Canadian Paediatric Society Shrugs Off Myocarditis And Pericarditis In Children

The Canadian Paediatric Society, or CPS, is a group that claims to be concerned with the health and well-being of young children. However, after looking at their website, there are grounds to be concerned. There is also a section on convincing children to wear masks, which is disturbing.

The CPS also pushes the racial justice narrative heavily, implying that tolerance and diversity will solve just about everything. Their Twitter account is full of this nonsense.

Particularly troubling is the “guidance” they gave out in September 2021, regarding myocarditis and pericarditis. These are serious side effects that can result — even in children — from taking the injections that the Government calls vaccines.

Abstract
This practice point aims to provide clinical guidance on myocarditis and pericarditis following mRNA COVID-19 vaccination (Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna). The benefits of COVID-19 vaccination outweigh the risks, and the vaccine is recommended for all eligible individuals, including children and youth in their 12th year and over. A small increased risk of myocarditis and pericarditis (< 1 case per 10,000) has been reported following vaccination with COVID-19 mRNA vaccines in Canada and internationally, most often among adolescents and young adults < 30 years of age, males, and after the second dose. Although this safety signal is occurring at higher-than-expected background rates, most cases are mild. This document reflects expert opinion and available evidence, which is limited. It will be updated as further information becomes available and as younger individuals are immunized against COVID-19.

Myocarditis. In general, most reported cases of myocarditis following COVID-19 mRNA vaccination have been mild and have shown response to NSAIDs. However, admission or close ambulatory monitoring should be considered until the clinical course of the illness is established. Severe cases with heart failure, arrhythmia or other complications of myocarditis require hospitalization, critical care support with appropriate management and monitoring.

Conclusions
(1) There is a temporal association between receiving mRNA COVID-19 vaccination and myocarditis and pericarditis among youth. These events are very rare. The risk-benefit decision for mRNA vaccination is favourable, and the vaccine is recommended for all eligible populations.
(2) Clinical evaluation should be in person and include a history, physical examination, and investigations (ECG, serum troponin and inflammatory markers).
(3) Most cases are benign, respond rapidly to NSAIDs alone, and can be safely managed in the ambulatory setting.
(4) All suspected and confirmed cases should be reported to local/provincial or territorial public health authorities as Adverse Events Following Immunization (AEFI)

Do you have any concerns over reports of myocarditis and pericarditis from people who’ve take the so-called vaccine? Don’t worry, it’s apparently nothing to be worried about.

In fairness, it’s a bit unclear whether this is the CPS’ official position, or just the work of contributors they published. Either way, it’s disturbing.

In their (now removed or relocated) policy position, the CPS references to myocarditis and pericarditis issues and seems to recommend the vaccines to children anyway. They do recommend these diagnoses be reported, however.

The CPS acknowledges that these “vaccines” could be causing heart problems, including in children. This group STILL recommends that kids get them. One has to wonder if there is more to this than meets the eye. Readers of this site will immediately suspect that some money has changed hands.

And yes, the answer is always the same. This “independent” group has been getting funds from entities that have an interest in pushing certain narratives.

According to their profile with the Federal Government, the CPS is looking at: “Expanding access to paediatric medications and therapeutics through federal legislation, regulatory and policy change”. In practical terms, this means pushing for ever greater influence of big pharma, even onto young children.

GOVERNMENT DEPARTMENT YEAR MONEY
Health Canada (HC) 2019 $114,388.00
Health Canada (HC) 2020 $150,681.00
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) 2017 $687,500.00
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) 2018 $121,142.00
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) 2019 $633,191.50
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) 2020 $664,891.00
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) 2021 $120,824.00
Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) 2021 $1,802,583.00
Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) 2019 $2,411,120.76
Public Services and Procurement Canada (PSPC) 2020 $2,689,025.00

What a shocker. The Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC), and Health Canada, are both major contributors to the Canadian Paediatric Society. Interestingly, those are dwarfed in size by Public Services and Procurement Canada.

One of the lobbyists, Samantha Grill, used to work for the Aga Khan Foundation, but that probably has no connection with anything. Most likely it’s just a coincidence.

The recent grants from Procurement Canada appear to come as part of contracts to engage in tracking and surveillance of health issues in Canada. In other words, The CPS is effectively hired to collect research data on young children as part of Canada’s policy formations.

The above information is available from the Lobbying Registry, and Open Search, two Government-run databases which track grants to various organizations.

To address the elephant in the room: does the CPS take private money? Yes it does, in the form of sponsorships. For the low price of $50,000 or $75,000 one can receive the following additional benefits:

  • Co-develop an accredited, 1-hour education symposium (includes coverage of all expenses: accreditation fees, speaker costs, meeting room rental, audio-visual service, catering and event promotion). Verbal recognition by session moderator and logo recognition as part of session
  • Opportunity to co-develop an accredited online education module at a discounted rate. The module will be hosted on. Pedagogy for 1 year
  • One-on-one meeting with CPS leadership and CPS staff

This was outlined in a paper promoting the conference in May 2022. Now, who would want to develop education modules, or education symposiums? Why, drug companies of course. That way, paediatricians can be “educated” in the latest wonder drug that big pharma has to offer.

It seems unlikely that individuals would be interested in dropping this kind of money, regardless of the prestige. However, a drug company would just see this as the cost of doing business.

This comes across as a pay-to-play system where a large enough cheque means determining what gets addressed with other members.

Of course, this issue isn’t limited to the Canadian group. The Provinces also have similar organizations, and they also appear to be compromised. Take the time to do your own research.

