London Hit-And-Run: Heinous Crime, Or Well Funded Anti-Racism Psy-Op?

Around this time last year, we had the George Floyd racism psy-op. Trudeau took part in protests, despite making a complete mockery of the CV psy-op. Understandably, a lot of people were confused by this. Even Theresa Tam supported such protests, as long as people wore masks. How things change.

The novel coronavirus is responsible for destroying economies everywhere (we are told), but as long as woke causes are being protested, it stays away. How considerate.

Now, in the wake of 4 people being killed in London, ON, Doug Ford and Justin Trudeau have apparently both showed up to a crowded vigil. This comes in the middle of (what they call) the 3rd wave of a deadly pandemic. However, people are not dropping dead.

Conservative Party Leader Erin O’Toole also saw fit to attend this memorial.

Disclaimer: while there is a lot that still needs to be shared publicly, everything about this incident so far seems to be off. That said, things could actually be exactly as they reported.

CBC staff typically go out of their way to avoid mentioning details about the background of a suspect in a crime. However, that isn’t the case here.

Doug Ford has imposed what are possibly the greatest restrictions to civil rights anywhere in North America. However, he’s quite fine with making exceptions to gatherings when it comes to a public memorial and condemnation of white supremacy and white violence.

Apparently, the deadliest virus in history is respectful enough not to attack helpless people at such vigils. That is one smart virus.

Now, this is giving some strange vibes. What could possibly be causing doubt of the official narrative?

Remember this? A few years back, an 11 year old girl and her 8 year old brother staged a hate crime. Who comes up with such an idea for a hoax? This was perpetuated in the media long after it had been exposed as a hoax, in order to drum up racial tensions in Canada.

ORGANIZATION YEAR AMOUNT
Acte D’Amour Mar. 1, 2021 $12,000
Afro-Canadian Caribbean Society Of Hamilton Mar. 26, 2021 $30,000
Angels of Hope Against Human Trafficking Mar. 3, 2021 $196,880
Aroha Fine Arts Apr. 9, 2021 $10,500
Association Francophone De Brooks Feb. 20, 2021 $6,200
Bluff Productions Mar. 1, 2021 $7,500
Calgary Police Service Mar. 23, 2021 $18,200
Canadian Council Of Business Leaders Against Systemic Anti-Black Racism Mar. 30, 2021 $10,000
Canadian Society For Yad Vashem Apr. 8, 2021 $10,000
Carrefour Communautaire Franophone De London Feb. 25, 2021 $34,000
Carrefour Jeunesse Emploi De Cote Des Neiges Feb. 1, 2021 $10,000
Centre Francophone De Toronto Mar. 6, 2021 $30,000
Compagnie Theatre Creole Apr. 1, 2021 $10,000
Cumberland African Nova Scotian Association Feb. 25, 2021 $34,000
Ethnik Festivals Association Feb. 20, 2021 $19,000
Francophones For Sustainable Environment Feb. 26, 2021 $17,610
Hot Doc’s Apr. 29, 2021 $25,000
Inter-Cultural Association of Greater Victoria Mar. 30, 2021 $19,800
Legacy Of Hope Foundation Apr. 1, 2021 $96,000
Legal Assistance Of Windsor Mar. 1, 2021 $269,709
Maybellearts Apr. 1, 2021 $10,000
Multicultural Health Broker’s Init. Apr. 1, 2021 $303,000
Nigerian Canadians for Cultural, Educational & Economic Progress Mar. 9, 2021 $25,000
Oromocto Special Care Home Mar. 31, 2021 $7,771
Overture With The Arts Feb. 1, 2021 $18,000
Overture With The Arts Feb. 1, 2021 $6,000
Overture With The Arts Feb. 1, 2021 $5,800
Regina Open Door Society Feb. 1, 2021 $1,690
Réseau d’action pour l’égalité des femmes immigrées et racisées du Québec Apr. 1, 2021 $453,746
Shoe Project (The) Mar. 7, 2021 $30,218
Silk Road Institute Mar. 1, 2021 $14,000
Skills For Change Of Metro Toronto Mar. 9, 2021 $30,000
Toronto Black Film Festival Mar. 11, 2021 $29,347
Vues D’Afrique Apr. 1, 2021 $25,000

A lot of taxpayer money is being spent to reinforce the idea that Canadians are racist. Of course, as long as such money is forthcoming, the problem is unlikely to disappear.

Keep in mind, these are only some of the recent grants provided by the Federal Government. Provinces and Municipalities are almost certainly kicking in large amounts of money as well.

As if on cue, Trudeau is pledging to fight “far right” groups, which is essentially anyone he ideologically disagrees with. How convenient this anti-Muslim attack gave him an excuse to go after such groups.

Waight told the news conference it wasn’t certain if the accused was affiliated with any specific hate group.

