 12,476 0.1
1935 11,277 0.1
1936 11,643 0.1
1937 15,101 0.1
1938 17,244 0.2
1939 16,994 0.2
1940 11,324 0.1
1941 9,329 0.1
1942 7,576 0.1
1943 8,504 0.1
1944 12,801 0.1
1945 22,722 0.2
1946 71,719 0.6
1947 64,127 0.5
1948 125,414 1.0
1949 95,217 0.7
1950 73,912 0.5
1951 194,391 1.4
1952 164,498 1.1
1953 168,868 1.1
1954 154,227 1.0
1955 109,946 0.7
1956 164,857 1.0
1957 282,164 1.7
1958 124,851 0.7
1959 106,928 0.6
1960 104,111 0.6
1961 71,698 0.4
1962 74,856 0.4
1963 93,151 0.5
1964 112,606 0.6
1965 146,758 0.7
1966 194,743 1.0
1967 222,876 1.1
1968 183,974 0.9
1969 164,531 0.8
1970 147,713 0.7
1971 121,900 0.6
1972 122,006 0.6
1973 184,200 0.8
1974 218,465 1.0
1975 187,881 0.8
1976 149,429 0.6
1977 114,914 0.5
1978 86,313 0.4
1979 112,093 0.5
1980 43,137 0.6
1981 128,641 0.5
1982 121,175 0.5
1983 89,186 0.4
1984 88,272 0.3
1985 84,347 0.3
1986 99,355 0.4
1987 152,079 0.6
1988 161,588 0.6
1989 191,555 0.7
1990 86,452 0.6
1991 232,806 0.8
1992 254,790 0.9
1993 256,641 0.9
1994 224,385 0.8
1995 212,865 0.7
1996 226,071 0.8
1997 216,035 0.7
1998 174,195 0.6
1999 189,951 0.6
2000 227,456 0.7
2001 250,637 0.8
2002 229,048 0.7
2003 221,349 0.7
2004 235,823 0.7
2005 262,242 0.8
2006 251,640 0.8
2007 236,753 0.7
2008 247,247 0.7
2009 252,172 0.7
2010 280,689 0.8
2011 248,748 0.7
2012 257,887 0.7

Source for this chart is that data provided on page 3. Also, data for some earlier years is provided by Statistics Canada.

Even though large numbers of people have been coming to Canada for a long time, there was still a lot of social cohesion. This is because migrants were primarily selected from countries with a very similar makeup and composition.

Historically, the numeric predominance of those of British and French origin was unquestionable. Before the great wave of European migration to Canada between 1896 and the beginning of the First World War, Canada’s population was indeed mainly made up of those of British and French origin. For example, the 1871 Census of Canada shows that 60 percent of Canada’s 3.5 million people were of British origin, and 30 percent French origin; Europeans not of British nor French origin accounted for only 7 percent of Canada’s population in 1871 as well as in 1881 (Kalbach, 1990: 24). This demographic composition basically persisted until the turn of the century.

The wave of immigration to Canada prior to the First World War began to increase the stock of Europeans not from British or French origin. Between 1896 and 1914, over three million immigrants came to Canada. When the supply of emigrants from England and Western Europe was dwindling, Canada began accepting people from Eastern and Southern Europe, including Poles, Ukrainians, Hutterites and Doukhobors. In the period between the two world wars from 1915 to 1945, another two million immigrants came to Canada (Statistics Canada, 1983: A125-163).

The census data of Canada indicate that Canadians of European origin other than British and French increased from 8.5 percent of the total population in 1901 to 14.2 percent in 1921, and to 17.8 percent in 1941 (Kalbach, 1990: 24). In contrast, Canadians of British origin declined in relative terms from 57 percent of the total population in 1901 to 50 percent in 1941, but those of French origin remained at around 30 percent of the total population in 1901 and in 1941. In short, if the composition of Canadians of European origin other than British and French is used as an indicator of ethnic plurality, then there was an increase in diversity between 1901 and 1941. However, Canada’s population in 1941, as in 1871, was made up of people mainly of European origin, which accounted for 98 percent of the total population in 1941 and in 1871, despite the fact that the population had increased from 3.5 million people in 1871 to 11.5 million people in 1941.

The Government of Canada openly admits that traditionally, the bulk of immigration came from Europe. More specifically, it came from the West, from places like Britain and France. (See archive).

And what was the result of this? Very little in terms of enclaves or balkanization. The population grew, but without the genocidal “multicultural” push that goes around now. This type of system focused on cultural compatibility, something that would be unthinkable today.

