Chambers Of Commerce: Collecting Subsidies While Calling For Open Borders

According to the CEWS Registry, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy has been handed out to some 235 institutions that have “Chamber of Commerce” as part of their name. That should alarm people, that hundreds of organizations that claim to promote business are getting handouts from Ottawa — or rather, taxpayers.

The Chambers of Commerce are just part of a long list of institutions that are getting funded to shill the “pandemic” narrative. These include: restaurants and hotels, political parties, law firms, more law firms, churches, and trucking associations, to name a few.

While it would be unrealistic to do a profile on all 235 organizations, let’s take a look at one: The Canadian Chamber of Commerce.

Description of the organization’s activities
Founded in 1925, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce is the nation’s largest business association, representing small and large firms from every sector and region in Canada. The Canadian Chamber is a network of 420 community chambers and boards of trade across Canada, in addition to individual corporate members and over 80 trade and professional organizations. The total membership exceeds 192,000. It is dedicated to the promotion and development of a strong economy. The chamber monitors federal and international issues, solicits the views of the Canadian business community and communicates them to policymakers in Ottawa and internationally. Headquartered in Ottawa, it also has staff in Toronto, Montreal and Calgary.

This is how the group describes its activities.

Instead of calling for people to be able to run their businesses freely, and with minimal interference, the Chamber of Commerce parrots the line that vaccines and rapid tests are the quickest way back to normal. On the surface, it looks like they are playing along because of the financial incentives provided. More on that coming up.

The “wins” they brag about include getting CEWS and CERS extended. CERS is the Canada Emergency Rental Subsidy which is available for businesses. This “business” group also brags about getting the hiring subsidy created, so that taxpayers help fund new employees.

While this organization does receive private donations, it undeniably is getting Government handouts as well. In fact, this has been happening for many years.

GOVERNMENT BRANCH SOURCE YEAR AMOUNT
Bank of Canada 2019 $1,375.00
Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) 2015 $5,000.00
Canada Foundation for Innovation 2020 $2,300.00
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) 2021 $5,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2014 $10,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2015 $6,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2017 $6,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2018 $1,900.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2020 $10,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2021 $30,000.00
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) 2020 $850,623.60
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) 2021 $118,464.75
Competition Bureau Canada (COBU) 2016 $1,800.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2018 $3,400.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2019 $74,496.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2020 $22,451.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2021 $12,180
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2017 $56,548.68
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2018 $29,600.00
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2019 $2,500.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2014 $37,500.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2015 $29,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2016 $42,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2017 $63,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2018 $65,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2019 $65,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2020 $51,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2021 $79,100.00
Farm Credit Canada (FCC) 2018 $2,500.00
FedDev Agency for Southern Ontario 2018 $2,300.00
FedDev Agency for Southern Ontario 2020 $2,300.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2017 $1,900.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2018 $1,900.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2019 $2,300.00
Health Canada (HC) 2021 $4,947,978.19
Industry Canada 2014 $1,500.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2015 $1,800.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2016 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2018 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2019 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2020 $530,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2021 $2,300.00
Montreal Port Authority 2020 $5,000.00
Montreal Port Authority 2021 $5,000.00
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) 2015 $132,300.00
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) 2017 $22,122.12
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2014 $1,500.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2015 $1,800.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2016 $1,800.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2017 $1,900.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2019 $2,000.00
Office of the Procurement Ombudsman (OPO) 2020 $2,300.00
Office of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman 2018 $2,300.00
Ontario Federation of Agriculture 2020 $5,000.00
Port Alberni Port Authority 2016 $10,000.00
Prince Rupert Port Authority 2016 $4,500.00
Public Works and Government Services Canada 2014 $1,500.00
Royal Canadian Mint 2014 $2,500.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2014 $32,500.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2015 $10,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2016 $43,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2017 $65,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2018 $50,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2019 $40,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2020 $40,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2021 $57,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2016 $7,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2017 $18,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2019 $10,000.00
VIA Rail Canada 2020 $10,000.00
VIA Rail Canada 2021 $15,000.00

You’d be forgiven for thinking that these were really Communists. Now, what is the Chamber of Commerce getting for itself? The listings should scare you. Keep in mind, that other Chambers of Commerce are likely also receiving money at the local level.

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce has been getting handouts going back many years. The CEWS is really just the least of it. It would also be interesting to know what the conditions were for that nearly $5 million they received from Health Canada.

The Chamber doesn’t appear to call for the end to martial law restrictions. Instead, they lobby for more handouts in order to cope with lockdowns. For a business orientated group, they seem completely okay with Government interference and restrictions.

There also appears to be no issue with policies like vaccine passports. After all, if Canadians don’t want to play along, they can just be replaced by TFWs who took the shots as a condition of employment.

This group also calls for drastically increased immigration, and more ways to remain in Canada. They also support free trade which will see industries outsourced based on cost. Think about how this plays out in the long term.

[1] Flood Canada with more people, driving up demand for work
[2] Support trade deals which reduce the supply of available work

Never mind the social impacts of importing large numbers from very different backgrounds, or the culture clash that will result. It appears these business groups don’t care about such things.

If you think it’s bad now, the agenda from a few years back is even worse. Or perhaps it’s just more open about what they really wanted then.