(1) https://cps.ca/
(2) https://caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/healthy-living/masks-and-children-during-covid
(3) https://cps.ca/en/about-apropos
(4) https://cps.ca/documents/position/clinical-guidance-for-youth-with-myocarditis-and-pericarditis
(5) Canadian Paediatric Society Pericarditis Myocarditis
(6) http://web.archive.org/web/20211220062530/https://cps.ca/en/documents/position/vaccine-for-children-5-to-11
(7) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/srch/pub/dsplyRprtngPrd?q.srchNmFltr=paediatric&q.stts=0007&selectedCharityBn=118920412RR0001&dsrdPg=1
(8) Canadian Paediatric Foundation Charity
(9) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/
(10) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?cno=258842&regId=918505
(11) https://buyandsell.gc.ca/procurement-data/tender-notice/PW-SS-041-34649
(12) https://twitter.com/CanPaedSociety
(13) https://cps.ca/uploads/about/Final_-_2022_CPS_Sponsorship_Opportunities_Document_-_August_20_-_2021.pdf
(14) Final_-2022_CPS_Sponsorship_Opportunities_DocumentAugust_20-_2021
(15) https://www.linkedin.com/in/samantha-grills-ba240742/details/experience/
(16) Experience _ Samantha Grills _ LinkedIn

(A) https://canucklaw.ca/health-canada-initially-created-for-population-control-measures/
(B) https://canucklaw.ca/cv-62g-public-health-agency-of-canada-created-as-branch-of-who
(C) https://canucklaw.ca/canadian-pharmaceutical-sciences-foundation-a-registered-charity-funded-by-drug-companies/
(D) https://canucklaw.ca/canadian-pharmacists-association-campaigning-at-taxpayer-expense-to-grow-big-drug-industry/
(E) https://canucklaw.ca/canadian-immunization-research-network-is-funded-by-big-pharma/
(F) https://canucklaw.ca/society-of-obstetricians-and-gynaecologists-funded-by-pfizer-recommends-vaccines-boosters/
(G) https://canucklaw.ca/canimmunize-working-with-big-pharma-on-national-vaccination-certification-medical-research/

Chambers Of Commerce: Collecting Subsidies While Calling For Open Borders

According to the CEWS Registry, the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy has been handed out to some 235 institutions that have “Chamber of Commerce” as part of their name. That should alarm people, that hundreds of organizations that claim to promote business are getting handouts from Ottawa — or rather, taxpayers.

The Chambers of Commerce are just part of a long list of institutions that are getting funded to shill the “pandemic” narrative. These include: restaurants and hotels, political parties, law firms, more law firms, churches, and trucking associations, to name a few.

While it would be unrealistic to do a profile on all 235 organizations, let’s take a look at one: The Canadian Chamber of Commerce.

Description of the organization’s activities
Founded in 1925, the Canadian Chamber of Commerce is the nation’s largest business association, representing small and large firms from every sector and region in Canada. The Canadian Chamber is a network of 420 community chambers and boards of trade across Canada, in addition to individual corporate members and over 80 trade and professional organizations. The total membership exceeds 192,000. It is dedicated to the promotion and development of a strong economy. The chamber monitors federal and international issues, solicits the views of the Canadian business community and communicates them to policymakers in Ottawa and internationally. Headquartered in Ottawa, it also has staff in Toronto, Montreal and Calgary.

This is how the group describes its activities.

Instead of calling for people to be able to run their businesses freely, and with minimal interference, the Chamber of Commerce parrots the line that vaccines and rapid tests are the quickest way back to normal. On the surface, it looks like they are playing along because of the financial incentives provided. More on that coming up.

The “wins” they brag about include getting CEWS and CERS extended. CERS is the Canada Emergency Rental Subsidy which is available for businesses. This “business” group also brags about getting the hiring subsidy created, so that taxpayers help fund new employees.

While this organization does receive private donations, it undeniably is getting Government handouts as well. In fact, this has been happening for many years.

GOVERNMENT BRANCH SOURCE YEAR AMOUNT
Bank of Canada 2019 $1,375.00
Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC) 2015 $5,000.00
Canada Foundation for Innovation 2020 $2,300.00
Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC) 2021 $5,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2014 $10,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2015 $6,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2017 $6,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2018 $1,900.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2020 $10,000.00
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2021 $30,000.00
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) 2020 $850,623.60
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) 2021 $118,464.75
Competition Bureau Canada (COBU) 2016 $1,800.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2018 $3,400.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2019 $74,496.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2020 $22,451.00
Employment and Social Development Canada (ESDC) 2021 $12,180
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2017 $56,548.68
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2018 $29,600.00
Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) 2019 $2,500.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2014 $37,500.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2015 $29,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2016 $42,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2017 $63,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2018 $65,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2019 $65,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2020 $51,000.00
Export Development Canada (EDC) 2021 $79,100.00
Farm Credit Canada (FCC) 2018 $2,500.00
FedDev Agency for Southern Ontario 2018 $2,300.00
FedDev Agency for Southern Ontario 2020 $2,300.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2017 $1,900.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2018 $1,900.00
Global Affairs Canada (GAC) 2019 $2,300.00
Health Canada (HC) 2021 $4,947,978.19
Industry Canada 2014 $1,500.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2015 $1,800.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2016 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2018 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2019 $2,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2020 $530,300.00
Innovation, Science and Economic Development Canada 2021 $2,300.00
Montreal Port Authority 2020 $5,000.00
Montreal Port Authority 2021 $5,000.00
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) 2015 $132,300.00
Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) 2017 $22,122.12
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2014 $1,500.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2015 $1,800.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2016 $1,800.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2017 $1,900.00
Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) 2019 $2,000.00
Office of the Procurement Ombudsman (OPO) 2020 $2,300.00
Office of the Taxpayers’ Ombudsman 2018 $2,300.00
Ontario Federation of Agriculture 2020 $5,000.00
Port Alberni Port Authority 2016 $10,000.00
Prince Rupert Port Authority 2016 $4,500.00
Public Works and Government Services Canada 2014 $1,500.00
Royal Canadian Mint 2014 $2,500.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2014 $32,500.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2015 $10,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2016 $43,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2017 $65,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2018 $50,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2019 $40,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2020 $40,000.00
Vancouver Fraser Port Authority (Port Metro Vancouver) 2021 $57,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2016 $7,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2017 $18,500.00
VIA Rail Canada 2019 $10,000.00
VIA Rail Canada 2020 $10,000.00
VIA Rail Canada 2021 $15,000.00

