IMM #22: How Many Students And Temporary Workers Actually Stay?

(StatsCan on % int’l students becoming permanent residents)

(StatsCan findings: close to 30% eventually become PR)

(StatsCan: latest cohort TFW/IMP transitioning at higher rates)

(StatsCan on int’l students, earnings growth)

(Federal Gov’t education strategy 2019-2024)

(Status of “Temporary” Foreign Workers transitioning to PR)

(Program launched in July 2019: PR-Path for illegals)

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

CLICK HERE, for #1: temp workers, other migration categories.
CLICK HERE, for #2: close to 1M people/year entering on visas.
CLICK HERE, for #3: CANZUK, expansion and erasing the borders.
CLICK HERE, for #4: population replacement programs in Canada.
CLICK HERE, for #5: replacement numbers/countries since 2004.
CLICK HERE, for #6: domestic abuse as pathway to PR status.
CLICK HERE, for #7: the International Mobility Program.
CLICK HERE, for #8: economic imm, remittances, brain drain.
CLICK HERE, for #9: global remittance estimates, regulations.
CLICK HERE, for #10: economic immigration when unemployment high.
CLICK HERE, for #11: TD article on true migration rates.
CLICK HERE, for #12: pilot amnesty-for-illegals program in Toronto.
CLICK HERE, for #13: work permits, health care for illegals.
CLICK HERE, for #14: getting legal residence via fraud.
CLICK HERE, for #15: student/family member to PR pipeline.
CLICK HERE, for #16: start up visas = buying PR/citizenship.
CLICK HERE, for #17: ghost students visas for immigration.
CLICK HERE, for #18: “inadmissibles” legally let in anyway.
CLICK HERE, for #19: birth rates in Canada since 1991.
CLICK HERE, for #20: main sources for demographic replacement.
CLICK HERE, for #21: demographic changes cause voting changes.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

2. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for StatsCan, info on Int’l students ==> PR.
http://archive.is/wip/B1ikY
CLICK HERE, for StatsCan, immigration, earnings.
http://archive.is/wip/s4x6I
CLICK HERE, for Federal education strategy 2019-2024.
http://archive.is/wip/NbQof
CLICK HERE, for StatsCan: status when obtaining PR.
http://archive.is/wip/O8GB0
CLICK HERE, for StatsCan, more on transition rates.
http://archive.is/wip/oc9vW

CLICK HERE, for CTV, Gov’t to start collecting exit info.
http://archive.is/wip/feDOA
CLICK HERE, for CBSA policies on exiting Canada.
http://archive.is/wip/krWR3
CLICK HERE, for CBSA cancelling old arrest warrants.
http://archive.is/4jQA9
CLICK HERE, for amnesty for illegals announced.
http://archive.is/e6OYZ
CLICK HERE, for Canadian Labour Congress on illegals.
http://archive.is/s3pq6
CLICK HERE, for 41,000 illegals gone missing.
http://archive.is/bayYs
CLICK HERE, for an estimate of total illegals.
http://archive.is/wip/Xk9l4

Annual Immigration Reports To Parliament
(a) 2004 Annual Report to Parliament
(b) 2005 Annual Report to Parliament
(c) 2006 Annual Report to Parliament
(d) 2007 Annual Report to Parliament
(e) 2008 Annual Report to Parliament
(f) 2009 Annual Report to Parliament
(g) 2010 Annual Report to Parliament
(h) 2011 Annual Report to Parliament
(i) 2012 Annual Report to Parliament
(j) 2013 Annual Report to Parliament
(k) 2014 Annual Report to Parliament
(l) 2015 Annual Report to Parliament
(m) 2016 Annual Report to Parliament
(n) 2017 Annual Report to Parliament
(o) 2018 Annual Report to Parliament
(p) Archived listings of Reports

3. Context For This Article

The topic of “temporary” mass migration to Canada is discussed here a lot. This is partly because of their size, and partly because various “temporary” programs actually lead to Permanent Resident status.

Three groups which receive regular attention are these:
(a) Temporary Foreign Worker Program;
(b) International Mobility Program;
(c) Student Visas

Now, it has been asked several times: how many of these people actually do stay? Of course, this is a logical follow-up question. Obviously, not everyone will stay after their work of schooling ends.

However, it’s not so easy to answer. Yes, we have data suggesting that approximately one quarter or more (25-30%) do attain PR status. That is pretty straightforward information to get a hold of.

But after that, things are much less clear. Until 2016, Canada did not track people leaving the country (only entering). Even today it does not cover everyone. This is unlike nearly every other developed nation, which tracks both entry and exits across borders. Also, the Federal Government does not make easily available (if it even knows), how many people apply for other visas or programs. Worse, it has been discovered that the CBSA deletes older arrest warrants. Additionally, there is little reliable information accessible on how many people are working illegally, or receiving public benefits illegally.

Back to the question of: “How many people stay?”
My answer: At least 25-30%. Probably a lot more.

4. People Leaving Canada Aren’t Tracked

In 2016, the Federal Government announced plans to start collecting exit information from people leaving the country. This really is common sense. While we (theoretically) know how many people, who, and when, are ENTERING Canada, until now they Government doesn’t track who is LEAVING. Perhaps we just take it on face that everyone leaves when they should.

And one of the major benefits stated is to help reduce immigration fraud. If a person is “counting time” towards living in Canada, but doesn’t actually live here, then the Immigration Ministry should know about it.

When this does get implemented, then a gaping hole in Canadian border security should be fixed, right? Maybe not.

Canada collects basic biographic information on travellers who enter and leave the country by land to ensure complete travel history information is available, thereby strengthening the management of our border.

Biographic entry information is routinely collected directly from all travellers entering Canada upon presentation to a CBSA officer at a port of entry as part of the primary inspection process. Canada also collects exit information in the land mode. Canada receives biographic entry information from the United States (U.S.) on all travellers who enter the U.S. through a land border crossing, thereby enabling the creation of a Canadian exit record.

Regulatory amendments for the air mode are expected to come into force in Summer 2020. Once fully implemented in the air mode, Canada will collect basic exit information directly from air carriers through passenger manifests. Exit information collected in the air mode will not be shared with the U.S.

The collection of exit information enhances the CBSA’s ability to manage border security by closing the loop on an individual’s travel history. This allows the CBSA to focus efforts and resources towards unknown or higher risk travellers.

This still isn’t fully implemented, and won’t be until at least 2020. That’s right, these changes were announced in 2016, and over three years later, are not fully implemented. Guess the potential fraud and security risks aren’t that great.

Right now, departures by air are not recorded by CBSA. Unless someone is travelling to the United States, (and even then not always) he/she is flying in a plane. Boating isn’t really a practical solution for international travel to and from Canada.

5. CBSA Cancels Old Arrest Warrants

Currently, there are more than 48,000 active arrest warrants in Canada for people wanted on immigration violations. According to the Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA), the “vast majority” of these cases involve people wanted for deportation.
But these figures may not tell the whole story.

Global News has learned the CBSA cancels arrest warrants for failed refugee claimants and other people wanted for removal who it cannot find, even in cases where it is not clear whether a person has left Canada.

What’s more, the CBSA does not track how many warrants it cancels in cases where a person’s whereabouts are unknown.
.
Because the CBSA only recently started tracking people when they exit the country by land — and still doesn’t track people who leave by air — there’s no way for the government or CBSA to say for sure how many people have overstayed their welcome.

Back in the early 2000s, when he worked at the agency that would later become the CBSA, Sundberg says he was assigned to a team in Lethbridge, Alta., tasked with “culling” old warrants for people facing deportation whose cases had been in the system for at least five years.

The protocol for cancelling a warrant, Sundberg said, involved calling known associates of the wanted person, doing internet searches and checking criminal and entry records in other countries to see if someone wanted for arrest had left Canada voluntarily.

The Canada Border Services Agency apparently cancels warrants for people wanted for immigration violations, if the warrants are old.

Moreover, there appears to be no tracking of how many warrants get cancelled either. Just a hunch, but it probably looks bad in the CBSA’s eyes if they have a lot of outstanding warrants. Makes them look slow and unproductive. Alternatively, this could be a deliberate attempt to make sure that people in the country illegally and/or committing other crimes won’t be deported.

6. Scale Of Illegal Aliens Unknown

The Toronto Star reported in 2008 that 41,000 illegals in Canada had been lost track of.

The Toronto Sun reported in 2017 that there somewhere between 200,000 to 500,000 illegal workers in Canada. Not illegals altogether, just illegals working.

Although the focus of this article is not on illegals, or people overstaying their visas, there is an important point to be made here: we don’t really have a clue how many people do stay.

7. Amnesty Program Started July 2019

Ottawa, July 5, 2019 – Canada has launched a new temporary initiative to create a pathway to permanent residency for up to 500 out-of-status workers in the construction industry in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). These construction workers have come to Canada and made contributions to its economy and currently have limited means to regularize their status.

Over many years, even decades, some workers who have come to Canada with valid temporary resident status, and who have filled labour shortages in the construction industry, have fallen out of status. Previous changes, such as “four in, four out”, have resulted in some workers losing their status. These workers have continued to address significant labour shortages in the construction industry, while also contributing to the economy and their communities. Without valid immigration status, these workers and their families have lived in fear and been left feeling very vulnerable. The presence of out-of-status workers in a significant industry leads to depressed wages for Canadians and makes workers vulnerable to employer exploitation and abuse.