BORDER CROSSINGS – Beyond the Borders Initiative, with respect to implementation of the action plan items.
BORDER CROSSINGS – with respect to the development of a new International Crossing between Windsor and Detroit.
FREE TRADE AGREEMENTS – Promote balanced free trade agreements for Canada with Europe, India Japan and Korea. Promote Canada’s participation in the Trans-Pacific partnership and in the Trade in Services Agreement
IMMIGRATION – Expedited application process with regard to giving priority to applicants who possess skills in short supply in Canada and processing their applications within 6-12 months.
IMMIGRATION – Foreign Credentials Recognition Program with regard to working with the provinces/territories and business community to develop national accreditation standards to evaluate foreign credentials, professional and trade qualifications, and certification in regulated and non-regulated occupations that reflect employers’ needs
IMMIGRATION: Changes intended to attract and retain international students with respect to work permits, applications for permanent residency, and processing times for applications.
IMMIGRATION: Changes to increase the number of economic immigrants to this country to double the current rate. Renegotiation and signing of new memoranda of understanding with each of the provinces and territories to increase provincial caps for Provincial Nominee Programs. Adequate staffing of local Citizenship and Immigration Canada offices to meet demand and alleviate the labour market shortages.
IMMIGRATION: Regional strategy for settlement needs and at levels of service to ensure access to skilled workers in all regions of the country.
International Trade: Expanding trade and investment links with developing countries.
Labour: Ensuring that any changes to the Canada Labour Code are implemented only if they address a real problem or result in improvement for these employers, their employee and/or the Canadians they serve.
Labour: Asking the federal government, specifically the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, to work with the Canadian private sector to identify ways to increase long-term formal employment opportunities for the poor in developing countries, and facilitate the availability of financial institutional products and services, including microfinance, to stimulate job creation for the poor

The above section includes items from 2014 (#36 on their profile with the Lobbying Registry). The Canadian Chamber of Commerce (and presumably all chapters) support virtually open borders as it ensures ready access to an endless supply of cheaper labour.

Put bluntly, Canadian taxpayers are helping to finance groups calling for outsourcing of industries, and the importing of a new work force for what’s left. It not only causes havoc with jobs, but drives down wages for the ones that remain.

Now, about those 235 groups receiving the CEWS:

  • 1000 ISLANDS GANANOQUE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ABBOTSFORD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Aboriginal Chamber Of Commerce – Grand Rapids
  • AIRDRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ALBERNI VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ALBERTA CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
  • ANNAPOLIS VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • AURORA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BAFFIN REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BANCROFT & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BATHURST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BATTLEFORDS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BEAUMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • BONNYVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • BOW VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • BRACEBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRANDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRAZIL-CANADA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRIGHTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BROCKVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BURLINGTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BURNS LAKE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA DELL’ ONTARIO/ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF ONTARIO
  • CAMPBELL RIVER AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMROSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CANADIAN GERMAN CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE INC
  • Canadian Women’s Chamber of Commerce
  • CASTLEGAR & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CENTRE WELLINGTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BRANTFORD-BRANT
  • CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SERVING COQUITLAM, PORT COQUITLAM PORT MOODY
  • Chamber of Marine Commerce CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE MARITIME
  • Chambre de commerce Canada-Floride/ Chamber of commerce Canada-florida
  • Chambre de commerce de l’Est de Montréal Eastern Montreal Chamber of Commerce
  • CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE ET D’INDUSTRIE DE BÉCANCOUR NICOLET-YAMASKA / BECANCOUR NICOLET-YAMASKA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHARLOTTETOWN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHATHAM-KENT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHETWYND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHILLIWACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CLOVERDALE DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Coboconk, Norland & Area Chamber of Commerce
  • COLD LAKE REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • COLUMBIA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CORNWALL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • COWICHAN LAKE DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CRANBROOK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DAWSON CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • DAWSON CREEK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DELTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DRUMHELLER AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DRYDEN DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DUNCAN-COWICHAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EAST GWILLIMBURY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EAST HANTS AND DISTRICTS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Eastern Prince Edward Island Chamber of Commerce Inc.
  • EDMONTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EDMUNDSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE/LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE LA REGION D’EDMUNDSTON INC
  • ESTEVAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FENELON FALLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FERNIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT FRANCES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT MACLEOD AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT MCMURRAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT NELSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT SASKATCHEWAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT ST JOHN AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FREDERICTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GANDER & AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC
  • GEORGINA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GIBSONS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRANDE PRAIRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRAVENHURST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER BARRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER KINGSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER LANGLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER NANAIMO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER NIAGARA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER OSHAWA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER PETERBOROUGH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce
  • GREATER SUDBURY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER VERNON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER VICTORIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRIMSBY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GUANGDONG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (CANADA)
  • GUELPH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALIBURTON HIGHLANDS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALIFAX CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALTON HILLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HUMBOLDT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CORP.
  • HUNTSVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • INDO-CANADA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • INNISFAIL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN CANADA – WEST/CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA IN CANADA – OVEST
  • JASPER PARK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KAMLOOPS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KAWARTHA LAKES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE-EASTERN REGION
  • KELOWNA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KENORA AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KENSINGTON AND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KIMBERLEY BAVARIAN SOCIETY
  • KINDERSLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KITIMAT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE GASPE – /GASPÉ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE MANIWAKI-THE MANIWAKI CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE ITALIENNE AU CANADA. ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN CANADA CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA IN CANADA
  • LA CRETE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LAB WEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LABRADOR NORTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • LAC LA BICHE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Lacombe and District Chamber of Commerce
  • LADYSMITH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LAKE COUNTRY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LEAMINGTON DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LEDUC REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LETHBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LINCOLN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LINDSAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LLOYDMINSTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MEDICINE HAT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MILTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MOOSE JAW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MORDEN AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MOUNT PEARL PARADISE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MUSKOKA LAKES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NELSON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NEW WESTMINSTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NEWMARKET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NORTH BAY AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Northumberland Central Chamber of Commerce
  • NWT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • OAKVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ORILLIA AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ORO-MEDONTE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • OWEN SOUND & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PARKSVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEACE RIVER BOARD OF TRADE AND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEACHLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEMBERTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PENTICTON AND WINE COUNTRY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PLACENTIA AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PONOKA & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • PORT HARDY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PORT HOPE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • POWELL RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PRAIRIE SKY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • PRINCE GEORGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • QUESNEL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • QUINTE WEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RADIUM HOT SPRINGS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RED DEER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • REGINA & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RENFREW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • REVELSTOKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RICHMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RUSSELL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SALT SPRING ISLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SARNIA LAMBTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SASKATCHEWAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SAUGEEN SHORES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SAULT STE MARIE AND DISTRICT OF CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SELKIRK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC
  • SHERWOOD PARK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SICAMOUS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SIMCOE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SMITHERS DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SMITHS FALLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOCIETY OF THE MORINVILLE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOUTH SURREY AND WHITE ROCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Springfield Chamber of Commerce Inc.
  • SQUAMISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
  • ST. ALBERT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • ST PAUL & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • ST THOMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • STONY PLAIN & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • STRATHROY AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SUMMERLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SUSSEX AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • SWIFT CURRENT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SYLVAN LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE ARMSTRONG-SPALLUMCHEEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE BRITISH COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CALGARY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA
  • THE EDSON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce
  • THE GREATER MONCTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE GREATER SUMMERSIDE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE HAMILTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE MACKENZIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE MANITOBA CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
  • THE MOUNT FOREST DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PARRY SOUND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PAS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PERTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE SAANICH PENINSULA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE TABER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • The Winkler and District Chamber of Commerce
  • THE WINNIPEG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THUNDER BAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TILLSONBURG DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TIMMINS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TOBERMORY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TOFINO-LONG BEACH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Trail Chamber of Commerce
  • TRENT HILLS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TRURO AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • UCLUELET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VAUGHAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VEGREVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VERMILION CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WASKESIU CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WELLAND/PELHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST PRINCE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST SHORE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST VANCOUVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEYBURN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITBY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITCHURCH STOUFFVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITECOURT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITEHORSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WIARTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WILLIAMS LAKE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Windsor-Essex Regional Chamber of Commerce
  • WOODSTOCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YARMOUTH AND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YELLOWKNIFE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YORKTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Do you get it now? Your tax dollars are being used to support these “Chambers of Commerce”. These groups lobby Federal and Provincial Governments to spend even more money propping up businesses which impose mask and vaccine rules. They also support the open border agenda to mass import people who will work for less, and who are more receptive to taking experimental shots.