You’d be forgiven for thinking that these were really Communists. Now, what is the Chamber of Commerce getting for itself? The listings should scare you. Keep in mind, that other Chambers of Commerce are likely also receiving money at the local level.

The Canadian Chamber of Commerce has been getting handouts going back many years. The CEWS is really just the least of it. It would also be interesting to know what the conditions were for that nearly $5 million they received from Health Canada.

The Chamber doesn’t appear to call for the end to martial law restrictions. Instead, they lobby for more handouts in order to cope with lockdowns. For a business orientated group, they seem completely okay with Government interference and restrictions.

There also appears to be no issue with policies like vaccine passports. After all, if Canadians don’t want to play along, they can just be replaced by TFWs who took the shots as a condition of employment.

This group also calls for drastically increased immigration, and more ways to remain in Canada. They also support free trade which will see industries outsourced based on cost. Think about how this plays out in the long term.

[1] Flood Canada with more people, driving up demand for work
[2] Support trade deals which reduce the supply of available work

Never mind the social impacts of importing large numbers from very different backgrounds, or the culture clash that will result. It appears these business groups don’t care about such things.

If you think it’s bad now, the agenda from a few years back is even worse. Or perhaps it’s just more open about what they really wanted then.

BORDER CROSSINGS – Beyond the Borders Initiative, with respect to implementation of the action plan items.
BORDER CROSSINGS – with respect to the development of a new International Crossing between Windsor and Detroit.
FREE TRADE AGREEMENTS – Promote balanced free trade agreements for Canada with Europe, India Japan and Korea. Promote Canada’s participation in the Trans-Pacific partnership and in the Trade in Services Agreement
IMMIGRATION – Expedited application process with regard to giving priority to applicants who possess skills in short supply in Canada and processing their applications within 6-12 months.
IMMIGRATION – Foreign Credentials Recognition Program with regard to working with the provinces/territories and business community to develop national accreditation standards to evaluate foreign credentials, professional and trade qualifications, and certification in regulated and non-regulated occupations that reflect employers’ needs
IMMIGRATION: Changes intended to attract and retain international students with respect to work permits, applications for permanent residency, and processing times for applications.
IMMIGRATION: Changes to increase the number of economic immigrants to this country to double the current rate. Renegotiation and signing of new memoranda of understanding with each of the provinces and territories to increase provincial caps for Provincial Nominee Programs. Adequate staffing of local Citizenship and Immigration Canada offices to meet demand and alleviate the labour market shortages.
IMMIGRATION: Regional strategy for settlement needs and at levels of service to ensure access to skilled workers in all regions of the country.
International Trade: Expanding trade and investment links with developing countries.
Labour: Ensuring that any changes to the Canada Labour Code are implemented only if they address a real problem or result in improvement for these employers, their employee and/or the Canadians they serve.
Labour: Asking the federal government, specifically the Department of Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development, to work with the Canadian private sector to identify ways to increase long-term formal employment opportunities for the poor in developing countries, and facilitate the availability of financial institutional products and services, including microfinance, to stimulate job creation for the poor

The above section includes items from 2014 (#36 on their profile with the Lobbying Registry). The Canadian Chamber of Commerce (and presumably all chapters) support virtually open borders as it ensures ready access to an endless supply of cheaper labour.

Put bluntly, Canadian taxpayers are helping to finance groups calling for outsourcing of industries, and the importing of a new work force for what’s left. It not only causes havoc with jobs, but drives down wages for the ones that remain.

Now, about those 235 groups receiving the CEWS:

  • 1000 ISLANDS GANANOQUE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ABBOTSFORD CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Aboriginal Chamber Of Commerce – Grand Rapids
  • AIRDRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ALBERNI VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ALBERTA CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
  • ANNAPOLIS VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • AURORA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BAFFIN REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BANCROFT & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BATHURST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BATTLEFORDS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BEAUMONT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • BONNYVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • BOW VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • BRACEBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRANDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRAZIL-CANADA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BRIGHTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BROCKVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BURLINGTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • BURNS LAKE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA DELL’ ONTARIO/ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE OF ONTARIO
  • CAMPBELL RIVER AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CAMROSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CANADIAN GERMAN CHAMBER OF INDUSTRY AND COMMERCE INC
  • Canadian Women’s Chamber of Commerce
  • CASTLEGAR & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CENTRE WELLINGTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHAMBER OF COMMERCE BRANTFORD-BRANT
  • CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SERVING COQUITLAM, PORT COQUITLAM PORT MOODY
  • Chamber of Marine Commerce CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE MARITIME
  • Chambre de commerce Canada-Floride/ Chamber of commerce Canada-florida
  • Chambre de commerce de l’Est de Montréal Eastern Montreal Chamber of Commerce
  • CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE ET D’INDUSTRIE DE BÉCANCOUR NICOLET-YAMASKA / BECANCOUR NICOLET-YAMASKA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHARLOTTETOWN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHATHAM-KENT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHETWYND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CHILLIWACK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CLOVERDALE DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Coboconk, Norland & Area Chamber of Commerce
  • COLD LAKE REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • COLUMBIA VALLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CORNWALL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • COWICHAN LAKE DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • CRANBROOK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DAWSON CITY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • DAWSON CREEK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DELTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DRUMHELLER AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DRYDEN DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • DUNCAN-COWICHAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EAST GWILLIMBURY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EAST HANTS AND DISTRICTS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Eastern Prince Edward Island Chamber of Commerce Inc.
  • EDMONTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • EDMUNDSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE/LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE LA REGION D’EDMUNDSTON INC
  • ESTEVAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FENELON FALLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FERNIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT FRANCES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT MACLEOD AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT MCMURRAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT NELSON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT SASKATCHEWAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FORT ST JOHN AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • FREDERICTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GANDER & AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC
  • GEORGINA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GIBSONS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRANDE PRAIRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRAVENHURST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER BARRIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER KINGSTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER LANGLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER NANAIMO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER NIAGARA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER OSHAWA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER PETERBOROUGH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Greater Saskatoon Chamber of Commerce
  • GREATER SUDBURY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER VERNON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GREATER VICTORIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GRIMSBY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • GUANGDONG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE (CANADA)
  • GUELPH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALIBURTON HIGHLANDS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALIFAX CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HALTON HILLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • HUMBOLDT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE CORP.
  • HUNTSVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • INDO-CANADA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • INNISFAIL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN CANADA – WEST/CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA IN CANADA – OVEST
  • JASPER PARK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KAMLOOPS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KAWARTHA LAKES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE-EASTERN REGION
  • KELOWNA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KENORA AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KENSINGTON AND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KIMBERLEY BAVARIAN SOCIETY
  • KINDERSLEY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • KITIMAT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE GASPE – /GASPÉ CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE DE MANIWAKI-THE MANIWAKI CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LA CHAMBRE DE COMMERCE ITALIENNE AU CANADA. ITALIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE IN CANADA CAMERA DI COMMERCIO ITALIANA IN CANADA
  • LA CRETE AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LAB WEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LABRADOR NORTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • LAC LA BICHE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Lacombe and District Chamber of Commerce
  • LADYSMITH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LAKE COUNTRY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LEAMINGTON DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LEDUC REGIONAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LETHBRIDGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LINCOLN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LINDSAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LLOYDMINSTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MEDICINE HAT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MILTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MOOSE JAW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MORDEN AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MOUNT PEARL PARADISE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • MUSKOKA LAKES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NELSON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NEW WESTMINSTER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NEWMARKET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • NIAGARA-ON-THE-LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • NORTH BAY AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Northumberland Central Chamber of Commerce
  • NWT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • OAKVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ORILLIA AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • ORO-MEDONTE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • OWEN SOUND & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PARKSVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEACE RIVER BOARD OF TRADE AND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEACHLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PEMBERTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PENTICTON AND WINE COUNTRY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PLACENTIA AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PONOKA & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • PORT HARDY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PORT HOPE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PORTAGE LA PRAIRIE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • POWELL RIVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • PRAIRIE SKY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • PRINCE GEORGE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • QUESNEL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • QUINTE WEST CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RADIUM HOT SPRINGS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RED DEER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • REGINA & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RENFREW CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • REVELSTOKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RICHMOND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • RUSSELL AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SALT SPRING ISLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SARNIA LAMBTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SASKATCHEWAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SAUGEEN SHORES CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SAULT STE MARIE AND DISTRICT OF CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SELKIRK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC
  • SHERWOOD PARK & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SICAMOUS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SIMCOE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SMITHERS DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SMITHS FALLS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOCIETY OF THE MORINVILLE AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOUTH SURREY AND WHITE ROCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SOUTHERN GEORGIAN BAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Springfield Chamber of Commerce Inc.
  • SQUAMISH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE.
  • ST. ALBERT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SOCIETY
  • ST PAUL & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ASSOCIATION
  • ST THOMAS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • STONY PLAIN & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • STRATHROY AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SUMMERLAND CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SUSSEX AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE INC.
  • SWIFT CURRENT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • SYLVAN LAKE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE ARMSTRONG-SPALLUMCHEEN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE BRITISH COLUMBIA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CALGARY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CANADIAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE NIAGARA FALLS, CANADA
  • THE EDSON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • The Greater Kitchener Waterloo Chamber of Commerce
  • THE GREATER MONCTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE GREATER SUMMERSIDE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE HAMILTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE MACKENZIE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE MANITOBA CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
  • THE MOUNT FOREST DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PARRY SOUND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PAS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PERTH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE PRINCE EDWARD COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE SAANICH PENINSULA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THE TABER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • The Winkler and District Chamber of Commerce
  • THE WINNIPEG CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • THUNDER BAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TILLSONBURG DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TIMMINS CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TOBERMORY & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TOFINO-LONG BEACH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Trail Chamber of Commerce
  • TRENT HILLS AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • TRURO AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • UCLUELET CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VAUGHAN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VEGREVILLE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • VERMILION CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WASKESIU CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WELLAND/PELHAM CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST PRINCE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST SHORE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEST VANCOUVER CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WEYBURN CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITBY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITCHURCH STOUFFVILLE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITECOURT AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WHITEHORSE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WIARTON AND DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • WILLIAMS LAKE & DISTRICT CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • Windsor-Essex Regional Chamber of Commerce
  • WOODSTOCK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YARMOUTH AND AREA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YELLOWKNIFE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
  • YORKTON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Do you get it now? Your tax dollars are being used to support these “Chambers of Commerce”. These groups lobby Federal and Provincial Governments to spend even more money propping up businesses which impose mask and vaccine rules. They also support the open border agenda to mass import people who will work for less, and who are more receptive to taking experimental shots.