Never mind that this person isn’t alleged to be part of any hate group, but why should that get in the way of a good story? Perhaps there will a corresponding crack down on free speech to prevent the radicalization of such people in the future.

The Nova Scotia mass shooting in 2020 was used as an excuse to do a mass gun ban. It seems likely that this will be used for similar purposes.

(1) https://twitter.com/CBCAlerts/status/1401981291784986636
(2) https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/london/muslim-family-hit-run-targeted-1.6056238
(3) https://globalnews.ca/news/7930493/premier-doug-ford-london-attack-statement/
(4) https://torontosun.com/news/local-news/hijab-attack-claim-a-hoax-toronto-cops
(5) https://twitter.com/CPHO_Canada/status/1267623514258976768
(6) https://twitter.com/CPHO_Canada/status/1267623515311747076
(7) https://twitter.com/CPHO_Canada/status/1267623516389736455
(8) https://twitter.com/CPHO_Canada/status/1267623517362814976
(9) https://twitter.com/680NEWS/status/1402413060808118274
(10) https://twitter.com/erinotoole/status/1402434857301692425
(11) https://www.yahoo.com/entertainment/canada-act-dismantle-far-groups-144551326.html
(12) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/
(13) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/?sort=agreement_start_date_s%20desc&page=1&search_text=racism

Laurentian Swamp: Soliman; Heenan Blaikie; Desmarais; Canada-China Business Council; O’Toole; Harper; IDU

Nothing screams loyalty to Canada like being the Chief of Staff for a major Canadian political party, and also being honoured as a “United Nations Global Citizen”.

1. Important Links

Walied Soliman Honoured As UNA Global Citizen Laureate
Norton Rose Fulbright Profile For Walied Soliman
Walied Soliman, Director At Sick Kids Hospital Toronto
Walied Soliman Fundraising For Erin O’Toole
BlackNorth Initiative, An Actual Group
Norton Rose Fulbright Profile For Frederic Desmarais
Norton Rose Fulbright Profile For Martin Masse
McMillan & Biometrics For Employers
McMillan: Cannabis And Environmental Opportunity
Heenan Blaikie’s Sudden Collapse
Wikipedia On Heenan Blaikie Members
Century Initiative Directors And Staff
Canada-China Business Council Directors
CCBC Pushes Hard For Canada-China FIPA Deal
Earlier Review On China-Canada FIPA
Canada-China Business Council & Huawei
O’Toole Wants War Footing For Canada
O’Toole Adopts Globalist “Build Back Stronger” Variation
Stephen Harper – International Democratic Union
International Democratic Union — Members

2. Walied Soliman & His Many Roles

Walied Soliman is the Canadian chair of Norton Rose Fulbright. He is also co-chair of our Canadian special situations team, which encompasses Canada’s leading hostile and complex M&A, shareholder activism and complex reorganization transactions. He is widely regarded as one of the leading special situations practitioners in Canada. Over the past several years, Mr. Soliman has been involved in almost every major proxy battle in Canada, acting for both issuers and activists. In addition, his practice focuses on mergers and acquisitions, restructurings, financings, corporate governance and structured products.

Sought after for his depth of knowledge and experience, Mr. Soliman was appointed in February, 2020 by the government of Ontario to serve as chair of the Capital Markets Modernization Taskforce, whose mandate was to conduct a full review of the capital markets regulatory regime.

Mr. Soliman was the only lawyer recognized in the Globe and Mail’s Report on Business Magazine Power 50 list for 2017; was designated as a “Star Lawyer” by Acritas in 2017 for ranking in the top 28 lawyers globally (over 5,000 lawyers) as selected by a panel of over 3,000 senior in-house counsel; ranked as a leading Canadian corporate lawyer by both Chambers Canada and Lexpert Canada since 2016; named one of the 25 most influential lawyers in Canada by Canadian Lawyer magazine in 2014; ranked by Best Lawyers in Canada since 2013; and was ranked as one of the Top 40 Lawyers under 40 in Canada by L’expert magazine in 2009. Mr. Soliman sits on the board of the BlackNorth Initiative against anti-Black racism, and among other philanthropic endeavours, he is a board member of the Toronto SickKids Hospital Foundation.

The above quote is from Soliman’s biography in his profile with Norton Rose Fulbright. While holding a position as a corporate lawyer, he has many other roles. Some might see these as conflicts of interest. Soliman was also a campaign chair for Erin O’Toole, who now heads the Conservative Party of Canada. Soliman is also a Director at the Gates-funded Sick Kids Hospital Toronto.

Blacknorth is in fact a real group, and it’s job is to convince the Canadian public that there is systemic racism against black. This in spite of laws which HELP blacks in criminal court. Obviously, it’s nothing to so with average physical differences, or differences in culture. It must be racism perpetrated by whites. Directors also include Paul Desmarais III, and former Governor General David Johnston.