In many ways, this comes across as a protection racket. These groups push for certain “safety” grants and measures for their members, but always ones that profit them as well.

(1) https://chamber.ca/
(2) https://chamber.ca/campaign/business-led-recovery/
(3) https://chamber.ca/advocacy/wins-for-canadian-business/
(4) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/cews/srch/pub/bscSrch
(5) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?regId=812012&cno=15787#regStart

(A) https://canucklaw.ca/media-subsidies-and-govt-financing/
(B) https://canucklaw.ca/media-controlled-opposition/
(C) https://canucklaw.ca/groups-calling-for-vaccine-passports-heavily-subsidized-by-government/
(D) https://canucklaw.ca/trudeau-using-taxpayer-money-to-subsidize-opposition-parties-liberals-too/
(E) https://canucklaw.ca/law-firms-bar-associations-receiving-canada-emergency-wage-subsidy-cews/
(F) https://canucklaw.ca/conflicting-out-its-not-just-cews-that-the-lawyers-are-receiving/
(G) https://canucklaw.ca/following-the-money-why-are-churches-really-pushing-the-vaxx-agenda
(H) https://canucklaw.ca/canadian-trucking-alliance-raising-lots-of-questions-lately/

Canadian Trucking Alliance Raising Lots Of Questions Lately

Underway right now a very, VERY large group of truck drivers is heading to Ottawa to protest mandatory vaccinations and to demand that policy be rescinded. Now, do their associations have their backs? Not in the slightest.

The Canadian Trucking Alliance made waves recently when they condemned the planned “convoy to Ottawa”. From their own statement:

The vast majority of the Canadian trucking industry is vaccinated with the overall industry vaccination rate among truck drivers closely mirroring that of the general public. Accordingly, most of our nation’s hard-working truck drivers are continuing to move cross-border and domestic freight to ensure our economy continues to function.

The Canadian Trucking Alliance (CTA) does not support and strongly disapproves of any protests on public roadways, highways, and bridges. CTA believes such actions – especially those that interfere with public safety – are not how disagreements with government policies should be expressed. Members of the trucking industry who want to publicly express displeasure over government policies can choose to hold an organized, lawful event on Parliament Hill or contact their local MP. What is not acceptable is disrupting the motoring public on highways and commerce at the border.

“The Government of Canada and the United States have now made being vaccinated a requirement to cross the border. This regulation is not changing so, as an industry, we must adapt and comply with this mandate,” said CTA president Stephen Laskowski. “The only way to cross the border, in a commercial truck or any other vehicle, is to get vaccinated.”

Instead of supporting the people who pay their salaries, the C.T.A. makes the suggestion to “call your Member of Parliament”. That’s interesting, considering that all parties are pretty much on board with the same thing. Like so many unions and association groups before, the C.T.A. seems content to throw the workers under the bus. On the surface this is alarming.

The C.T.A does not exist in isolation. Provincial counterparts make up this group, giving it more political power, and ability to influence policy.

Another red flag is that several of the groups that make up the Canadian Trucking Alliance have been receiving CEWS, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy. This includes British Columbia, Alberta, and the Atlantic Provinces. Right there, loyalty to the members is tested against the best interests of their employees.

Yes, this is beating a dead horse, but plenty of industries are taking the blood money. This includes: restaurants and hotels, political parties, law firms, more law firms, and churches, to name a few.