In many ways, this comes across as a protection racket. These groups push for certain “safety” grants and measures for their members, but always ones that profit them as well.

(1) https://chamber.ca/
(2) https://chamber.ca/campaign/business-led-recovery/
(3) https://chamber.ca/advocacy/wins-for-canadian-business/
(4) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/cews/srch/pub/bscSrch
(5) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?regId=812012&cno=15787#regStart

(A) https://canucklaw.ca/media-subsidies-and-govt-financing/
(B) https://canucklaw.ca/media-controlled-opposition/
(C) https://canucklaw.ca/groups-calling-for-vaccine-passports-heavily-subsidized-by-government/
(D) https://canucklaw.ca/trudeau-using-taxpayer-money-to-subsidize-opposition-parties-liberals-too/
(E) https://canucklaw.ca/law-firms-bar-associations-receiving-canada-emergency-wage-subsidy-cews/
(F) https://canucklaw.ca/conflicting-out-its-not-just-cews-that-the-lawyers-are-receiving/
(G) https://canucklaw.ca/following-the-money-why-are-churches-really-pushing-the-vaxx-agenda
(H) https://canucklaw.ca/canadian-trucking-alliance-raising-lots-of-questions-lately/

Digital ID & Authentication Council Of Canada (DIACC), Pan-Canadian Trust Framework

Remember voting for either of the Digital ID & Authentication Council Of Canada (DIACC), or the Pan-Canadian Trust Framework? Recall any public discussion or debate on these issues? If not, you probably aren’t alone.

This campaign is a private-public partnership, and done without any real consultation. Interestingly, it started in 2016, which is when GAVI, Microsoft and Rockefeller launched ID2020.

Now, what is it that DIACC is looking to do? Here’s why they are in consultations with the Canadian Government.

According to their “strategic goals” section, the plan is to:

  • Create, publish, and evolve the Pan-Canadian Trust Framework and identify the legislative needs to support the vision.
  • Accelerate interoperability by securing adoption of the Pan-Canadian Trust Framework by businesses and governments.
  • Design, develop, launch a certification program aligned with market needs.
  • Raise profile of Canada’s digital identity innovation via the DIACC as Canada’s digital identity forum.
  • Create Canadian expertise and intellectual property for excellence in digital identity.

It isn’t really explained how any of this would actually be accomplished, nor does it seem very reassuring that the data couldn’t be hacked, sold, or traded. Other than data-mining or research, it’s hard to see what economic benefits are expected.

And while there are vague references to economic benefits, there’s little mention of what Canadians think. That could be because there weren’t consultation.

Legislative Proposal, Bill or Resolution
Budget 2022 as it relates to the Pan-Canadian Trust Framework and digital identification
-The government’s Digital Charter Implementation Act as it relates to prioritizing digital identification and public sector data

Policies or Programs
-Collaborate with policy makers to develop policies and programs that support the pan-canadian digital ID and authentication framework and the incorporation of digital ID and authentication considerations into government -programs and initiatives.
-Raising awareness on the need to implement a digital identity system that empowers Canadians to control their data that is held by the federal government.

The part about “raising awareness on the need to implement a digital identity system” comes across as a call to engage in propaganda efforts, to ensure Canadians don’t understand what’s really happening.

GOVERNMENT BRANCH DATE AMOUNT
Canada Post Corporation (CPC) 2021-08-31 $50,000
Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) 2020-08-31 $2,750
City of Toronto 2021-08-31 $10,000
Gouvernement du Quebec 2021-08-31 $50,000
Government Chief Information Officer, Province of BC 2021-08-31 $50,000
Land and Title Authority of British Columbia 2021-08-31 $10,000
Ministry of Government Services, Province of Ontario 2021-08-31 $50,000
Service New Brunswick, Province of New Brunswick 2021-08-31 $50,000
Treasury Board Of Canada Secretariat (TBS) 2020-08-31 $50,000
Treasury Board Of Canada Secretariat (TBS) 2021-08-31 $50,000

The Federal Lobbying Registry sheds some light on the grants that DIACC has been getting in the last few years. DIACC isn’t also listed on the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy page, but perhaps the rental subsidy is the $2,750 they received from the CRA.

The lobbyist pushing this, at least in Ottawa, is Jacqueline LaRocque. She has been involved in the Government from 1994 to 2004, which aligns with the years of Jean Chretien and Paul Martin. Her Linkedin profile is even more interesting, as she reveals having been a lobbyist for GlaxoSmithKine — the drug manufacturer — for 4 years after leaving government.

Keep in mind, in 1993 to 2006, Canada was run by the Liberals. They are once again. Many of the same partisan operatives from those days are still around now. Granted, there’s little difference between the parties, but that’s a discussion for another time.