3. Biometric Identification Article

Side note: Martin Masse would also go on to work at the Desmarais controlled Montreal Economic Institute.

As biometric technologies become more sophisticated and accessible in the marketplace, employers doing business in Quebec are increasingly considering the opportunity to implement biometric identification systems. At first glance, these systems may appear convenient and cost-effective, and, in some circumstances, they indeed are. Unfortunately, convenience is not the decisive criterion to justify their implementation: necessity is that criterion. In addition, since the entry into force on November 1st, 2001 of the Act to Establish a Legal Framework for Information Technology (the ‘‘Act”), employers must comply with relatively burdensome formalities before proceeding with the implementation of such systems.

types of biometry
.
Physiological biometry is based on particular physical features which are unique and permanent for each person such as fingerprints, the form of hands and of the face, the iris and retina of an eye. On the other hand, behavioural biometry refers to the analysis of the behaviours of a person such as his signature, his voice or his keyboard typing habits.

the legal framework in Quebec
.
The implementation of biometric systems may raise concerns in connection with employees’ rights to the respect of their private life, integrity and dignity. Depending on the nature and use of the biometric characteristics or measurements recorded, certain practices may lead to discrimination claims. They also beg the question whether they infringe section 46 of the Quebec Charter of Human Rights and Freedoms which provides that: ‘‘Every person who works has a right, in accordance with the law, to fair and reasonable conditions of employment which have proper regard for his health, safety and physical well-being” (emphasis added).

Mathematical Representation Technology usually does not raise any human rights concerns since no images of employees’ fingerprints are stored. Furthermore, its underlying purpose is legitimate and work-related as it is generally implemented by employers wishing to increase the cost-efficiency and the accuracy of their working time attendance recording systems.

If nothing else, an interesting topic, although there would be some serious privacy issues. Of course, if refusing biometrics results in the loss of a job offer, it’s hardly voluntary. McMillan also has a very recent publication cannabis and waste as a “green opportunity”.

4. Heenan Blaikie (Now Defunct) Firm

For many years, Heenan Blaikie was perhaps the most prestigious law firm in Canada. However, it went under in February 2014, due largely to the greed of its members. However, there are some prominent names who were once part of the law firm. Several should be familiar. It seems that spending time at Heenan Blaikie is a stepping stone to greater things.

  • Michel Bastarache, Ex-Supreme Court Justice
  • André Bureau, Ex-Head of CRTC
  • Jean Chretien, Ex-Prime Minister
  • Oliver Desmarais, Vice-President at Power Corporation
  • Clement Gascon, Ex-Supreme Court Justice
  • Roy Heenan, Ex-Head of Trudeau Foundation
  • Pierre-Marc Johnson, Ex-Quebec Premier
  • Donald J. Johnston, Ex-Head of OECD
  • Erin O’Toole, Head of Conservative Party of Canada
  • David Stratas, Ex-Justice for Federal Court of Appeal
  • Pierre Trudeau, Ex-Prime Minister

5. Desmarais: Canada’s Political Family

If you aren’t familiar with the Desmarais Family and Power Corporation, see this earlier review on the subject. There are many tentacles in Canadian politics, and these are some of them.

  • Brian Mulroney, Ex-PM, was a lawyer for Power Corp.
  • Jean Chretien’s daughter married Andre Desmarais
  • Paul Martin worked for Power Corp., and received Canada Steamship Lines
  • Peter MacKay dated Paul Desmarais Jr’s daughter
  • Maxime Bernier worked for Montreal Economic Institute, headed by Helene Desmarais
  • Martin Masse worked for Montreal Economic Institute, headed by Helene Desmarais
  • Gary Doer, Ex-Manitoba Premier, sits on Power Corp’s Board of Directors
  • John Rae, Brother of Bob Rae, worked for Power Corp.
  • Pierre Beaudoin, Bombardier Chair, is also a Power Corp Director

Also noteworthy is that Andre Desmarais and Linda Koch Lorimer sit on the Trilateral Commission, along with many Canadian politicians. Desmarais is also part of the Century Initiative.

6. Canada-China Business Council

CCBC members include some of the largest and best-known Canadian and Chinese firms, as well as small to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), entrepreneurs, and non-profit organizations. Members represent a wide range of sectors, including education, financial services, professional services, manufacturing, construction, transportation, oil and gas, natural resources, ICT, and public sector.

Essentially, this is a coalition of parties (many of whom have political ties), committed to commercial trade and relations with China. However, these relations may not be in Canada’s best interests.