In November 2020, the Manitoba Trucking Association received a $125,000 grant from the Western Economic Diversification Program. The stated goal was helping companies adapt to the “pandemic” circumstances in their businesses. Previously, they had taken $268,000 back in 2014. The Atlantic Provinces Trucking Associaton received $37,500 back in 2013 from the Federal Government.

In a move that should surprise no one, the C.T.A. regularly lobbies the Federal Government on a number of issues. Readers of this site should expect this. One item to note is immigration:

“Immigration – related to temporary foreign worker program and support for demand driven immigration allowances specific to assisting shortage of qualified truck drivers.”

While the C.T.A. is putting the screws to its own people, and supporting vaccine mandates, they are also calling on Ottawa to make it easier to import a replacement workforce. Presumably, the people coming into the country will only be able to as a condition of taking the shots (2 or 3 so far). The Saskatchewan Trucking Association — a member group — is also pushing to have an increase in immigration to import more truck drivers. So did their Ontario counterpart in 2019. What sort of picture are we getting here?

[1] Force Canadians out, or to retire, with mandatory medical procedure.
[2] Import new truckers who would be willing to work for less, and take the shots.

Unfortunately, this is hardly the only industry where this is happening.

If you think the trucking groups are only lobbying Federally, you would be very much mistaken. It continues on:

TIME GOVERNMENT BRANCH AMOUNT
2018 WorkSafeBC $1,826,134
2019 Employment and Social Development Canada $22,000
2019 Ministry of Transportation & Infrastructure $1,400,000
2019 Natural Resources Canada $20,000
2019 WorkSafeBC $1,393,716
2020-01-15 to 2021-12-31 WorkSafeBC $4,641,567
2020-03-31 to 2021-03-31 Transportation and Infrastructure $1,540,000

The British Columbia Trucking Association (which is part of C.T.A.) has regularly been receiving money both Provincial and Federal Governments. That may explain why there is no real opposition to forcing the truckers to take the experimental shots. In fact, C.T.A. put out a joint statement with Ottawa on the topic of vaccinating workers.

Why does the Canadian Trucking Alliance support mandatory vaccines, and object to the protests in Ottawa? Maybe, just maybe, their interests aren’t with the individual truckers. Perhaps, money does influence policy positions.

Taking a quick look through CEWS and other Federal grants, there are plenty of trucking companies who are receiving handouts as well. This would explain why so many are on board with vaccine mandates.

Instead of looking out for workers, the C.T.A. touts the advantage of a projected driver shortage claiming it will ultimately drive up wages. Sure, except for the people who were let go.

(1) https://cantruck.ca/canadian-trucking-alliance-statement-to-those-engaged-in-road-border-protests/
(2) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/srch/pub/advncdSrch
(3) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/wd-deo,GC-WD-DEO-2020-2021-Q3-1103,current
(4) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/wd-deo,GC-WD-DEO-2013-2014-Q4-00142,current
(5) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/acoa-apeca,276-2013-2014-Q1-00004,current
(6) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?cno=622&regId=916231#regStart
(7) https://www.lobbyistsregistrar.bc.ca/app/secure/orl/lrs/do/vwRg?cno=596&regId=56562530
(8) https://www.sasklobbyistregistry.ca/search-the-registry/registration-details/?id=a541fccd-1c72
(9) https://www.canada.ca/en/transport-canada/news/2022/01/declaration-commune-des-ministresalghabra-oregan-et-qualtrough-et-du-president-de-lalliance-canadienne-du-camionnage.html
(10) https://cantruck.ca/vaccine-mandate-leading-to-better-driver-pay-carrier/
(11) https://ctacanada.com/quality-service/

(A) https://canucklaw.ca/media-subsidies-and-govt-financing/
(B) https://canucklaw.ca/media-controlled-opposition/
(C) https://canucklaw.ca/groups-calling-for-vaccine-passports-heavily-subsidized-by-government/
(D) https://canucklaw.ca/trudeau-using-taxpayer-money-to-subsidize-opposition-parties-liberals-too/
(E) https://canucklaw.ca/law-firms-bar-associations-receiving-canada-emergency-wage-subsidy-cews/
(F) https://canucklaw.ca/conflicting-out-its-not-just-cews-that-the-lawyers-are-receiving/
(G) https://canucklaw.ca/following-the-money-why-are-churches-really-pushing-the-vaxx-agenda

Ottawa Doling Out Grants For Development Of Artificial Intelligence, Job Market To Be Crushed

An issue that isn’t covered often enough is the role of automation and artificial intelligence on the labour market. While employment rates rise and fall, the prevalence of these new technologies is certain to have devastating effects on the amount of jobs available.

What happens when large numbers of people find that their fields no longer exist? What happens when professionals who have spent decades learning a trade or skill see it evaporate almost overnight? The long and short term effects of this are something essential to cover.

It should be noted that many who champion this next industrial revolution are also advocates of open borders and mass economic immigration. They also support so-called free trade, or globalization, which sees companies outsourced simply to reduce production costs. What happens when these are combined? In terms of supply and demand, this isn’t difficult to figure out.

[1] Continue high levels of immigration
[2] Outsource work to 3rd world to reduce costs (where possible)
[3] Slash available jobs and industries to work in locally

It gets even worse. Not only is this happening in Canada, but large amounts of taxpayer money are used to accelerate the collapse of the job market. The examples below are just a portion of what is being handed out under the title of “artificial intelligence”.