What makes this even more settling is that there are a few Directors of DIACC who are currently involved in Government affairs. This includes the Canadian, Ontario, New Brunswick and B.C. Governments.

What we have here is sitting members of various Governments running a group to implement digital identification across Canada, partnered with private interests who stand to benefit from this. Again, no one ever voted for any of this, and it’s unlikely there were ever any widespread consultations.

Many directors at DIACC also have past and present connections to financial institutions. We have to ask what is the real motivation driving this digital ID push?

Perhaps the most interesting member is Neil Butters. He has worked on these kind of systems in the United States, and helped develop a smart card system for border crossings for Israel. Now, given the rampant surveillance undertaken in the U.S. and Israel, do Canadians have to worry about these digital systems being backdoored? Given the power that this kind of information has, can it really been dismissed out of hand?

Canadian Finance Minister Flaherty appointed the Task Force for the Payments System Review in 2010, made up of representatives from the public and private sectors, privacy commissioners offices, and consumer advocates. One of the key outcomes was recognition that digital ID and authentication are integral to the success of digital payments and to Canada’s digital economy.

The DIACC was created in 2012 to continue the activities of the Electronic Payments Task Force and achieve their vision for a robust, secure, scalable, and privacy-enhancing structure for transacting online.

As a self-governing and not-for-profit council, the DIACC brings together public and private sector members to collaborate and advance Canada’s digital identification and authentication ecosystem. This is accomplished by delivering a digital trust framework that will unlock digital economy opportunities for every Canadian.

DIACC establishes Expert Committees (ECs) to move high-impact projects forward. Chaired by members of the council, the committees run strategic projects and create valuable resources.

In its “principles” section, it explains that the Task Force for the Payments System Review was created in 2010 by then Finance Minister, Jim Flaherty. So this was actually started with the Conservatives were in power, and the Liberals seem to have carried on as normal. DIACC was launched in 2012 as a continuation.

Worth noting: while Jim Flaherty helped push digital identity (Federally) a decade ago, his wife, Christine Elliott, is now the Health Minister of Ontario. That Province is expected to fully adopt digital identity.

In their lobbying section, DIACC referenced the old Bill C-11, which died when the last election was called. For some extra information, Bill C-11 had concerns about facial recognition technology being used, and the safety of medical data. This isn’t addressed, at least not on their site.

For people concerned about their information, and who has access, the lack of specific detail is concerning. How will this be used, and what safeguards will be put in place? What remedies are available when the inevitable data breaches occur?

(1) https://diacc.ca/
(2) https://diacc.ca/trust-framework/
(3) https://diacc.ca/the-diacc/strategic-goals/
(4) https://diacc.ca/the-diacc/principles/
(5) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?cno=368714&regId=917592#regStart
(6) https://id2020.org/alliance
(7) https://www.linkedin.com/in/jonibrennan/
(8) Joni Brennan _ LinkedIn
(9) https://www.linkedin.com/in/jacqueline-jacquie-larocque-57816713/details/experience/
(10) Experience _ Jacqueline (Jacquie) LaRocque _ LinkedIn
(11) https://www.linkedin.com/in/robert-devries-165b721/
(12) Robert Devries _ LinkedIn
(13) https://www.linkedin.com/in/dave-nikolejsin-b4b1273/
(14) Dave Nikolejsin _ LinkedIn
(15) https://www.linkedin.com/in/cjritchie/
(16) CJ Ritchie _ LinkedIn
(17) https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcbrouillard/
(18) Marc Brouillard _ LinkedIn
(19) https://www.linkedin.com/in/colleen-boldon-47732a12/
(20) Colleen Boldon _ LinkedIn
(21) https://www.linkedin.com/in/neilbutters/
(22) Neil Butters _ LinkedIn

Compilation Video Of “Pandemic” Psychological Warfare Against Society (Extended Also Available)

A video of nearly 90 minutes has been put together for your viewing. Yes, it’s a bit glitchy in a few places, but this is the first attempt something this size. Nothing here should be all that surprising. A page will be going up soon with all of the supporting links for more information.

Given YouTube’s rather “questionable” (or non-existent) commitment to free speech, here it is posted on Odysee. Everyone who sees it is encouraged to save and/or mirror it. The censorship gods strike hard and fast.

The extended version is also posted, which contains material that was missing from the previous video. Here it is on Odysee.

Considering how easy most of this was to find, the only explanation for it not being reported in the mainstream press is that they have been bought off. This applies to “conservative” media and to the vast majority of self-described independents.

Thank you to a number of people who have helped out over the last year, and in particular, Fred and Andy. Christine and Shelly also deserve a shoutout for their work.

Happy New Year, everyone!

Take care of yourselves, and your families.

(1) https://odysee.com/@CanuckLaw:8/CV-Is-A-Real-Danger:f
(2) https://odysee.com/@CanuckLaw:8/CV-Hoax-Compilation-02:d
(3) https://www.bitchute.com/video/MmFDnULRHs1L/
(4) https://www.fluoridefreepeel.ca/fois-reveal-that-health-science-institutions-around-the-world-have-no-record-of-sars-cov-2-isolation-purification/
(5) https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRBSHsj0RvI-IYO0qUmMbvA
(6) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B095Y515XK
(7) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B09BCNP48J

Ottawa’s Bipartisan Love Of Giving Aga Khan Money

It’s all just an act.