The Canadian Government announced in July 2019 a pilot program to give 500 illegals (and their families) a pathway to permanent residence in Canada if they were to work in construction. Yes, we are talking about an actual amnesty program that will lead to PR, and eventual citizenship.

The Canadian Labour Congress supports this initiative. Why wouldn’t they? It will result in an inflation of workers, and allow employers to push down wages. It really is about more cheap labour.

This program is stated to target 500 people (and their immediate family members). But we should not be naïve. Once this is launched, the next question will be how to upscale it.

8. Government Making Illegal Entries Easier

This article isn’t really about illegal entry into Canada (see the Federal Court cases for more). Nonetheless, a major act of hypocrisy must be pointed out.

The Federal Government makes the absurd statements that the Canada/U.S. Safe Third Country Agreement is necessary to protect Canadian borders, but also claims that citizens have no standing to make a claim to close the loophole.

Yes, the agreement must be enforced at all border crossings, but if someone were to GO AROUND those checkpoints, then it is direct entry into Canada.

To summarize where we are right now in the article:
(a) About 25% of students/temps become permanent residents, and
(b) Canada doesn’t track people exiting the country
(c) CBSA cancels old arrest warrants
(d) Number of illegals in Canada is unknown
(e) Amnesty for illegals is starting up
(f) The Canadian Government wants to keep S3CA loophole open

Now that we have covered how the Canadian borders are at best dysfunctional, let’s take a dive into the research into just how many people are staying in Canada (legally). At least this will be considerably more definitive

9. Annual Reports To Parliament

Unlike permanent residents, temporary residents are in Canada for a limited time. This group consists of students, foreign workers and visitors, including tourists. Temporary residents contribute to Canada’s economic growth and to the vitality of our educational institutions.

Before coming to Canada, applicants must obtain a temporary resident visa, unless they are coming from a country that is exempt under the IRP Regulations. Visa officers consider a number of factors when evaluating temporary residents’ visa applications. For example, they can verify whether the visitor is in good health, has a criminal record, is a security threat to Canada, holds a valid passport or travel document, has enough money to live on while in Canada, and will leave voluntarily at the end of his or her stay in Canada. The visa officer evaluates the situation before deciding whether the applicant is a genuine visitor or if he or she might stay in Canada illegally. To that end, the visa officer studies the applicant’s reason for the visit, his or her employment, family situation, and the general economic and political stability of his or her country of origin.

(Page 22 of 2004 Report to Parliament)

Foreign Students
In recognition of the social and economic benefits that foreign students bring to Canada, the federal government has committed to making our country a destination of choice for talented foreign students. To obtain a study permit, candidates must submit an application to study in Canada. Applications must be submitted to and approved by a visa office outside Canada. The permit indicates the level of study and the intended duration of the visit. In general, foreign students must present an acceptance letter from the institution they want to attend, prove that they have sufficient money to pay their tuition fees and living expenses, satisfy the visa officer that they intend to return to their country of origin at the end of their studies and undergo a medical examination.

(Page 23 of 2004 Report to Parliament)

Worth noting that for “temporary” workers and students, the reports emphasize that these are to be temporary, and that the resident is expected to return to the home country afterwards. Remaining in Canada is not to be the goal.

One other point is that the 2004 report makes no mention of any temporary worker or student/graduate transitioning to permanent resident.

The 2005 report (page 29) reiterates that these temporary workers and students are expected to leave once their designated time is up. It is also stated that changes were made so student visas would be for the full duration of the program.

Pilot projects initiated in 2003 (in Alberta, New Brunswick and Manitoba) to test these program changes proved to be highly popular with international students, educational stakeholders and provinces. In 2004–2005, CIC signed agreements with Saskatchewan, Nova Scotia, and Newfoundland and Labrador to allow international students to work in Canada for a second year after graduation. An agreement was also reached with Quebec to allow students outside Montréal and Québec City to work off campus.

The 2005 report (page 31) talks about a rule change that allows some graduate to work in Canada for 2 years now after graduation. I’m confused. I thought the point was that these students were to return home after graduation, not work in Canada afterwards.

On April 18, 2005, the Minister announced initiatives to address some key issues facing international students. These included the expansion of the pilot projects mentioned previously that aim to better attract, integrate and retain international students in regions of the country in partnership with the provinces and educational institutions. The first pilot project will allow international students at public post-secondary institutions to work off campus while completing their studies so that they can experience the Canadian labour market and gain a greater understanding of Canadian society. The second pilot project will allow students to work in Canada for two years after their graduation, rather than one year. To help spread the benefits of immigration to more of Canada’s regions, this second initiative will apply outside Toronto, Montréal and Vancouver. The Government of Canada is investing $10 million a year for five years to support these new initiatives.

These students are supposed to be in Canada “temporarily”, but the Government makes rule changes so they can work in Canada afterwards. Almost like they can become permanent residents.

The limit on the number of provincial nominations was removed to give Saskatchewan greater flexibility in operating its immigration program.

The 2006 report (page 10) explains how Saskatchewan took off the cap of its Provincial Nominee Program.

CIC also launched a national initiative in April 2006 that allows foreign students enrolled full-time in post-secondary programs to seek employment off-campus.

The 2006 report (page 11) states that students enrolled full time in college or university programs are now allowed to work off campus.

Foreign Students
Foreign students bring with them new ideas and cultures that enrich the learning environment within Canadian educational institutions. Foreign students who enter Canada on temporary visas may also be an important source of future immigrants in the skilled worker category since they are well prepared for the Canadian labour market.

The 2006 report (page 23) states that students can be a valuable source of future immigrants. But I thought these “temporary” residents were going home after graduation.

Working with Human Resources and Social Development Canada (HRSDC), Service Canada, and the provinces and territories, we implemented a series of administrative improvements to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program. As announced in Budget 2007, we are developing ways to make it easier, faster and less costly for employers to access the workers that they need, while also introducing measures to ensure that employers comply with program terms and conditions. We are also developing the Canadian Experience Class, a new avenue to immigration that will, under certain conditions, permit foreign students with Canadian credentials and work experience, as well as skilled temporary foreign workers who are already in Canada, to apply for permanent residence.

The 2007 report (page 4) states 2 things.
First: new measures will be enacted to bring in cheap, foreign labour even faster and more cheaply.
Second: we’ll make temporary workers and students eligible for permanent residence.

As well, the Plan includes the introduction of the Canadian Experience Class, a new avenue to immigration that will permit, under certain conditions, temporary workers and foreign students with a Canadian credential to apply for permanent residence.

The 2007 report (page 9) reiterates the plan to make students and temporary workers eligible for permanent residence.

First-ever framework agreements were signed with Alberta on May 4, 2007, and with Nova Scotia on September 19, 2007. To meet the growing demand for labour, the limit on the number of immigrants that can be nominated through the PNP was removed, and the intention to develop annexes to facilitate the entry of temporary foreign workers was announced. In addition, a renewed PNP agreement with Newfoundland and Labrador, which came into force in November 2006, removed the limit on the number of provincial nominees.

The 2007 report (page 10) tells how Nova Scotia and Newfoundland and Labrador had their Provincial Nominee Program caps removed. Saskatchewan did so the year earlier.

Other initiatives in 2006 included policy and planning work to develop options for facilitating the transition from temporary to permanent status. This culminated in the announcement in Budget 2007 of a proposed new avenue to immigration by permitting, under certain conditions, foreign students with Canadian credentials and skilled work experience, and skilled temporary foreign workers who are already in Canada to apply for permanent residence. This will allow qualified individuals with Canadian skilled work experience, or with a combination of Canadian work and studies, to make the transition to permanent status. The program is expected to lead to improved economic outcomes for newcomers in this class.

The 2007 report (page 13) repeats the intention to make students and temporary workers eligible for permanent residence. It’s a common misperception that they will be going home afterwards.

We introduced the Canadian Experience Class, which offers qualifying temporary foreign workers and international students with Canadian work experience the possibility to stay in Canada permanently. This program will make our immigration system more responsive to Canada’s labour market by helping retain those temporary foreign workers and international students who have demonstrated their ability to succeed in Canada.

The 2008 report (page 5) repeats the pledge from the last report to make it easier for temporary foreign workers and students to transition into permanent residents.

As well, the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program was significantly improved by extending work permits from one to up to two years for international students who have graduated from public post-secondary institutions and certain private institutions located in regions outside of Montréal, Toronto and Vancouver. The aim is to help spread the benefits of immigration to more of Canada’s regions. During 2006–2007, a total of 1,388 students received two-year work permits. More broadly, the total number of students who received post-graduation work permits increased from 7,354 in 2005–2006 to 9,121 in 2006–2007. In 2007–2008, the number of post-graduation work permits issued increased to 10,933.

The 2008 report (page 28) talks of expanding the Post Graduate Work Permit Program from 1 year to 2, and of issuing more permits altogether. The goal is to “spread the benefits of immigration” as they call it.

There are many other passages in these reports obviously, that support the claim that “temporary” workers and students aren’t really temporary. However, the point has been made, so let’s move on to how many temps and students are transitioning to permanent residents. In these first 5 reports, there is no mention of any of it.

10. Transitioning To Permanent Residents

Intake of: (a) TFWP; (b) Int’l Mobility; (c) Students from 2015 to 2017

Transitions from Temporary Foreign Worker or International Student Status to Permanent Residence (from 2018 report, covering 2015 to 2017)

Not only are the numbers of students and “temporary” workers increasing, but they are obtaining permanent resident status in higher numbers.