ORGANIZATION DATE AMOUNT
AbCellera Biologics Inc. Apr. 14, 2020 $175,631,000
AIMS Global Secretariat Aug. 26, 2020 $2,500,000
Alberta Machine Intelligence Institute Jul. 12, 2019 $2,750,000
Algolux Inc. Mar. 1, 2021 $667,000
AltaML Inc. Nov. 23, 2020 $1,000,000
Apollo Machine & Welding Ltd. Apr. 1, 2021 $581,500
Association des médecins vétérinaires practiciens Apr. 9, 2021 $998,456
Ayogo Health Inc. Oct. 2, 2018 $1,730,740
BoG of NorQuest Col & Concordia Uni Dec. 30, 2019 $1,150,000
CAE Inc. Jul. 16, 2018 $150,000,000
CAE Inc. Jan. 28, 2021 $190,000,000
Canadensys Aerospace Corporation Oct. 8, 2020 $2,498,664
Canadian Agri-Food Automation and Intelligence Network Inc. Jul. 6, 2020 $49,500,000
Canadian Agri-Food Automation and Intelligence Network Inc. Jul. 7, 2020 $30,000,000
Canadian Forage and Grassland Association Jul. 3, 2020 $996,032
Carleton University Aug. 15, 2019 $1,500,000
Circle Cardiovascular Imaging Inc. Nov. 19, 2020 $2,647,000
COENCORP Consultant Corporation May 1, 2021 $600,000
Cognitive Systems Corp. Aug. 22, 2018 $7,268,261
COREM Aug. 8, 2019 $860,000
Council of Canadian Academies Jan. 7, 2020 $1,147,956
Eddyfi NDT inc. Nov. 9, 2018 $1,550,675
Ecoation Innovative Solutions Inc. Aug. 24, 2020 $3,875,000
Element AI Inc. Jun. 10, 2020 $20,000,000
Enns Brothers Ltd. Jul. 1, 2020 $660,000
Fluidigm Canada Inc. Jun. 1, 2018 $650,000
Giatec Scientific Inc. Oct. 1, 2018 $800,000
Genov, Roman Apr. 1, 2017 $1,136,025
Governors of the University of Alberta Oct. 29, 2018 $2,500,000
Governing Council of the University of Toronto Aug. 3, 2018 $25,000,000
Governing Council of the University of Toronto Mar. 30, 2019 $17,000,000
Governing Council of the University of Toronto Dec. 1, 2020 $1,254,375
Imagia Cybernétique Inc. Aug. 31, 2018 $1,000,000
Information Technology Association of Canada Nov. 1, 2018 $1,980,358
Linamar Corporation Jul. 6, 2018 $49,000,000
Lytica Inc Nov. 6, 2019 $1,080,000
Mckee Demczyk, Debbie Mar. 7, 2018 $2,000,000
McMaster University Oct. 18, 2019 $1,479,441
MindBridge Analytics Inc. May 1, 2019 $14,500,000
Miru Smart Technologies Corp. Apr. 1, 2021 $600,000
Mission Control Space Services Inc. Feb. 3, 2021 $3,042,959
Montréal International Jul. 9, 2020 $9,480,000
North Inc. Nov. 8, 2018 $24,000,000
North Inc. Oct 31, 2018 $24,000,000
Octopusapp Inc. Sep. 1, 2020 $3,000,000
OCED Aug. 27, 2020 $982,000
Purdie, Thomas G Apr. 1, 2013 $651,061
Savormetrics Inc. Nov. 30, 2018 $867,000
Scale.AI Mar. 15, 2018 $229,765,127
Sheikhzadeh, Mehdi Mar. 7, 2018 $2,000,000
SSIMWAVE Apr. 1, 2019 $4,232,550
Sunnybrook Research Institute May 21, 2019 $49,000,000
Tangent Design Engineering Ltd. Feb. 1, 2017 $600,000
Tangent Design Engineering Ltd. Aug. 1, 2021 $700,000
Technologies Numetrix inc. Jun. 8, 2021 $608,288
Teledyne Digital Imaging Inc. Jul. 15, 2020 $1,000,000
Terry Fox Research Institute & Imagia Cybernetics Inc. Aug. 28, 2020 $49,000,000
Tessonics Inc. Apr. 1, 2021 $600,000
University of British Columbia Jan. 1, 2020 $1,203,433
University of Manitoba Mar. 5, 2021 $1,603,078
Valacta Limited Partnership Dec. 2, 2019 $566,617
Vineland Research and Innovation Centre Apr. 1, 2018 $4,138,197

This is by no means all of the grants, just the larger ones listed.

Keep in mind, while Canada continues to bring record numbers of people into the country, we are automating entire industries. This will lead to massive losses of employment for those already here. The result is far more people, competing for far fewer positions. This sort of thing typically leads to much lower wages and benefits.

Getting artificial intelligence into aerospace and highly technical fields seems harmless enough, but it’s not going to stop there. Proponents of the AI trend never seem to realize that their jobs can also be automated out of existence as well.

This AI push will also impact the low skill market as well, and nothing is off the table. One such grant involves spending over $4 million to implement AI into the agricultural industry, and to automate a lot of the more “low skill” work. Another grant was for $30,000,000. Depending on the locations, this could mean the lack of any other options for many.

Far from being hyperbolic, automation replacing jobs has happened for decades, and will continue to do so. The service industry seems to be next on the list. Does anyone seriously think that workers will be hired back once replaced by robots? What happens to the people who can’t find work as a result of this?

Without an alternative in place for the people impacted by these drastic changes, expect chaos and instability to result from this initiative.

An interesting side note: the “political left” typically opposes free trade and globalization for the reason that it undercuts wages, and sees jobs shipped overseas. In short, decent work disappears. Mass automation will have much the same effect, and yet, silence from those same activists. How strange.

As for the “political right”: how exactly does gutting entire industries help secure an economic recovery? This trend is surely going to get worse.

Seriously, who thought this was a good idea for society?