Remember the times in recent years when Members of Parliament pretended to be outraged about Trudeau being so close to Aga Khan? Maybe they were just upset about not getting invited themselves.

One would think that there’d be more of a stink about the sheer amount of money the public was handing over without any sort of democratic mandate or referendum. This isn’t to defend Trudeau in any way, but this trip isn’t exactly the the worst of it.

Strange that the so-called “conservative” media would never write about what was really going on. Guess they need to prop up their side.

Note: there were 2 different search engines used to compile this article, which gave overlapping, albeit different results. One was from Open Search, and the other from the Federal Lobbying Registry. Both will be included to show all figures.

DATE BODY ISSUING AMOUNT
Oct. 29, 2014 Global Affairs Canada $12,000,000
Mar. 18, 2015 Global Affairs Canada $293,892
Mar. 30, 2015 Global Affairs Canada $1,500,000
Apr. 21, 2015 Global Affairs Canada $10,625,000
Nov. 30, 2015 Global Affairs Canada $71,914
Dec. 22, 2015 International Development Assistance Program $55,000,000
Feb. 22, 2016 Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada $125,985
Mar. 31, 2016 Global Affairs Canada $10,533,873
Mar. 31, 2016 International Development Assistance Program $24,964,678
Mar. 31, 2016 Global Affairs Canada $1,250,000
Mar. 31, 2016 Immigration, Refugees and Citizenship Canada $312,838
Oct. 27, 2016 Canadian Heritage $12,837
Jan. 11, 2017 Global Affairs Canada $7,000,000
Jan. 12, 2017 Global Affairs Canada $12,000,000
Oct. 1, 2018 Global Affairs Canada $19,380,037
Apr. 1, 2019 Canadian Heritage $60,052
Jun. 29, 2019 Canadian Heritage $8,790
Dec. 6, 2019 Global Affairs Canada $59,792
Feb. 21, 2020 Global Affairs Canada $47,000,000
Apr. 1, 2020 Canadian Heritage $40,000
Jun. 30, 2020 Canadian Heritage $6,590
Nov. 18, 2020 Global Affairs Canada $2,000,000
Nov. 20, 2020 Global Affairs Canada $27,785
Mar. 29, 2021 Employment and Social Development Canada $100,000
Apr. 1, 2021 Canada Arts Presentation Fund $25,000

Next, we come to the Federal Lobbying Registry. It outlines amounts handed out annually, and where they came from, but doesn’t specify the specific assignment of project involved.

YEAR BODY ISSUING AMOUNT
2010 Canadian International Development Agency $19,838,431
2011 Canadian International Development Agency $16,912,457
2011 Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada $180,949
2012 Canadian International Development Agency $21,997,201
2012 Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada $1,575,197
2013 Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada $410,481
2013 International Development Research Centre $169,000
2014 Foreign Affairs, Trade and Development Canada $50,513,370
2014 International Development Research Centre $594,190
2015 Global Affairs Canada $46,796,700
2015 International Development Research Centre $578,585
2016 Global Affairs Canada $48,966,065
2016 International Development Research Centre $396,299
2017 Global Affairs Canada $36,737,220
2017 International Development Research Centre $1,425,000
2018 Global Affairs Canada $31,354,539
2018 International Development Research Centre $560,972
2020 Global Affairs Canada $22,735,954
2020 International Development Research Centre $363,718

The Lobbying Registry, likely through a gap in registration records, doesn’t list anything for 2019. And information for 2021 isn’t yet available. However, it does still show $200 million since 2010. And it doesn’t stop there.

According to the Canada Revenue Agency, the grants go back to 2003, although it doesn’t specify how much. What has this group gotten in total? It’s over $200 million, but unclear how much more. Strange, it’s not like Canadians could have used that or anything.

Wild idea: but maybe politicians in Ottawa feign outrage over a $200,000 trip so that the public won’t notice that they’ve handed out some $200 million to a foreign NGO. Just putting it out there.

(1) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/
(2) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/?sort=score%20desc&page=1&search_text=aga%20khan#
(3) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/advSrch
(4) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/advSrch?V_SEARCH.command=refineCategory&V_TOKEN=1234567890&V_SEARCH.scopeCategory=solr.facetName.documentType%3D
(5) https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/charities-giving/other-organizations-that-issue-donation-receipts-qualified-donees/other-qualified-donees-listings/list-foreign-charities-that-have-received-a-gift-majesty-right-canada.html
(6) https://twitter.com/erinotoole/status/1470506345455628290
(7) https://www.ndtv.com/world-news/justin-trudeau-vacation-to-aga-khans-island-broke-ethics-rules-1790408

FOR SOME EXTRA READING
(A) https://www.civilianintelligencenetwork.ca/2020/04/23/the-united-nations-aga-khans-throne-part-i-money-laundering/
(B) https://www.civilianintelligencenetwork.ca/2019/04/12/the-aga-khans-stranglehold-on-alberta/
(C) https://www.civilianintelligencenetwork.ca/2020/05/22/the-united-nations-aga-khans-throne-part-2-pluralism-and-banking/

Bluink Ltd: Developing Digital Identity & Vaccine Certification

Bluink is a company that’s working on systems of digital identification and verification of identify. The rationale is that this will ultimately be more secure than having physical documents. This could have potential uses both in the private and public sector. Of course, things get a bit more disturbing when you realize their latest project: a nationwide vaccine passport system. The Federal Lobbying Registry states that they’re in talks with Ottawa over the 2 subjects.

(a) Development of alignment between provincial vaccine certifications and federal standards
(b) Development of digital identification and verification standards.