The Provincial Nominee Program, which grants permanent residence, is a very common choice among post secondary school graduates.

Now, all of the above data comes from the 2018 Annual Report to Parliament on Immigration, and covers the years 2015 through 2017. But what about the longer term implications? In the big picture, how many students and temps are getting PR?

11. StatsCan Research On Transitioning Rates

Transition to permanent resident status
International students likely come to Canada for various reasons. Some may intend to return to their home country once they have acquired their Canadian qualifications, while others may intend to remain in Canada for a period of time to obtain work experience in an advanced economy. Still others may hope to become landed immigrants and remain in Canada permanently.

It is possible to estimate the proportion of international students who become permanent residents by calculating a cumulative transition rate. The cumulative rate, which can be calculated for any cohort, is the share of international students who become landed immigrants a number of years after obtaining their first study permit.

For example, among international students who obtained their first study permit between 1995 and 1999, about 15% became permanent residents in the five years that followed. When the period of observation is extended to the first 10 years after the study permit was received, that proportion rises to 20%, and then to 22% by the fifteenth year (Chart 1).

Of the international students in the early 1990s (1990 to 1994), late 1990s (1995 to 1999) and early 2000s (2000 to 2004) cohorts, those in the early 1990s cohort were the most likely to subsequently become permanent residents in Canada. Over the 10 years after they received their first student permit, 27% of the early 1990s cohort became permanent residents, while this was the case for 20% and 25% of individuals in the late 1990s and early 2000s cohorts, respectively. The transition rates of international students in the late 2000s cohorts looked like those of the early 2000s cohorts over the first 5 years after receiving a study permit, but additional data must be accumulated to see whether this trajectory continues over the longer term.

In addition to varying across cohorts, rates of transition into permanent residence also vary across sociodemographic characteristics such as sex, age, level of study and source country. Again, transition rates by characteristic are examined at the tenth year after the first study permit is received (Table 2).

India and China are the top 2 source nations for student visas to Canada. This should be obvious to anyone who visits a college or university.

The research conducted by Yuqian Lu and Feng Hou is too lengthy to go over entirely here, but it is very interesting. Long term, is suggests that roughly a quart of international students will eventually become permanent residents of Canada.

An interesting fact noted: 49% of people who obtained a post-graduate degree (a Master’s) obtained PR status. It has to do with the added points in the immigrtion system.

12. When Exactly Did This Start?

But wait a minute. The above research by Yuqian Lu and Feng Hou cover international students that have transitioned to permanent residents since 1990. However, the Annual Reports to Parliament on Immigration spoke of this new option in 2006/2007. (See below)

That is a screenshot from the 2007 report. It refers to this transition to permanent residence as something to happen in the future.

The transitions to PR have been happening under the Provincial Nominee Programs primarily. The announcement in the annual reports must have just been to boost the numbers, by adding other categories.

13. Transition Rates Increasing For Temps

The 2005-2009 cohort, is the most recent one available from this StatsCan research, and could easily hit 25-30%, if the same pattern is demonstrated. This graphing attempts to demonstrate collect trends of transitioning to permanent residence after a given time.

Bear in mind, that new programs are available can boost this and future cohorts higher.

14. Most “Temp” Workers Had Current Status

Another StatsCan research piece documents the status of so-called “temporary” workers who held visas at or before the time that they transitioned to permanent residence.

It is broken into two periods: 1990 to 1999, and 2000 to 2009. Although it does not give the totals, as a percentage, around 87% of people who transitioned to permanent residence had current status.

Although the International Mobility Program existed well before the 2013 TFW scandal, participants were still able to become PR.

15. Students/Temps: 25-30% Will Get PR

Based on the information provided by StatsCan, it is safe to say that 25-30% of students and temporary workers will eventually get their Permanent Resident status. Transitions do start out at a fast rate, and understandably peter out. This is based on research done by some StatsCan researchers.

Now, a few caveats must be talked about here to make the picture more complete. This is not the end of the story.

First, rule changes by successive Federal Governments have expanded the number of programs, and eased the restrictions and numbers available. It stands to reason that rates will increase from what has been shown before. The information given about previous years may be obsolete.

Second, this information does not take into account people who have remained in the country but not transitioned to Permanent Resident status. While the common belief is that students will return home after their schooling is done, or workers will return home after their work term ends, that is simply not the case. Even StatsCan admits that people from lower GDP countries are more likely to stay given the higher standard of living in Canada.

Third, these findings do not consider people now living illegally in Canada. Inexplicably, we still have no real exit tracking system. As such, the Federal Government, or at least the Immigration Ministry, doesn’t know who is leaving Canada and when.

Fourth, this is all predicated on the assumption that the Government puts out truthful and accurate findings. This type of “backdoor immigration” system is not popular with the public, so minimizing the scale of it isn’t much of a stretch.

In short, 25-30% of temporary workers and students (officially) will stay in Canada. But take that conclusion with a grain of salt. It may be much, much higher.

IMM #15: Canadian Student Visas — Pathway to PR For Families

(Student visas are pathway to permanent residence in Canada)

(Work in Canada after graduation)

(Spouse/Common-Law Partner also eligible to work)

(Children of students eligible to enroll in school)

(Canada and recognition of foreign credentials)

(StatsCan looks at over-education)

(Screenshot from 2018 Report to Parliament)

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

CLICK HERE, for #1: temp workers, other migration categories.
CLICK HERE, for #2: close to 1M people/year entering on visas.
CLICK HERE, for #3: CANZUK, expansion and erasing the borders.
CLICK HERE, for #4: population replacement programs in Canada.
CLICK HERE, for #5: replacement numbers/countries since 2004.
CLICK HERE, for #6: domestic abuse as pathway to PR status.
CLICK HERE, for #7: the International Mobility Program.
CLICK HERE, for #8: economic imm, remittances, brain drain.
CLICK HERE, for #9: global remittance estimates, regulations.
CLICK HERE, for #10: economic immigration when unemployment high.
CLICK HERE, for #11: TD article on true migration rates.
CLICK HERE, for #12: pilot amnesty-for-illegals program in Toronto.
CLICK HERE, for #13: work permits, health care for illegals.
CLICK HERE, for #14: getting legal residence via fraud.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

2. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for stay in Canada after graduation.
http://archive.is/Tf68L
CLICK HERE, for post graduation work permit.
http://archive.is/Tw4J1
CLICK HERE, for work permits for spouse/common-law partner.
http://archive.is/jUk5I
CLICK HERE, for working while school is in session.
http://archive.is/4HCNi
CLICK HERE, for children studying in Canada, including options without any visa.
http://archive.is/SCTwX
CLICK HERE, for foreign credential recognition in Canada.
http://archive.is/q7tio
CLICK HERE, for auditing the F.C.R.P.
http://archive.is/tvwn8
CLICK HERE, for a Statistics Canada paper on over-education and life happiness data in Canada.
http://archive.is/WzyTV

CLICK HERE, for Canada: amnesty for illegals pilot program in GTA.
CLICK HERE, for sanctuary cities circumventing borders.
CLICK HERE, for 22M+ illegals in U.S., amnesty programs.

3. Annual Immigration Reports To Parliament

(a) 2004 Annual Report to Parliament
(b) 2005 Annual Report to Parliament
(c) 2006 Annual Report to Parliament
(d) 2007 Annual Report to Parliament
(e) 2008 Annual Report to Parliament
(f) 2009 Annual Report to Parliament
(g) 2010 Annual Report to Parliament
(h) 2011 Annual Report to Parliament
(i) 2012 Annual Report to Parliament
(j) 2013 Annual Report to Parliament
(k) 2014 Annual Report to Parliament
(l) 2015 Annual Report to Parliament
(m) 2016 Annual Report to Parliament
(n) 2017 Annual Report to Parliament
(o) 2018 Annual Report to Parliament
(p) Archived listings of Reports

Report Year Actual Year Numbers
2004 2003 61,293
2005 2004 56,536
2006 2005 57,476
2007 2006 61,703
2008 2007 64,636
2009 2008 79,509
2010 2009 85,140
2011 2010 96,157
2012 2011 98,383
2013 2012 104,810
2014 2013 111,865
2015 2014 127,698
2016 2015 219,143
2017 2016 265,111
2018 2017 317,328

4. Context For This Article

In our official Annual Reports to Parliament on Immigration, student visas are classified as “temporary” migration into Canada. However, this is extremely misleading for at least 3 reasons:

First: There are pathways to stay in Canada after graduation, and to obtain permanent residence. These are not loopholes, but options deliberately built in.

Second: Students can work up to 20 hours per week when school is in session, and an unlimited amount of time in other weeks. These are in fact WORK permits as well, and it forces Canadians to compete against students for other jobs.

Third: There are options to bring family members along, which the public at large doesn’t know. Spouses, for example, can obtain work permits simply for being married to a student visa holder. Also, children of student visa holders get access to primary and secondary schooling in Canada — even without a visa. This counts for the children as “time in Canada”, and towards credit for extending the stay further.

5. Work Permits For Spose Of Student

Who can get a work permit as the spouse or common-law partner of a student?
Your spouse or common-law partner may be eligible for an open work permit if you:
-have a valid study permit and
-are a full-time student at one of these types of schools:
-a public post-secondary school, such as a college or university, or CEGEP in Quebec
-a private college-level school in Quebec
-a Canadian private school that can legally award degrees under provincial law (for example, Bachelors, Masters or Doctorate degree)

The student visa program is designed to provide open work permits for the spouse or Common-Law Partner of a student visa holder to work freely for any employer while the other is in school. Of course, this counts towards the time needed to be in Canada to transition into other statuses, say permanent resident.