(1) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc
(2) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/?sort=agreement_start_date_s%20desc&page=1&search_text=artificial%20intelligence
(3) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/csa-asc,003-2020-2021-Q4-04881,current
(4) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/aafc-aac,235-2018-2019-Q3-00066,current
(5) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/id/ic,230-2021-2022-Q1-0143,current
(6) https://www.cnbc.com/2021/10/22/restaurants-looking-for-labor-and-speed-turn-to-robots-.html

Some Thoughts On Why Flair Airlines Supports The Mandatory Vaccination Policy

It seems a bit counter-intuitive that a discount airline would be so enthusiastic about the policy of mandatory vaccines for travelers. Flair Airlines is one such company. Then again, looking a bit deeper, there may be other reasons for doing this.

Specifically, it appears the Flair Airlines LTD. has been getting CEWS, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy. Of course, they are likely getting other subsidies as well.

After all, this company went from serious financial hurt, to being able to expand its operations across Canada. Such a sudden shift requires a lot of money.

A quick look through the Federal Lobbying Registry shows that Flair has been quite busy getting the attention of public office holders. The middlemen they send are also worthy of a closer look.

1. Saad Baig, StrategyCorp Inc

Saad Baig is a Director in StrategyCorp’s Public Affairs group and brings six years of experience advising senior cabinet ministers in the Government of Ontario.
.
Most recently, Saad was Senior Policy Advisor to the Minister of Finance where he was a pivotal part of the team that tabled Ontario’s first balanced budget in ten years. He served as the lead advisor to the Minister on matters relating to tax policy, economic policy and municipal finance. Saad led the development of the 2016 Fall Economic Statement and 2017 Ontario Budget in key areas including transportation, infrastructure, economic development and international trade.
.
Prior to joining the Ministry of Finance, Saad spent over three years as the lead advisor for infrastructure policy to several ministers where he participated in key negotiations on federal-provincial infrastructure matters, designed municipal funding programs, developed infrastructure planning legislation and coordinated policy and issues for two crown agencies.
.
Saad has been involved in numerous political campaigns at the municipal, provincial and federal levels including the 2014 central campaign for the Ontario Liberal Party.

This lobbyist for the discount airline spent 6 years in the Ontario Government, in a variety of roles, working for Kathleen Wynne and Dalton McGuinty.

2. Garry Keller, StrategyCorp Inc

Garry has served in several key leadership roles in Canadian politics, including as Chief of Staff to Canada’s Foreign Minister, John Baird; Chief of Staff to the Leader of the Opposition Rona Ambrose, and chief Parliamentary advisor to Prime Minister Stephen Harper. He also served as a Chief of Staff to the Government House Leader and the Chief Government Whip, Director of Communications to the Minister of the Environment and Director of Parliamentary Affairs to the President of the Treasury Board. He also served as Acting Chief of Staff to the United Conservative Party Caucus in Alberta in 2017.
.
As the Chief of Staff to the Foreign Minister, Garry was required to deliver strategic, communication and political advice on both international and domestic matters. He has experience in dealing with regulatory and legal matters, national security matters, trade negotiations, as well as the promotion of Canadian interests and Canadian values on the world stage. He is also an experienced practitioner of the Access to Information Act.
.
Garry regularly provides commentary on domestic and international politics for CTV News Channel, TVO’s The Agenda and a variety of talk radio shows across Canada. His commentary has also appeared in the National Post and the Globe and Mail, and he has appeared on a number of panels for associations and other organizations on Canadian politics.

Keller spent many years as a Conservative Party of Canada operative, and handler for various politicians. He also moved on to Alberta politics.

3. Sébastien Labrecque, StrategyCorp Inc

Before pivoting to government relations, Sébastien worked in the federal government, which led him to develop a thorough understanding of the inner workings of policy and research development in the public service. Thanks to his experience at Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation and Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada, Sébastien possesses an extensive knowledge of the policy and stakeholder ecosystems in the areas of housing finance and the digital economy.

Labrecque spent over a year and a half working for the Federal Government before he switched over and became a lobbyist.

4. Kristina Martin, Loyalist Public Affairs

Kristina is a seasoned strategic communications and government relations expert with over a decade of experience working in politics, government relations and the non-profit sector. Based in Ottawa, she knows the inner workings of Parliament Hill and is recognized as a connector and go-to advisor for corporate and nonprofit leaders to advance complex policy agendas.
.
Before joining Loyalist Kristina worked as Director of Communications and Public Affairs at Canada’s largest science and technology outreach organization, Actua. Prior to that she worked at a national government relations and strategic communication firm.
.
Kristina has also served as a communications and political advisor to federal elected officials.

Kristina Martin spent many years with the Federal Liberals when they were in opposition. Now that they are back in power, she’s in a position to wield some real influence.

5. Conal Slobodin, StrategyCorp Inc

Slobodin has since left StrategyCorp and gone to Walmart. However, he has held roles in the Federal Government, and is a former consultant for the Yukon Liberal Party. Small world.

6. Andrew Steele, StrategyCorp Inc

As a Vice President at StrategyCorp, Andrew emphasizes client service, creative solutions and professionalism. He provides counsel on management consulting projects, communications challenges and government relations files at the federal, provincial and municipal level.
.
Previously, Andrew served as Senior Advisor to the Premier of Ontario, as well as Chief of Staff in several Ministries. He has held senior campaign roles for the Liberal Party of Canada and the Ontario Liberal Party.
.
Andrew was the founding CEO of the Pecaut Centre, a non-profit management consulting firm housed at the Boston Consulting Group. More recently, Andrew was essential to implementing the strategic transformation of public broadcaster TVO into the province’s partner for digital learning inside the classroom.
.
A director of the board of the Michael Garron Hospital, Andrew graduated with distinction from the MBA program at Ivey. He writes regularly on public policy as an opinion columnist for the Globe and Mail and others.