According to their website, Bluink is able to run their system with driver’s licenses and service cards in all Provinces and Territories. They are also able to do Canadian, Chinese, French and U.S. passports.

Now, Bluink is also working on “aligning provincial certifications and federal standards”. In short, this means compiling a national vaccine passport system. In fairness, being in talks doesn’t mean the papers are signed, but this would be just the company to do it.

Think about it: a company that is already able to do digital ID for all Provincial and Territorial ID (and passports) is also quite likely to build a national vaccine certification system. The obvious question is that what stops this company — or any user — from simply combining the systems? How hard would it be to attach your vaccine status to a driver’s license, health card, or passport? Even if this isn’t the company to do it, Ottawa could always bring in someone else to take that last step.

If you have the full name and birthdate of every health card and vaccine record, how much work would it be to merge them into a single record?

This is also another case of “funding your own demise”, as we will get into. Taxpayers are on the hook for this creeping erosion of privacy.

No, surprise. Bluink is listed with the C.R.A. as having received the CEWS, or the Canada Emergency Wage Subsidy. And if they are getting that, then the rental subsidies are likely thrown in too. Really, at this point, what company “hasn’t” been getting them?. Real capitalism seems non-existent, as everything is nationalized. And it keeps going.

According to the Lobbying Registry, it received nearly $2 million in the year 2020 from: (a) Canada Border Services Agency (CBSA); (b) Canada Post Corporation (CPC): and (c) Shared Services Canada (SSC). More is expected to get more money in 2021 and beyond. Some information about the lobbyists is given later on.

The choice of granting institutions is interesting. The CBSA won’t stop people illegally entering the country, but at least we’ll be able to given them a digital ID. That’s great.

TIME PERIOD INSTUTITION GRANTING AMOUNT
May 2, 2012 National Research Council $50,000
Apr. 15, 2013 National Research Council $40,000
Apr. 15, 2013 National Research Council $500,000
Oct. 30, 2013 National Research Council $30,000
Jun. 25, 2015 National Research Council $87,500
Sep. 29, 2015 National Research Council $47,500
Mar. 4, 2016 National Research Council $25,500
Sep. 6, 2016 National Research Council $205,750
Sep. 6, 2016 National Research Council $148,750
Jul. 1, 2018 National Research Council $50,000
Oct. 21, 2018 National Research Council $50,000
Jan. 1, 2019 National Research Council $48,200
Jun. 1, 2019 National Research Council $150,000
Apr. 1, 2020 National Research Council $152,460

According to the NSERC listings, Bluink was involved in a 2013 project for a Algorithmic approach to dynamic scheduling, which netted a $22,500 grant. Another one was in 2016, worth $25,000 for child Login Research using FIDO public key authentication.

So, this has actually been in the works for about a decade. The average person probably had no idea that this was going on. Now, who was pushing for vaccine certification at the Federal level?

One lobbyist for Bluink was Lindsay Stevens. Several years back, she was a “Government Affairs Intern” with Johnson & Johnson (who makes vaccines in Canada). The next year she became a legislative assist at Queen’s Park. Interesting career trajectory. Another is Adam Yahn, who has ties to both the Ontario Conservatives, and to the Federal Party. Katlyn Harrison worked briefly as a Parliamentary Assistant before going into lobbying. All are employed by the firm Summa Strategies.

Summa is Chaired by Tim Powers, long time Conservative Party of Canada operative and talking head on the Canadian news.

It has been derided as an insane conspiracy theory that this “pandemic” is being used to bring about societal change, including digital ID. On the other hand, that appear to be exactly where this is heading. And Bluink will be in a position to deliver a combined system soon, if it can’t already.

Attaching vaccine status to something like a driver’s license will make it an actual movement license (credit to RoadToSerfdom), and not just a moniker. Haven’t taken your shots — and boosters — just yet? You won’t be allowed to leave your zone. Considering that Transport Canada is also involved, this isn’t hyperbole.

When Provinces decide that there will no longer be physical service cards, or when Ottawa phases out passports, what will be used to fill the void? S.I.N. card (the white plastic ones) stopped getting produced years ago. This is just an expansion of that idea.

Worth a reminder: The Vaccine Credential Initiative includes the Ontario Ministry of Health. It’s quite possible that this is where it will be launched first.

Bluink themselves explain how their technology works. Tying a medical record to it wouldn’t be a stretch.

(1) https://lobbycanada.gc.ca/app/secure/ocl/lrs/do/vwRg?cno=370321&regId=917076
(2) https://bluink.ca/about
(3) https://bluink.ca/eid-me/id-documents
(4) https://apps.cra-arc.gc.ca/ebci/hacc/cews/srch/pub/bscSrch
(5) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/
(6) https://www.nserc-crsng.gc.ca/ase-oro/Results-Resultats_eng.asp
(7) https://www.linkedin.com/in/lindsay-e-stevens/
(8) Lindsay Stevens LinkedIn Profile
(9) https://www.linkedin.com/in/adam-yahn-79a98446/
(10) Adam Yahn LinkedIn Profile
(11) https://www.linkedin.com/in/kate-harrison-a1a61822/
(12) Kate Harrison LinkedIn Profile
(13) https://summastrategies.ca/about/team/
(14) https://twitter.com/roadtoserfdom3/status/1378893370421043204
(15) https://canucklaw.ca/vaccine-credential-initiative-passports-digital-health-passes-ontario-ford/
(16) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-8IMLBW2N4k

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