6. Student’s Children Can Study, No Visa

Minor children before entering Canada
Minor children who want to study for six months or more must apply for a study permit before they enter Canada. This includes minor children who come with parents who had a study or work permit approved overseas.
You do not need a study permit for a program of six months or less, but you may still apply for one before entering Canada.
If you are coming to Canada with parents who have a valid study or work permit, you don’t need to provide a letter of acceptance from a school when you apply for a study permit.

Minor children already in Canada
Minors already in Canada should apply for a study permit. In some provinces or territories, they may need one to receive social services.
Minor children who are already in Canada may study without a study permit if they:
-are in kindergarten, no matter what their parents’ status is in Canada
-want to go to pre-school, primary or secondary school and have a parent who is allowed to work or study in Canada
-are refugees or refugee claimants
-have parents who are refugees or refugee claimants
-came to Canada as a visitor for a course or program of studies of six months or less
-will study in a course or program of six months or less
-are in Canada by themselves

This may be poor wording from the site, but why would the children already be in the country if the parents are not? Is the incentive here to enter Canada with the children and only then get them into school?

Nonetheless, if the children of a student are in Canada, they are eligible to be enrolled — for free — in primary or secondary school in Canada.

7. Work While In School

How many hours can you work off-campus?
-You can only start working in Canada when you start your study program. You can’t work before your studies begin.
During regular school semesters:
-you can work up to 20 hours
During scheduled breaks in your school year, like during winter and summer holidays:
-you can work full-time
-you can’t work during a break that comes before you start your very first school semester
-If your program doesn’t have scheduled academic breaks, you can’t work more than 20 hours per week.

While school is going on, a student visa holder can work up to 20 hours/week, for any employer. One caveat, you cannot work for multiple employers if the combined total is over 20 hours/week. At other times, there is no limit to the number of hours available.

And again, Canadians are forced to compete against what is essentially a pool of temporary work visas.

8. Post Graduate Work Permit

If your program was more than 8 months but less than 2 years
We may give you a PGWP that’s valid for up to the same length as your study program.
For example, if you completed a 9-month program, we may give you a work permit for up to 9 months.

If your program was 2 years or more
We may give you a PGWP that’s valid for 3 years.

If you completed more than 1 program
You may be able to get a PGWP that combines the length of each program.
Each of the programs you completed must be
-PGWP-eligible and
-at least 8 months in length
You can’t get a PGWP if you already had one after completing an earlier program of study.

In reality, most graduates are getting a work permit after finishing school through the Post Graduate Work Program. It may be up to 3 years, sometimes longer. Why? What is the goal?

The final objective for many is clear. Permanent residence, and then citizenship. Student visas (while “temporary” on paper, are in fact stepping stones to remaining in Canada.

9. Transition Into Permanent Residents

Find your path to permanent residence
You’ve studied in Canada and maybe you even have Canadian work experience. Now, you’d like to live here permanently. We have options for you to become a permanent resident!
The Come to Canada tool can help you explore your options. You can also use the cheat sheet below to compare programs. Visit the program’s eligibility page to get all the details.

This page is too long to quote, but do go through it. Point is, that “temporary” visas like student visas are in fact stepping stones (pathways) to becoming a permanent resident.

As for your spouse and children (if any) in Parts #4 and #5, guess what? That time spent in Canada will also count towards the necessary time in Canada. And if the original student visa holder becomes a permanent resident, it will be easier to sponsor them as well.

10. How Many Students Are We Admitting?

Check the data table in Part #2. All of that comes directly from the Annual Reports to Parliament in Canada. Clearly, the numbers have been trending upwards for many years, and there is no sign of that slowing down. It has gone even higher since, with total college and university enrollment consisting of about 40% international students.

Why the surge? 3 reasons. First, colleges and universities are money pits, and require an almost endless supply of money to keep going. God forbid they downsize. Second, Canadians are more and more opting opt of the post secondary life, given high debt and poor job prospects. That shortfall has to be made up elsewhere, or else cuts will need to be made. Third, as outlined before, student visas are a direct pathway to permanent residence, something more and more people are taking advantage of.

Also, keep in mind that children of students are allowed to come to primary and secondary school without a student visa in many cases. Although the majority of student visa holders are childless, this does skew the data.

The result is that Canada is importing a replacement population under the guise of higher education. Citizenship for tuition dollars, that’s what it comes down to.

11. Overeducation, Poor Job Prospects

Over-education is typically defined as employment in an occupation that is below an individual’s skills or work experience (Chen, Smith and Mustard 2010). Subjective measures based on respondents’ self-perceived over-education are also used in the literature (Feldman and Turnley 1995). Although there are multiple operational definitions (Friedland and Price 2003), the most commonly used measure identifies the occurrence of over-education as when an individual’s educational attainment is higher than the level of education “required to adequately perform” his or her job (Rubb 2003; Wolbers 2003, p. 250). This study also employs this definition of over-education, focusing specifically on the match between an individual’s educational attainment and the educational requirements of the occupation.

Generally, individuals who are over-educated are not able to obtain employment that fully capitalizes on their level of education, in terms of either financial rewards or skill utilization (Bracke, van de Straat and Missinne 2014; Feldman 1996). The consequences of over-education have been examined extensively. Much of the literature focuses on either the economic costs of over-education or how over-education affects job quality. These studies indicate that over-education results in lower earnings, lower productivity, more precarious working conditions, less autonomy on the job, and unused human capital (e.g., Chiswick and Miller 2009; Fleming and Kler 2008; Hartog 2000; Nordin, Persson and Rooth 2010; Peter, Gässler and Geyer 2007; Piper 2015; Smith and Frank 2005; Wu, Luksyte and Parker 2015). However, there are also psychological costs that may be linked, at least in part, to these consequences of over-education.

One limitation of these studies is that they are concentrated on recent immigrants, who tend to experience a range of challenges when transitioning into a new culture and labour market. While some hypothesize that a continued mismatch between immigrants’ education and employment likely increases their feelings of dissatisfaction (Chen, Smith and Mustard 2010), there is no evidence that this is the case. In fact, George et al. (2012) found that immigrant engineers who were not employed in their field and had been living in Canada for six or more years had higher life satisfaction than their more recently arrived counterparts.

That study is a very interesting one, and those are just a few quotes from it.

However, researchers omit a very real piece of information from the equation. Depending on where a person comes from, merely moving to Canada would be seen as a victory with the much higher standard of living. One could reasonably believe that immigrating itself was the real goal, with occupational achievement a very distant second. That is missing from the report though.

This is not to say that there is anything inherently bad with moving to another country. But we should be honest about what is really driving these changes. It is overall quality of life.

As anyone who has been paying attention over the last decade knows, the market is extremely glutted for new graduates. Why then would people come all the way over here to compete with Canadians? Answer: immigrating itself is the real goal. Many don’t care what field they end up in.

The CBC article is just one example of media making it abundantly clear that job prospects for young people and new graduates is very harsh. Importing large numbers of students who intend to remain in Canada only makes their difficulties worse.

12. Foreign Credential Recognition Prog

1. Overview
The Government of Canada provides funding to governments and organizations through the Foreign Credential Recognition Program (FCRP) to support foreign credential recognition in Canada.

The Framework sets out a commitment to provide internationally trained individuals in target occupations with timely credential recognition service. This means these individuals will know within one year whether their qualifications, including their credentials, meet Canadian requirements, what other requirements they may need and which other occupations match their skills and experience. Governments are putting supports and processes in place to meet this service standard.

This service commitment is already being met in these target occupations:

  • architect
  • dentist
  • engineering technician
  • engineer
  • financial auditor and accountant
  • licensed practical nurse
  • medical laboratory technologist
  • medical radiation technologist
  • occupational therapist
  • pharmacist
  • physiotherapist
  • registered nurse
  • physician
  • teacher (K–12)

This service commitment will soon be met in these target occupations:

  • audiologist and speech language pathologist
  • carpenter
  • electrician (industrial and construction)
  • geoscientist
  • heavy duty equipment technician
  • heavy equipment operator
  • lawyer
  • midwife
  • psychologist
  • welder

Any of these fields look familiar? They are ones that Canadian graduates struggle to find work in. This is because the markets are already saturated.

Note also: true, these programs exist in Canadian schools, but the places available are very limited. This means that there ARE Canadians who want to get into these fields, but that only limited spaces exist.

The Canadian Government (really the taxpayers) help to fund this Foreign Credential Recognition Program. This means that taxpayers are financing efforts to bring more foreign workers in, while our own people struggle to find meaningful work.

One obvious benefit to this high supply of labour: it helps to keep wages low. The supply — in many fields — far outweighs the demands.

Of course, there is another angle to look at: The FCRP staff can claim that the foreign credentials don’t quite meet the standard, and that more schooling is needed. Hence, the workers will be forced to help finance the post-secondary education beast.

13. Auditing The F.C.R.P.

The audit findings indicate a high level of compliance with respect to educational and professional qualification requirements. The audit confirmed that all credentials claimed by appointees in 269 appointments were valid and issued by legitimate institutions. However, there were 9 appointments (out of the total sample of 278 appointments) where the audit team did not have enough information to complete validation, for reasons outlined in this report.