TIME PERIOD REGION # OF MIGRANTS % OF TOTAL
1968-1972 Europe 387,670 52.6
United States 114,615 15.5
Central/South America 24,863 3.4
Carribean 53,100 7.2
Asia 112,584 15.3
Africa 22,014 3
Australia 18,656 2.5
Oceania 0 0
Not Stated 3,622 0.5
Total 737,124 100
1973-1977 Europe 324,131 37.9
United States 102,141 11.9
Central/South America 63,598 7.4
Asia 216,837 25.4
Africa 42,748 5
Australia 10,870 1.3
Oceania 7,937 0.9
Not Stated 0 0
Total 854,889 100
1978-1982 Europe 196,546 33.2
United States 49,407 8.4
Central/South America 36,262 6.1
Carribean 39,362 6.7
Asia 236,596 40
Africa 21,946 3.7
Australia 6,438 1.1
Oceania 4,502 0.8
Not Stated 232 0
Total 591,291 100
1983-1987 Europe 124.344 24.42
United States 36,214 7.1
Central/South America 56,442 11
Carribean 39,079 7.6
Asia 226,326 44.1
Africa 24,027 4.7
Australia 2,774 0.5
Oceania 3,771 0.7
Not Stated 38 0
Total 513,015 100
1988-1992 Europe 237,666 22.6
United States 33,686 3.2
Central/South America 91,061 8.7
Carribean 59,911 5.7
Asia 545,410 51.9
Africa 70,744 6.7
Australia 4,771 0.5
Oceania 8,534 0.8
Not Stated 0 0
Total 1,051,783 100
1993-1995 Europe 126,509 18.3
United States 19,433 2.8
Central/South America 39,199 5.7
Carribean 36,599 5.3
Asia 418,016 60.4
Africa 45,255 6.5
Australia 3,476 0.5
Oceania 3,791 0.5
Not Stated 0 0
Total 692,198 100

The Government’s own data tables show just how rapidly the source countries have been shifting. While immigration to Canada used to mainly be from Europe, it’s now overwhelmingly Asian. Looking at the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament in recent years, this trend has only gotten worse.

Now, were the voters ever asked if they wanted to become minorities?

Article I
The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.

Article II
In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:
(a) Killing members of the group;
(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

Article III
The following acts shall be punishable:
(a) Genocide;
(b) Conspiracy to commit genocide;
(c) Direct and public incitement to commit genocide;
(d) Attempt to commit genocide;
(e) Complicity in genocide.

Article IV
Persons committing genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III shall be punished, whether they are constitutionally responsible rulers, public officials or private individuals.

A Government doesn’t have to round up and execute its citizens in order to commit genocide. Another way is to flood the country with large numbers of very different people, with the purpose and intent of diluting and erasing the host population. Instead of having a national identity, society becomes “multicultural”.

One caveat of course: the people coming in are encouraged to maintain their own identities, customs, traditions, and language. The populations being replaced are expected to endlessly accommodate that.

If a larger population is needed, it’s entirely possible to grow it organically. However, modern efforts across the West can best be explained as attempting to erase groups entirely.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

(1) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2013/cic/Ci1-8-2012-eng.pdf
(2) https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/2011003/fig/fig3_1-2-eng.cfm
(3) https://justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/csj-sjc/jsp-sjp/rp02_8-dr02_8/t2.html
(4) https://archive.ph/QkUeu
(5) https://justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/csj-sjc/jsp-sjp/rp02_8-dr02_8/p2.html
(6) https://archive.ph/PzcO3
(7) https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/genocide-convention.shtml
(8) https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/documents/atrocity-crimes/Doc.1_Convention%20on%20the%20Prevention%20and%20Punishment%20of%20the%20Crime%20of%20Genocide.pdf
(9) UN Convention On Punishing And Preventing Genocide

Demographic Makeup Of People Entering Canada Illegally 2017-2021

Now for something that isn’t covered much by mainstream (or alternative) media. Who exactly is coming into Canada illegally, in between official border ports of entry? What are the numbers? Fortunately, the Immigration and Refugee Board has at least some information to share.

RANK COUNTRY INTAKE ACC REJ ABAN WD&O RESOLVED PENDING
n/a Total 60,544 25,802 18,010 1,059 3,404 49,000 11,544
1 Nigeria 16,374 4,739 7,279 189 1,785 13,992 2,382
2 Haiti 9,350 2,210 4,595 323 517 7,645 1,705
3 Colombia 3,565 1,629 486 57 117 2,289 1,276
4 Pakistan 2,406 1,184 670 21 115 1,990 416
5 DR Congo 2,165 479 416 36 145 1,076 1,089
6 Turkey 2,011 1,812 43 <20 <20 1,901 110
7 Sudan 1,694 1,372 123 25 77 1,597 97
8 Angola 1,486 420 381 <20 <20 865 621
9 Eritrea 1,224 1,004 <20 <20 105 1,178 46
19 U.S.A. 1,203 24 754 57 160 995 208
n/a All Others 19,066 10,929 3,205 308 305 15,472 3,594

ACC = Accepted
REJ = Rejected
ABAN = Abandoned
WD&O = Withdrawn And Other

**The IRB lists some totals as <20, and they claim that this is done for privacy reasons. The logic seems to be that if there were only a few who crossed, it would be easier to identify them.

The above totals are from February 2017 to December​​ 2021. The IRB claims that it didn’t have access to such information prior to this.

Isn’t this lovely, that the bulk of the people ILLEGALLY entering Canada are from the 3rd World? But let’s be fair, we don’t have nearly enough rocket scientists and brain surgeons here already. Keep in mind, these people have entered the United States — at some point — and decided to continue onwards. They’ve already passed on at least one safe country, one that gets hundreds of thousands of applications per year.

And again, this could be stopped very quickly. However, politicians (of all stripes) actively work against the interests of their own citizens.

(1) https://www.irb-cisr.gc.ca/en/statistics/Pages/irregular-border-crossers-countries.aspx
(2) https://archive.ph/x4T1i
(3) Wayback Machine

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