Steele, by his own admission, has held senior campaign roles for both the Ontario Liberals, and the Federal Liberals. The connection to Michael Garron Hospital is an interesting one. That’s where Michael Warner, the pro-lockdown doctor, Michael Warner works. Melissa Lantsman, MP-elect for Thornhill, is also a Director.

As for Kenzie McKeegan, Dan Mader and Chris Froggatt, check out this piece on their recent work as Pfizer lobbyists. Have to wonder what all of these political hacks arranged in order for Flair to get onboard with these passports.

There doesn’t seem to be an obvious mention of a bailout, but it’s the most likely thing to search for. And they are definitely getting CEWS from the taxpayers.

(1) https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/airline-transportation-mandatory-vaccination-1.6206844?fbclid=IwAR38cd6IDeB-_TKKGxfRWnyNe9dg2VUons6nOc0Yp8_xKtll5xvazN9L8kM
(2) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/cews/srch/pub/bscSrch
(3) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/advSrch?V_SEARCH.command=refineCategory&V_TOKEN=1234567890&V_SEARCH.scopeCategory=solr.facetName.registrationStatus%3D1
(4) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/advSrch?V_SEARCH.command=navigate&time=1633983200675
(5) https://www.linkedin.com/in/saadbaig/
(6) https://strategycorp.com/people/baig-saad/
(7) https://archive.is/sgF3b
(8) https://www.linkedin.com/in/garry-keller-73130b79/
(9) https://strategycorp.com/people/keller-garry/
(10) https://archive.is/aFUE1
(11) https://www.linkedin.com/in/s%C3%A9bastien-labrecque-4497915b/
(12) https://strategycorp.com/people/labrecque-sebastien/
(13) https://archive.is/usIo6
(14) https://www.linkedin.com/in/kristina-martin-3b1b6741/
(15) https://loyalistpublicaffairs.ca/kristina-martin/
(16) https://archive.is/IFW5a
(17) https://www.linkedin.com/in/conal-slobodin/
(18) https://www.linkedin.com/in/andrewmsteele/?originalSubdomain=ca
(19) https://strategycorp.com/people/steele-andrew/
(20) https://canucklaw.ca/melissa-lantsmans-real-record-as-a-lobbyist-after-installing-doug-ford/

Bill C-11: Parliamentary Hearing On Facial Recognition Technology (May 10, 2021)

This was from a May 10, 2021 Parliamentary Committee Meeting on Bill C-11, and facial recognition. In some sense this hearing is academic, as Parliament was was dissolved over the summer. Nevertheless, it’s entirely possible that it will be brought back once the new session starts.

Also, as this so-called “pandemic” drags on, and resistance builds, will facial recognition become the norm at protests? Will this be a way to identify and target peaceful demonstrators?

Another point: while law enforcement or Canadian intelligence may be barred from using this facial recognition, will they simply outsource it to private companies? A possible argument would be that the police aren’t actually violating privacy laws, but just taking advantage of others that do.

THE WORLD’S LARGEST FACIAL NETWORK
Clearview AI provides law enforcement agencies with greater insight and lead generation through the use of our investigative platform. Our platform includes the largest known database of 10+ billion facial images sourced from public-only web sources, including news media, mugshot websites, public social media, and many other open sources.
.
Agencies that use our platform can expect to receive high-quality leads with fewer resources expended. These leads, when supported by other evidence, can help accurately and rapidly identify suspects, persons of interest, and victims to help solve and prevent crimes.

HOW DOES CLEARVIEW AI’S FACIAL SEARCH TECHNOLOGY WORK?
Clearview AI provides law enforcement agencies with investigative opportunities through the use of our research tool. Our platform includes the largest known database of 10+ billion facial images sourced from public-only web sources, including news media, mugshot websites, public social media, and many other open sources.

Clearview is called out by name in the House of Commons meeting. It’s quite interesting. Remember those pictures with your college buddies from 10-15 years ago on Facebook? Guess what, those may have been copied, real names attached, and used as reference points in the near future.

Of course, some private companies have already been using this type of technology for years. It’s not exactly revolutionary at this point. Last October, the story about Cadillac Fairview using this without people’s knowledge or consent in Ontario was broken

Anyhow, this story will need to be followed up on. In the meantime, it’s pretty chilling to see how accepting and tolerant public officials have become about its use.

(1) https://www.ourcommons.ca/DocumentViewer/en/43-2/ETHI/meeting-34/evidence
(2) May 10 Facial Recognition Parliamentary Hearing
(3) https://parlvu.parl.gc.ca/Harmony/en/PowerBrowser/PowerBrowserV2/20210510/-1/35421?Language=English&Stream=Video
(4) https://www.ourcommons.ca/Content/Committee/432/ETHI/Evidence/EV11321905/ETHIEV34-E.PDF
(5) https://www.clearview.ai
(6) https://www.clearview.ai/law-enforcement
(7) https://www.thestar.com/news/gta/2020/10/29/cadillac-fairview-broke-privacy-laws-by-using-facial-recognition-technology-at-malls-investigators-conclude.html

Canadian Biosafety Handbook: Information On Masks And Respiratory Protection (May 2016)

Ever wonder what the Federal guidelines say on employees having to wear masks or respirators? Take a look at the Canadian Biosafety Handbook, Second Edition, from May 2016. Section 9.1.6 has some pretty interesting information on that subject.

Incidently, thank you to this man, David Dickson, who mentioned the CBH in his speech, even in passing. See 23:10 for him addressing the issue. The original was posted by Angry Albertan. Yes, this brief statement warranted an investigation, and his reference turned out to be accurate.

Note: this is not to make any guarantee that the information in this handbook. Nonetheless, there is some interesting information available here.