While the authenticity of the credentials claimed by appointees was largely confirmed, the audit did reveal a lack of understanding of the requirement for appointees to provide proof of Canadian equivalency for foreign credentials. Qualification standards, established by the Treasury Board of Canada, stipulate that candidates with foreign credentials must have those credentials assessed against Canadian educational standards and found to be comparable. Sub-delegated managers did not follow through on this requirement in 12 of the 24 appointments (50%) where it applied. This observation leads to the single recommendation stemming from the audit.

For the auditing done in 2019, 278 appointments were audited for documentation, and 24 were audited for equivalency to Canadian education.

These are very small audit numbers, given the size and scale of the program. But half (50%) were not equivalent enough to Canadian standards.

As for the missing documentation, is it that paperwork has gone missing, or was there fraud? Would be interesting to know.

14. Where Do Things Stand?

Let’s consider the facts:

(a) Canada is admitting a huge population of foreign students, which now make up almost half of college and university students. Schools need these foreign students to make up the difference as domestic enrollment is decreasing. The numbers for international students have been consistently trending upwards.

(b) Students can work, even while in school. This leads to an artificial bump in the amount of workers available, and helps to hamstring Canadians who are looking for work, or for more hours. They have new competition to face.

(c) These students, once they graduate, will have pathways to obtain permanent resident status. This also applies to a spouse or children, who are able to come to Canada as well. This is not “temporary” migration as people claim, and absolutely should be disclosed publicly.

(d) Many professions are completely glutted with graduates and other young people. This has led to an underemployment epidemic Canada, where people are getting little to no use out of their education. As such, it become an employer’s market in many fields, and it allows wages to remain stagnant, even as inflation continues.

(e) Our own government uses taxpayer money to finance the recognition of foreign credentials. This happens even as Canadian programs are capped and enrollment limited. This means that the rules are intentionally rigged to favour foreigners.

How does any of this help Canadians? How does importing subsidized foreign competition, while capping domestic enrollment make job hunting easier for Canadians? It doesn’t. All it does it help ensure a large supply of labour available to work for less.

To be fair, it does also help replace the population. But that has been addressed elsewhere.

IMM #12: Toronto Opens Path To PR For Illegals & Their Families

(Program launched in July: PR-Path for illegals)

(Canadian Labour Congress)

(Canadian Border Services cancelling arrest warrants)

(Nothing new here. Temps becoming permanent residents is old news, and there are many ways to do this.

(Screenshots from 2018 Report to Parliament)

(How the CPC might address this issue)

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

CLICK HERE, for #1: temp workers, other migration categories.
CLICK HERE, for #2: close to 1M people/year entering on visas.
CLICK HERE, for #3: CANZUK, expansion and erasing the borders.
CLICK HERE, for #4: population replacement programs in Canada.
CLICK HERE, for #5: replacement numbers/countries since 2004.
CLICK HERE, for #6: domestic abuse as pathway to PR status.
CLICK HERE, for #7: the International Mobility Program.
CLICK HERE, for #8: economic imm, remittances, brain drain.
CLICK HERE, for #9: global remittance estimates, regulations.
CLICK HERE, for #10: economic immigration when unemployment high.
CLICK HERE, for #11: TD article on true migration rates.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

2. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for Canadian Gov’t website on pathway to permanent resident status for illegal aliens.
http://archive.is/e6OYZ
CLICK HERE, for the Canadian Labour Congress.
http://archive.is/s3pq6

CLICK HERE, for sanctuary cities circumventing borders.
CLICK HERE, for 22M+ illegals in U.S., amnesty programs.

3. Annual Immigration Reports To Parliament

(a) 2004 Annual Report to Parliament
(b) 2005 Annual Report to Parliament
(c) 2006 Annual Report to Parliament
(d) 2007 Annual Report to Parliament
(e) 2008 Annual Report to Parliament
(f) 2009 Annual Report to Parliament
(g) 2010 Annual Report to Parliament
(h) 2011 Annual Report to Parliament
(i) 2012 Annual Report to Parliament
(j) 2013 Annual Report to Parliament
(k) 2014 Annual Report to Parliament
(l) 2015 Annual Report to Parliament
(m) 2016 Annual Report to Parliament
(n) 2017 Annual Report to Parliament
(o) 2018 Annual Report to Parliament
(p) Archived listings of Reports

Each annual report talks about how many “temporary” workers and students come into Canada every year. But how many of them actually leave, and how many simply stay, legally or otherwise?

4. Some Context For This Review

Defenders of mass migration into Canada always defend so-called “temporary” entry into the country. These programs include:
(a) Temporary Foreign Worker Program
(b) International Mobility Program
(c) Student Visas

The main difference (on paper) between TFWP and IMP is that TFWP requires a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), which is a demonstration that a job exists that a Canadian cannot fulfill. By contrast, the International Mobility Program is effectively an open work permit.

While student visas are supposed to be for school, students are allowed to work up to 20 hours per week when class is in session. They are allowed unlimited hours other periods. Student visas are essentially work permits as well.

Despite what critics claim, not everyone returns home after their allotted time in Canada. Some do, certainly, but a lot don’t. Why? Because Canada’s laws make it very easy to obtain permanent residence, or to otherwise extend your stay. And not only can the main applicant stay, but family (typically spouse and children) are often included in this.

Certainly there are other programs than the 3 listed above, but they are 3 of the largest, and important to note.

5. Pathway To Permanent Residence

Ottawa, July 5, 2019 – Canada has launched a new temporary initiative to create a pathway to permanent residency for up to 500 out-of-status workers in the construction industry in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA). These construction workers have come to Canada and made contributions to its economy and currently have limited means to regularize their status.

And if this “temporary” initiative is deemed to be successful, then how much will it be extended by? Guaranteed it is not 500 people.

Over many years, even decades, some workers who have come to Canada with valid temporary resident status, and who have filled labour shortages in the construction industry, have fallen out of status. Previous changes, such as “four in, four out”, have resulted in some workers losing their status. These workers have continued to address significant labour shortages in the construction industry, while also contributing to the economy and their communities. Without valid immigration status, these workers and their families have lived in fear and been left feeling very vulnerable. The presence of out-of-status workers in a significant industry leads to depressed wages for Canadians and makes workers vulnerable to employer exploitation and abuse.

Over many years and decades? So the government admits that people have been overstaying visas or work permits for decades. Why hasn’t this been addressed long ago.

Illegals living in Canada leads to depressed wages? I would actually agree, but up to a point. Yes, the extra labour available does drive down wages. However, that would still be the case even if they were “legalized”. It would still be an abundance of cheap labour.

The Temporary Public Policy for Out-of-Status Construction Workers in the Greater Toronto Area responds to the recent parliamentary report on labour shortages in the construction industry in this part of Canada and reflects observations from numerous studies about the vulnerability of out-of-status workers. In the committee’s recommendations, the Government was urged to explore solutions for workers in the construction industry with precarious or no immigration status.

This temporary initiative is a step forward to increase the protection of some of these construction workers and their families, while safeguarding Canada’s labour market and ensuring that Canada can retain the workers it needs to grow the economy and build communities.

Potential applicants will first identify themselves to the Canadian Labour Congress (CLC), a national labour organization with many construction industry affiliates in the GTA. CLC officials will determine the eligibility of potential applicants and refer them to Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada.

Source is here. That is exactly as it sounds. People living in the country illegally can sign up for this program, and if accepted, will be on a pathway to permanent residence.

Not that we don’t have large numbers of Canadians who are either unemployed or underemployed. Never mind that Canadians are forced to compete for jobs with people in the country illegally, who are often willing to work less. Never mind the effect of driving down wages.

Ignore the money that gets sent out of the country as remittances, money that should be staying and helping to drive Canada’s economy.

Does anyone truly believe this is a “temporary” program, or that it is going to remain at just a few hundred people? No, once it’s considered “operational”, the next step will be to scale it up.

6. PR Program For Families

Spouses/partners and dependent children can be included in the application for permanent residence.

This detail cannot be left out. This so-called temporary initiative is not just for the worker without legal status. Spouse and children are also eligible to apply under it.

7. Canadian Labour Congress

The Canadian Labour Congress (CLC) is proud to be working with Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada (IRCC) to implement a temporary initiative that will help 500 out-of-status construction workers find a pathway to permanent residence that will end the insecure nature of their employment and immigration status.

Out-of-status workers are people who have come to Canada with valid temporary residence status, but have fallen out of status for various reasons, and have found employment in the construction industry. Without status, these workers have continued to fill labour shortages, while contributing greatly to our society and economy. However, fear of detection, detainment, and deportation drives these workers and their families “underground,” often limiting their access to social programs, and making them vulnerable to employer exploitation and abuse.

The Canadian Labour Congress openly admits that people are working without being legally allowed in (or to remain) in Canada. But who cares, we need the workers.

The purpose of this initiative is to put in place a mechanism for the Government of Canada and the CLC, in the spirit of co-operation and mutual interest, to work together in the identification and referral for processing of applications for permanent residence in Canada of up to 500 out-of-status construction workers in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and their immediate family members (e.g., spouse or common-law partner, and dependent children).

Up to 100 of the 500 spaces for this public policy will be permitted for those who entered Canada as a temporary resident, but who never had authorization to work in Canada.

For some clarification, it is not 500 people INCLUDING family members. Rather, it is 500 people plus their family members.

Nice bait-and-switch here. The program is announced as a means to help WORKERS who have fallen on hard times. However, the CLC admits it will be partially open for people who were never even workers.

Also, this may be poor wording, but is immediate family limited to a spouse and children, or are those just the guidelines?

8. U.S. A Cautionary Warning

Both sanctuary cities and the estimated 22 million or more illegals have been covered here. The U.S. has had many amnesty initiatives, but since the borders are not secure, this doesn’t help the problem. It only encourages much more of it.

Problem is, since Canada doesn’t track people leaving the country (until very recently), we have no way of knowing who has left, and when.

Informal estimates are of 200,000 to 500,000 people living in the Canada, small compared to 22M or more in the United States. However, getting actual substance behind those estimates is difficult. And if this “pilot program” is considered successful, how large will it be expanded to?

9. CBSA “Cancelling” Arrest Warrants

While a separate topic, this is interesting to consider as well. Recently the Canadian Border Services Agency admitted it “cancels” arrest warrants for people it is supposed to deport, but cannot find. The article is mind-blowingly stupid beyond belief.

According to Lemire, the CBSA cancelled more than 1,300 immigration warrants in 2018. It’s unclear how many of these cancelled warrants were for people who could still be in Canada but were not found by the CBSA.

A cynic might wonder whether this is politically motivated, or whether the Border Services wants to appear less incompetent by having less “open warrants” on its books. Either way, it’s disgraceful, and undermines Canadian sovereignty.

10. Forget Deportation, Just Put Them To Work

That seems to be where we are heading. No more “divisive” deportations. Just put them to work, and hand out their new papers. Don’t worry about any of the long term costs.

As has been covered ad nauseum here, LEGAL immigration into Canada is currently at about 1 million per year. That includes people who have entered on some kind of visa, and have a pathway to permanent residence.

This program will not stop at 500 workers and their families. It will be expanded once the structure is in place. It cheapens Canadian citizenship when access to it is so easy.

True Scale of Illegals in US: 22 Million? More Amnesty Coming?

(Research into scope of illegal immigration into US)

(Simpson-Mazzoli Act of 1986)

(George W. Bush’s “Comprehensive Immigration Reform”)

(From Wikipedia, States are flipping blue)

(Former supporter Ann Coulter sours on Trump’s failure to build the wall)

1. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for a 2018 PLOS study, est. 22.1M illegal aliens in US.
CLICK HERE, for a HILL article on research est. of 22.1M illegals.
CLICK HERE, for RealClearPolitics article on death of U.S. citizenship.
CLICK HERE, for 2019 Pew Research data on illegal aliens.
CLICK HERE, for 2016 Pew Research on methodology.
CLICK HERE, for 1996 to 2017 Department of Homeland Security “yearbook” on entry into the US.
CLICK HERE, for Forbes on health care costs of illegals.
CLICK HERE, for Daily Caller article on education costs.

CLICK HERE, for the Simpson-Mazzoli Act of 1986, amnesty for illegals.
CLICK HERE, for the 7 amnesties passed by U.S. Congress.
CLICK HERE, for George W. Bush’s “Comprehensive Immigration Reform” of 2007. In short, yet another amnesty program.

CLICK HERE, for Ann Coulter, costs of illegal immigration.
CLICK HERE, for MIT/Yale study (2018), estimating 22M illegals.
CLICK HERE, for Bear Stearns (2005) estimates 20M illegals.
CLICK HERE, for Barlett & Steele (2004), estimating 3M cross a year.

2. Context For Canadian Public

Why should Canadians care? After all, this is an American problem.

Selfishness aside, we should care. Illegal immigration is wrong, regardless of where it is happening. And what happens in the U.S. happens here. We share many of the same problems.

It should also make Canadians stop and wonder exactly how many illegal aliens are in Canada. Even beyond illegals, mass LEGAL migration also has the effect of changing the demographics, and altering elections. In fact, the ridings with the most immigration were pretty reliable Liberal voters.

It’s also worth wondering if conservatives in Canada would implement some form of amnesty for illegals already here. Even if the entire Canada/U.S. border is declared a port of entry, it does nothing to deport the illegals already here.

If any sort of amnesty were to be granted, wouldn’t that just provide more incentive to come to Canada or the U.S. by whatever means available?

3. Simpson-Mazzoli Act of 1986 (Reagan Amnesty)

The Immigration Reform and Control Act (IRCA), Pub.L. 99–603, 100 Stat. 3445, enacted November 6, 1986, also known as the Simpson–Mazzoli Act or the Reagan Amnesty, signed into law by Ronald Reagan on November 6, 1986, is an Act of Congress which reformed United States immigration law. The Act
-required employers to attest to their employees’ immigration status;
-made it illegal to hire or recruit illegal immigrants knowingly;
legalized certain seasonal agricultural undocumented immigrants, and;
legalized undocumented immigrants who entered the United States before January 1, 1982 and had resided there continuously with the penalty of a fine, back taxes due, and admission of guilt; candidates were required to prove that they were not guilty of crimes, that they were in the country before January 1, 1982, and that they possessed at least a minimal knowledge about U.S. history, government, and the English language.
At the time, the Immigration and Naturalization Service estimated that about four million illegal immigrants would apply for legal status through the act and that roughly half of them would be eligible.

Ronald Reagan, who identifies as a “conservative” gave amnesty to 3 million illegals (by some estimates).

Worth noting is that Reagan had overwhelming majorities in his 1984 landslide win. He was not pressured into doing this by Democrats.

Look at the above two U.S. maps. This is what replacement migration has done. It is what amnesty for illegals has done. Several U.S. States have “turned blue” permanently.

Ronald Reagan’s amnesty policies turned California blue (and started the trend). Yet conservatives don’t seem to care that he did nothing to conserve the Republican voting base.

4. Amnesty Measures Over The Years

The Seven Amnesties Passed by Congress
1. Immigration and Reform Control Act (IRCA), 1986: A blanket amnesty for some 2.7 million illegal aliens
2. Section 245(i) Amnesty, 1994: A temporary rolling amnesty for 578,000 illegal aliens
3. Section 245(i) Extension Amnesty, 1997: An extension of the rolling amnesty created in 1994
4. Nicaraguan Adjustment and Central American Relief Act (NACARA) Amnesty, 1997: An amnesty for close to one million illegal aliens from Central America
5. Haitian Refugee Immigration Fairness Act Amnesty (HRIFA), 1998: An amnesty for 125,000 illegal aliens from Haiti
6. Late Amnesty, 2000: An amnesty for some illegal aliens who claim they should have been amnestied under the 1986 IRCA amnesty, an estimated 400,000 illegal aliens
7. LIFE Act Amnesty, 2000: A reinstatement of the rolling Section 245(i) amnesty, an estimated 900,000 illegal aliens

Source is here. As you can see, it never stopped at just one amnesty. There was always another group to be considered.

While items 2-7 in fact were signed into law by Bill Clinton (a Democrat), it’s worth pointing out that Reagan, a Republican, was the one who started the trend in 1986. Furthermore, Reagan wouldn’t be the last “conservative” to propose blanket amnesty policies for illegal aliens.

As with Reagan, Clinton seems to have no issue with granting mass amnesties, even while the border is still not secure. This surely means that

5. Bush’s “Comprehensive Immigration Reform”

3. To Secure Our Border, We Must Create A Temporary Worker Program
America’s Immigration Problem Will Not Be Solved With Security Measures Alone. There are many people on the other side of our borders who will do anything to come to America to work and build a better life. This dynamic creates tremendous pressure on our border that walls and patrols alone cannot stop.

As We Tighten Controls At The Border, We Must Also Address The Needs Of America’s Growing Economy. The rule of law cannot permit unlawful employment of millions of undocumented workers in the United States. Many American businesses, however, depend on hiring willing foreign workers for jobs that Americans are not doing.

If you read between the lines, Bush has a solution in mind: many or most of the illegal aliens in the U.S. can be put to work, and made to be productive.

But as long as they have economic value, I suppose. Ignore the demographic changes. Ignore the voting changes that will happen. Ignore the culture clash, and tension. Ignore the slap in the face that it causes to people who come to the U.S. legally.

4. We Must Bring Undocumented Workers Already In The Country Out Of The Shadows
Comprehensive Immigration Reform Must Account For The Millions Of Immigrants Already In The Country Illegally. Illegal immigration causes serious problems, putting pressure on public schools and hospitals and straining State and local budgets. People who have worked hard, supported their families, avoided crime, led responsible lives, and become a part of American life should be called in out of the shadows and under the rule of American law.

The President Opposes An Automatic Path To Citizenship Or Any Other Form Of Amnesty. Amnesty, as a reward for lawbreaking, would only invite further lawbreaking. Amnesty would also be unfair to those lawful immigrants who have patiently waited their turn for citizenship and to those who are still waiting to enter the country legally.

The President Supports A Rational Middle Ground Between A Program Of Mass Deportation And A Program Of Automatic Amnesty. It is neither wise nor realistic to round up and deport millions of illegal immigrants in the United States. But there should be no automatic path to citizenship. The President supports a rational middle ground founded on the following basic tenets:

Some quotes from the White House, on the subject. Despite the explicit denials, this “is” an amnesty program. Stating publicly that there will not be mass deportations means existing laws will not be enforced. Saying you can work for legalization in fact is the reward that people have crossed the border illegally to get in the first place.