2.2 Viruses
Viruses are the smallest of replicating organisms. Their small size (20-300 nm) allows them to pass through filters that typically capture the smallest bacteria. Viruses have no metabolism of their own and redirect existing host machinery and metabolic functions to replicate. Structurally, the simplest viruses consist of nucleic acids enclosed in a protein capsid (nucleocapsid). Enveloped viruses have a more complex structure in which the nucleocapsid is enclosed inside a lipid bilayer membrane; this membrane facilitates the virus’s interaction with the host cell.

Let’s look at this for a moment. Setting aside the issue that epidemiology is a pseudo-science at best, the Canadian Government claims viruses are between 20-300 nm, or nanometers. However, the mask guidelines listed below fall far, far below that standard.

If viruses actually were airborne, then these masks would provide no protection whatsoever. Then again, does this “virus” even exist?

9.1.6 Masks and Respiratory Protection
Safe operational practices and the use of primary containment devices can limit the creation of, and exposure to, infectious aerosols or aerosolized toxins. Surgical masks and many types of dust masks offer little protection from airborne pathogens, infectious aerosols, or aerosolized toxin, but will protect mucous membranes of the nose and mouth from spills and splashes. Masks are not intended to be used more than once. Respirators are used when there is a risk of exposure to aerosolized toxins or infectious aerosols that can be transmitted through the inhalation route. Respirators are divided into two classes: air purifying respirators and atmosphere-supplying respirators. The type of respirator selected will depend on the hazard associated with the particular activity being carried out. Personnel education on airborne hazards and training on respirator selection, fit, inspection, and maintenance are some examples of elements of a workplace respiratory protection program, which is required for any workplace where respirators are used. Where applicable, respiratory protection should conform to standard CSA Z94.4, Selection, Use and Care of Respirators.

9.1.6.1 Respirator Fit
All respirators need to fit properly in order to function as intended. Some types of respirators require a seal between the apparatus and the wearer’s face in order to provide adequate protection. Using the wrong respirator or misusing one can be as dangerous as not wearing one at all. The respirator should be individually selected and fitted to the operator’s face, and fit tested for its seal. Facial hair, imperfections of the skin, cosmetics, and changes in a person’s weight can affect respirator fit. Most jurisdictions within Canada currently require qualitative or quantitative fit-testing to be conducted to demonstrate proper fit for the selected respirator(s) before an individual carries out any activities that require respiratory protection. In addition, standard CSA Z94.4, Selection, Use, and Care of Respirators, requires that an employer take reasonable precautions to verify that an individual is medically cleared to wear a respirator. Proper use and care of respiratory protection equipment is a core component of the training program in workplaces where respirators are used.

9.1.6.2 Air Purifying Respirators
Air purifying respirators help reduce the concentration of microorganisms and particulates in the air inhaled by the user to an acceptable exposure level by passing the air through a particulate filter or chemical cartridge. Half-mask air purifying respirators cover the nose and mouth but not the eyes, while full-face air purifying respirators cover the entire face. Disposable half-mask air purifying respirators, including the N95 and N100 type respirators, are designed for single use. Non-powered half-mask and full-face respirators can also use disposable filter cartridges to provide a similar level of protection. Non-powered respirators work through the creation of negative-pressure inside the respirator during inhalation. There are nine classifications of particulate filters used with non-powered respirators approved by the United States National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). These are the N-Series (N95, N99, N100; not resistant to oil), R-Series (R95, R99, R100; oil-resistant), and P-Series (P95, P99, P100; oil-proof). The associated numbers identify the efficiency in removing contaminants. Respirators rated at N95 or higher are adequate to protect personnel carrying out most activities with microorganisms.

9.1.6.3 Powered Air Purifying Respirators
Powered air purifying respirators (PAPRs) create a positive-pressure around the wearer’s head. PAPRs are designed to be decontaminated and reused, and the disposable filter cartridges are replaced on a regular basis, as determined by an LRA. Particulate filters for PAPR units are all high efficiency (HE), which are certified to be 99.97% efficient at filtering the most penetrating particle size (0.3 µm). Due to the effects of impaction, diffusion, and interception, high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters are even more efficient for particles that are either smaller or larger than 0.3 µm. Most PAPR filters are suitable for use against oil-based aerosols; however, this is not always the case and users should check the manufacturer instructions before use in oil environments.

9.1.6.4 Atmosphere-Supplying Respirators
Atmosphere-supplying respirators deliver clean, breathable air from a source such as a compressed air cylinder or tank. These are generally supplied-air respirators, but could be a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). Supplied-air respirators deliver air through a small hose connected to an air compressor or a cylinder of compressed air, whereas SCBAs supply breathable air from a portable cylinder worn on the back.

Now, remember that viruses are (allegedly) 20-300 nanometers, according to Section 2.2. That is quite the range, and we are taking what they say at face value.

Section 9.1.6 starts by stating: “Surgical masks and many types of dust masks offer little protection from airborne pathogens, infectious aerosols, or aerosolized toxin, but will protect mucous membranes of the nose and mouth from spills and splashes”. So your bandana or teflon coated dental mask will achieve nothing.

Turning to 9.1.6.3, Powered air purifying respirators (or PAPRs) claim to be 99.97% effective at filtering particles of 0.3 µm, or 0.3 micrometers. However, do a little conversion: 0.3 µm = 300 nm. Considering that viruses are (supposedly) between 20-300 nm, even pressurized protection will only be effective at the upper range of this.

Funny how the experts never seem to address this.

(1) https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/canadian-biosafety-standards-guidelines/handbook-second-edition.html
(2) https://www.canada.ca/content/dam/phac-aspc/migration/cbsg-nldcb/cbh-gcb/assets/pdf/cbh-gcb-eng.pdf
(3) Canada Biosafety Handbook May 2016
(4) https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=878784959416690
(5) https://www.facebook.com/watch/live/?v=901642553914115
(6) https://www.bitchute.com/video/eBATI8iMdNM2/

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