It never seems to dawn on successive administrations that rewarding people for breaking the law only encourages more lawbreaking to happen.

Or more likely, they know but don’t care. There seems to be another agenda at play.

Thankfully, this “reform” eventually fell through. However, Bush also seemed to only pay lip service to the idea of real border security. As long as the U.S./Mexico border is porous, people will keep coming illegally. This reality is undeniable.

6. Donald Trump and “Build The Wall”

Donald Trump (narrowly) defeated Hillary Clinton in November 2016 to win the White House. One major campaign was to build a wall across the U.S./Mexico border. This pledge proved extremely popular, as American are tired of continued illegal immigration, and want a secure border.

However, even Trump’s most vocal supporters have had to face the reality that it wasn’t getting done. 2 years into his mandate, with Republican control of both Houses of Congress, nothing had been built. To be fair though, some Republicans were obstructionist.

While some new parts have been added since the 2018 Midterms, and some existing structures replaced, it seems to fall far short of what supporters were expecting.

7. Financial Costs Of Illegal Immigration

There is a lot of conflicting information of the actual costs to the American public. However, here is one statistic. Forbes estimates that the U.S. public subsidizes health care for illegals to the tune of $18.5 billion per year.

Another estimate comes from the Daily Caller, and suggests that it costs about $44 billion per year to educate children illegally in the country.

That doesn’t even include crime data, which can be tricky to find.

8. Voting Trends By Demographics

It foolish to ignore demographic patterns when it comes to voting. Leftist parties push for more immigration at least in part because they believe it will result in more voters. Hence this will result in better election results.

They aren’t wrong. These patterns absolutely do exist. Could be why leftists have little to no interest in securing the borders. Conservatives have little interest either, but that is economically driven.

In this sense, though, it seems to make no real difference if people have immigrated legally, or are illegals given amnesty. The result is still more voters.

In liberal states like New Jersey, illegals are eligible to obtain driver’s licenses. This is despite (by definition) being in the country illegally. And how do we know they aren’t voting illegally?

9. Illegal Immigration Hurts Everyone

Illegal aliens do access social services that they haven’t paid into. This limits resources for citizens who are in the nation illegally, and who have been paying in.

Undermining the borders is an assault on national sovereignty. Rewarding them with a pathway to citizenship only encourages more of it. Americans are sick and tired of politicians who have little to no interest in enforcing border security.

As for the argument that this generates extra tax revenue: How do you pay U.S. taxes without a Social Security Number? How do you get an SSN without legal status? Even if taxes were withheld, they most likely went into the employer’s pocket.

A possible 22 million people in the country illegally. A nice potential voting bloc, if only they could be given amnesty.

Canada, how many do we have?

10. Ann Coulter Estimates Much Higher

Author and political commentator Ann Coulter suggests that even the 22 million figure is lowballed. She gives various estimates, including that it could be 30-60 million all told. She makes 2 very valid points:

(1) Previous estimates based on self-reporting.
(2) Numbers haven’t changed much over the years, despite continued entries.

That will be the subject of a piece all its own.

IMM #10: Economic Immigration Absurd When We Have High Unemployment

(Apply For Permanent Residence: AIPP)

(Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program)

(Jason Kenney laments continued job losses in AB, even as he plans to expand economic immigration)

(Employers who abuse rules in Temporary Foreign Workers Program and International Mobility Program)

(TFW in Brooks, Alberta)

(Unemployment data from Service Canada, September 2019)

(Unemployment in Maritimes, September 2019)

(Unemployment in Prairies, September 2019)

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

CLICK HERE, for #1: temp workers, other migration categories.
CLICK HERE, for #2: close to 1M people/year entering on visas.
CLICK HERE, for #3: CANZUK, expansion and erasing the borders.
CLICK HERE, for #4: population replacement programs in Canada.
CLICK HERE, for #5: replacement numbers/countries since 2004.
CLICK HERE, for #6: domestic abuse as pathway to PR status.
CLICK HERE, for #7: the International Mobility Program.
CLICK HERE, for #8: economic imm, remittances, brain drain.
CLICK HERE, for #9: global remittance estimates, regulations.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

2. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for Service Canada, unemployment by region.
CLICK HERE, for Annual Reports to Parliament (2004-2018), which also cite number of TFWs admitted.
CLICK HERE, for Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program.
CLICK HERE, for non-compliant employers in TFWP.

CLICK HERE, for remittances and brain drain (economic migration).
CLICK HERE, for various replacement migration programs.
CLICK HERE, for immigration close to 1M/year.
CLICK HERE, for 2012 Calgary Herald article: EI causes high unemployment.
CLICK HERE, for a 2018 Global News article on Jason Kenney’s proposed Rural Alberta Immigration Program.
CLICK HERE, for Jason Kenney on AB job losses.
CLICK HERE, for a Toronto Star article on Alberta Rural Immigration Drive.
CLICK HERE, for Canada’s proposed Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot Program.
CLICK HERE, for True North News, on hiring TFWs for less.

3. Shocking Unemployment Stats

(All from 2019 listings)
7.5% – Newfoundland & Labrador, outside St. John’s
17.9% – Newfoundland & Labrador, outside St. John’s
6.8% – Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown
11.1% – Prince Edward Island, outside Charlottetown
13.8% – Eastern Nova Scotia
7.5% – Western Nova Scotia
5.6% – Nova Scotia, Halifax
6.2% – New Brunswick, Fredericton-Moncton-Saint John
9.1% – New Brunswick, Madawaska-Charlotte
13.4% – New Brunswick, Restigouche-Albert
11.7% – Northern Ontario
35.3% – Northern Manitoba
19.3% – Northern Saskatchewan
11.4% – Northern Alberta
9.7% – Northern British Columbia
12.7% – Northwest Territories
18.2% – Nunavut

One thing to point out: the EI rates only consider people who are on active EI claims. People who have had their benefits lapse are excluded from calculation. So the real numbers may be much higher.

4. Lax EI Rules Cause Unemployment?

My friend said she was willing to work all year long. Once word of this got out, she got calls from employers all over town fighting to hire someone willing to work over the winter.

One year in Petit Rocher, New Brunswick, the fish plant closed for lack of fish; the locals demanded a provincial make-work project until they could get fully stamped up. When the fish plant in the next town offered them work, and a free shuttle bus service to get there, the workers angrily refused — until the province told them if there was work available there would be no make-work.

The Ocean Choice fish plant in Souris, P.E.I., has to bring in temporary workers from as far away as Russia and Ukraine in a province with one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. Immigration Minister Jason Kenney finds this inexplicable. Look no farther than EI for that explanation.

My wife and I owned a restaurant in Halifax and had first-hand experience of the system. People would leave us resumes and then be genuinely puzzled when we phoned to offer them work. We apparently hadn’t understood the blindingly obvious: those resumes were strictly for the benefit of the EI administrators. Don’t try to blow the whistle on these cheats to EI, though; the people who administer it in Atlantic Canada long ago became complicit in the plundering of the system. The claimant is king and the local politicians who have fought for ever richer benefits for their constituents like it just fine that way.

We had applicants who would only agree to be hired if we would promise to lay them off when they had qualified for EI. They liked to do their crafts during the autumn and sell them (under the table for cash) at the Christmas craft fairs. Now you know why there are so many bad crafts in Atlantic Canada: it is your tax dollars at work.

This Calgary Herald article from 2012 suggested quite a different picture. The author believes that the EI rules are gamed in order to provide people an income for working only a few months a year.

It is further claimed that that politicians and administrators are complicit in the scheme as it provides a permanent supply of voters. An end run around welfare and having to work. Interesting article, well worth a read. if any of this is true, then it should merit a much stricter set of regulations, and kicking some people off permanently.

5. Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program

About the pilot
The Atlantic Immigration Pilot is a pathway to permanent residence for skilled foreign workers and international graduates who want to work and live in one of Canada’s 4 Atlantic Provinces:

Let’s get right to the point: this program is a direct pathway to permanent resident status.

Not only one person, but a husband or wife is also eligible for an open work permit. This is yet another pathway to permanent residence.

There are 3 streams:
(a) Atlantic International Graduate Program
(b) Atlantic High-Skilled Program
(c) Atlantic Intermediate-Skilled Program

Of course the obvious question: why is this program even being offered? Don’t people in the Maritimes constantly complain about there being no work available in the region? The unemployment numbers certainly seem to suggest that.

An interesting situation. Universities across Canada want more foreign students as they are needed to pay for their extensive budgets. Graduating from a Canadian college or university means fast-tracking to other visa options. While native Maritimers (allegedly) milk the EI rules to avoid working, those jobs are filled by people seeking easy citizenship.

Great way to replace your population.

6. Rural Alberta Immigration Push

As part of his campaign to become Alberta Premier, Jason Kenney has talked about expanding economic immigration. He said it was necessary to find people to fill jobs that otherwise were being left empty. He proposed an extra 10,000 people a year, much of it to rural Alberta.

However, this is blatantly contradicted by repeated claims made that Alberta has suffered heavy jobs losses, especially due to the losses in the oil sector. Among other factors, the Federal Liberal Government is blamed extensively.

This is the same man, as Federal Immigration Minister, imported Somali Muslims to work in a meat packing plant in Brooks, Alberta. Cheaper labour, but there were some other costs to be considered.

If oil is becoming an occupation for fewer and fewer people, then they would have to find other work, at least for the time being. How does it make sense to be importing large numbers of people to fill a “labour shortage”, when there is no shortage to begin with?

7. Rural and Northern Immigration Pilot

Under the pretense of declining population, the Federal Government is proposing massive immigration to (for now) 11 towns throughout Canada. They include:

  • Thunder Bay (ON)
  • Sault Ste. Marie (ON)
  • Sudbury (ON)
  • Timmins (ON)
  • North Bay (ON)
  • Gretna-Rhineland-Altona-Plum Coulee (MB)
  • Brandon (MB), Moose Jaw (SK)
  • Claresholm (AB)
  • West Kootenay (BC)
  • Vernon (BC)

Interestingly, Quebec will be exempt from this program. In fact, Quebec will be getting an overall reduction in immigration.

More migrants for thee.
But less migrants for me.

Other than population replacement, it isn’t clear why these towns were selected. After all, they do have fairly high unemployment.

But to be fair, employers will “always” say they have labour shortages. Having a surplus of workers causes wages to be driven down, as there becomes more demand for the same jobs.

8. Remittances Sent Out Of The Country

This was discussed in a previous article. We are repeatedly told that immigration is good for economic growth. Yet the issue of sending billions of dollars annually is omitted. Whose economies do remittances prop up? Every one except where the money originally came from.

9. Importing People Drives Down Wages

True North covered abuse and manipulation of the “Temporary” Foreign Worker Program. It included hiring people for less than comparable jobs for Canadians would have gone, dodging fees, and not advertising in good faith.

The Trudeau government’s Labour Minister Patricia Hajdu signed off on recommendations allowing eight southwestern Ontario corporations to not face punishment for incorrectly hiring approximately 615 Mexican and Jamaican migrants under the Temporary Foreign Workers Program’s farmworker classification for five years — in contravention of labour regulations

The foreign workers were hired to work in food processing plants, but were paid a farmworker’s wage of $14 an hour, four dollars less than the standard rate in food processing industry.

Hiring under the classification of agricultural workers, the memo says the eight corporations had a “distinct advantage over employers using the low wage stream of the TFW Program” because they didn’t have to pay the $1,000 per position processing fee and were only required to advertise the jobs to Canadians for two weeks instead of the four required for temporary foreign workers strictly working in food processing.

This isn’t about filling empty jobs. It is about importing cheaper labour than would otherwise be available. Instead of putting Canadians to work, and focusing on social cohesion, it becomes a race to the bottom.

10. This Doesn’t Put Canada First

Canadians should be getting first crack at the jobs. It shouldn’t be a competition against subsidized foreign labour. Shipping in more and more people helps employers and businesses, but puts additional pressure on workers. This is especially true if those newcomers are willing to work for less.

Looking at the unemployment rates (Northern Alberta and the Maritimes), it doesn’t seem to be a shortage of people available. That comes from official Service Canada data. Something is seriously wrong if there is both: (a) a huge labour shortage; and (b) high unemployment. It doesn’t add up.

To be fair though, if the allegations against many Maritimers is true, they should be kicked off EI. It was never meant to be abused like this.

This article focused on economic costs, but doesn’t get into the social costs. People go to smaller towns in order to get away from all the forced diversity.

IMM #7: International Mobility Program — An Extension of TFWP

(International Mobility Program, essentially an extension of TFWP, but no labour shortages actually are required. Open work permits)

(Information on open work permits)

(From immconsultant.net, on splitting program)

(Conservative Party of Canada policy is to look for ways to transition “temporary” workers into permanent residents, wherever feasible.)

(Source: 2018 Immigration Report to Parliament)

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

CLICK HERE, for #1: temp workers, other migration categories.
CLICK HERE, for #2: close to 1M people/year entering on visas.
CLICK HERE, for #3: CANZUK, expansion and erasing the borders.
CLICK HERE, for #4: population replacement programs in Canada.
CLICK HERE, for #5: replacement numbers/countries since 2004.
CLICK HERE, for #6: domestic abuse as pathway to PR status.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

2. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for WelcomeBC on International Mobility Program.
http://archive.is/2u2qD
CLICK HERE, for what an open work permit is.
http://archive.is/mCkIa
CLICK HERE, for who can get an open work permit.
http://archive.is/YLBfQ
CLICK HERE, for surge in I.M.P. participants.
http://archive.is/kYdyL
CLICK HERE, for a consultant page on changes to TFWP, to include I.M.P. as the “other” branch, one where no labour market assessment needed.
http://archive.is/3GbeX
CLICK HERE, for transitioning to permanent resident.
http://archive.is/U1943
CLICK HERE, for StatsCan blog, transitioning to PR.
http://archive.is/b1tkv
CLICK HERE, for CPC Policy Guide (Article 139)
CLICK HERE, for 2018 Report to Parliament (Canada)
CLICK HERE, for index of Reports to Parliament.

3. Context For Int’l Mobility Program

This program is sold to the public as mutual agreements between countries to allow “young people” the opportunity to work in the other country for a period of time. Typically the cut off age if 25-35 years old, but it varies with different countries. Also, the length of time varies between countries, but is typically 1-2 years.

There is a strong case to be made that a period of work and travel is young adulthood (also called a “Gap Year”) gives the person a broader view of the world. It also helps to strengthen bonds between nations. It allows a reasonable period to work and move freely in another land.

What then is the problem?

First there is the issue of remittances. A person working and then leaving will often take a considerable amount of money home with them, or send the money back to their families. That is money not being spent in the host economy.

Second, there is the supply and demand dilemma. Importing more people, even on a temporary basis means extra competition for citizens of that nation. Employers love it, but struggling workers will not.

Third, at least in Canada, and some other nations, these “working holiday” or “youth mobility” or “International Mobility” programs become the basis of permanent immigration into the country. While the benefits may be debated, it seems fair that the debate should be made publicly. After all, this is yet another immigration program. Note: the CPC openly supports such a policy.

4. Let’s Look At The Numbers

Also worth noting, 525,000 people got their citizenship in a 12 month period. This is despite the “backlog”, and only taking ~350,000 people into Canada.
Source: StatsCan population data.

Year TFW Int Mobility Student
2015 73,016 175,967 218,147
2016 78,402 207,829 265,111
2017 78,788 224,033 317,328

To repeat: all with pathway to permanent residence. Yes, not all will stay, but an awful lot will.

5. Splitting International Mobility and TFW

This article, addresses the topic, including the jurisdictions of the new programs.

New Requirements for the International Mobility Program
On June 20, 2014, the Government of Canada announced changes to the Temporary Foreign Worker Program (TFWP), including reorganizing the TFWP into two distinct programs:
(a) TFWP: requires a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA) and is led by Employment and Skills Development Canada (ESDC); and
(b) International Mobility Program: LMIA – exempt and led by Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC).
The following fees/regulations for the International Mobility Program came into force on February 21, 2015.

In short, the “Temporary” Foreign Worker Program will still require going through the motions of demonstrating that foreigners have to be hired, as no Canadian is available to fill these jobs.

The International Mobility Program will essentially be an open work permit where a person coming to Canada can work for anyone for a year or 2.

Worth noting, that in both programs, there are options available to extend your stay, and eventually transition into permanent resident.

Also worth noting is that while the number of TFW has declined, the number of Int’l Mobility participants has shot up. A cynic may wonder if this is a way of avoiding having to do labour analyses.

6. Who Is Eligible For Open Permit?

You may be eligible for an open work permit if you:
(a) are an international student who graduated from a designated learning institution and are eligible for the Post-Graduation Work Permit Program
(b) are a student who’s no longer able to meet the costs of your studies (destitute student)
(c) have an employer-specific work permit and are being abused or at risk of being abused in relation to your job in Canada
(d) applied for permanent residence in Canada
(e) are a dependent family member of someone who applied for permanent residence
(f) are the spouse or common-law partner of a skilled worker or international student
(g) are the spouse or common-law partner of an applicant of the Atlantic Immigration Pilot Program
(h) are a refugee, refugee claimant, protected person or their family member
(I) are under an unenforceable removal order
(j) are a temporary resident permit holder
(k) are a young worker participating in special programs
(l) In each of these situations, you must meet additional criteria to be eligible.
Answer a few questions to find out if you’re eligible for an open work permit.

(a) Typically refers to grads from college or university. Remember, there are hundreds of thousands of them every year.
(k) Presumably refers to International Mobility Program

Basically, an awful lot of people. The public is told that immigration is strictly controlled, and that it is skilled professionals who are getting in. Seems that everyone and their cousin is instead.

Students are allowed to work during the summer as much as they want. Even during school weeks they are allowed to work up to 20 hours/week. International Mobility Participants are not required to have any job or schooling set up before they arrive.

7. Why Mislead The Public?

The 2018 Report to Parliament cites at least 950,000 people as coming to Canada (for the year 2017). This is now 2019, and the numbers are almost certainly higher. However, the public is told that is was only about 300K-350K these last few years. Why lie about it?

(Numbers rounded off)
330,000 Permanent Class + refugee
+317,000 Student Visas
+224,000 International Mobility
+79,000 Temporary Foreign Worker

True, not all will stay, but an awful lot of the “temps” will. Whether the: (a) Student Visas; (b) International Mobility Participants; and (c) Temporary Foreign Workers should have a pathway to citizenship is a question worth discussing. Perhaps there are valid reasons for this.

The sticking point, however, is not including these categories in the figures released to the public. Big difference between:

(I) 300K people entering, and
(II) 300K + 600K “temps” entering.

Wouldn’t you agree?