Olivier Desmarais, Chair
Senior Vice-President
Power Corporation and Power Financial

Graham Shantz, President

The Honourable Scott Brison, P.C., Vice-Chair
Vice Chair
BMO Capital Markets

The Honourable Martin Cauchon, P.C., LL.M., ICD.D, Ad. E., Vice-Chair
Counsel, DS Lawyers Canada LLP

David T. Fung, B.Eng., M. Eng., Ph.D., PEng (BC), C. Dir., A.C.C., H.R.C.C.C., LL.D. (Hon.), D.Sc. (Hon.), Vice-Chair
CEO
ACDEG International Inc.

Paul Blom
Executive Director
British Columbia First Nations Energy and Mining Council

Sam Boutziouvis
Vice-President, Government Relations
SNC-Lavalin Inc.

Morgan Elliott
Vice President, Government Affairs
Huawei Canada

Vivi Hou
President & CEO
Power Pacific Corporation Limited

Joyce Lee
Partner and Chair of Asia Group
McCarthy Tétrault LLP

The Honourable James Moore
Senior Business Advisor
Dentons

Nicole Changwen NIE
President and CEO
Industrial and Commercial Bank of China (Canada)

Ferio Pugliese
Senior Vice President, Air Canada Express and Government Relations
Air Canada

Pierre Seïn Pyun
Vice President, Government Affairs
Bombardier Inc

And of course:
-Paul Desmarais Sr.
-Andre Desmarais (son-in-law of Jean Chretien)

7. CCBC Pushed Hard For Chinese FIPA

The Canada-China Business Council was one of the organizations pushing hard for FIPA, the Foreign Investment Promotion and Protection Agreement between Canada and China. See the earlier review. This CCBC is bipartisan, and is made up of both Liberals and Conservatives. In fact, the Conservative Party of Canada was key in selling out to China, but now tells the public they will stand up for Canada.

James Moore, of course, sits on the CCBC, and was a major proponent of FIPA. Erin O’Toole (now head of the CPC), lobbied hard for FIPA when he was a Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Foreign Trade.

8. Canada-China Business Council & Huawei

Business between Canada and China doesn’t happen in a closed corridor. Two most important factors that impact bilateral business are US-China relations and heightened technology competition. Our Fall 2020 Distinguished Speakers Series takes on these issues, featuring speakers who shine a spotlight on topics such as media coverage of China, 5G and Huawei, industrial espionage, data security, and AI.
.
Huawei Canada Demystified
September 24, 2020
9:00 am – 10:00 am ET

With everything going on, sure, let’s focus on this. Surely China is just being misunderstood in the Western media. Interesting that the people held hostage wasn’t listed.

9. CANZUK, Open Borders, Erin O’Toole

CANZUK was addressed here, here, and here. It was initially adopted in 2018, when Andrew Scheer was leader. Now, Erin O’Toole seems to be an even stronger enthusiast. In short, this open borders scheme will let in “more and more countries” as time passes. O’Toole previously pitched it as opportunity. Now, he refers to it as a necessity to counterbalance China.

It’s strange that O’Toole hasn’t seem to lost his desire for open borders, even as he calls for Canada to invoke the Emergencies Act, and adopt a war footing. He also adopts a version of the “Build Back Better” slogan.

10. Harper: International Democratic Union

Having regard to their common convictions that democratic societies provide individuals throughout the world with the best conditions for political liberty, personal freedom, equality of opportunity and economic development under the rule of law; and therefore

Being committed to advancing the social and political values on which democratic societies are founded, including the basic personal freedoms and human rights, as defined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights; in particular, the right of free speech, organisation, assembly and non-violent dissent; the right to free elections and the freedom to organise effective parliamentary opposition to government; the right to a free and independent media; the right to religious belief; equality before the law; and individual opportunity and prosperity;

Having regard to their common beliefs in an open society, where power is dispersed widely amongst free institutions, dedicated to creating conditions that will enable each individual to reach his full potential and to carry out his responsibilities to his fellow man; and where the central task of government is to serve the individual and to safeguard and promote individual freedom; and equally

Stressing the moral commitments of a free and open society, supporting the institution of the family as its fundamental social and cohesive force, as well as social responsibility towards the weak and less fortunate, particularly by encouraging self-help and individual enterprise and choice in the provision of services;

Being dedicated to a society of individuals working together in partnership for the common good;

All of this course seems perfectly fine and normal. However, this is an effort to build toward a world government, much like the proposed United Nations Parliamentary Assembly.

The Conservative Party of Canada is also listed as a member in the IDU. So are the Conservative Party in the UK, and the Republican Party in the U.S. Do the Party members know about this?

Of course, if you ask Maxime Bernier about his own involvement in promoting the UNPA, he will go full-Rempel and block you on Twitter. As for some of IDU’s members:

The Right Honourable Stephen Harper
Conservative Party, Canada

Brian Loughnane
Liberal Party, Australia

Lord Ashcroft KCMG, PC
United Kingdom

Marco Solares
Partido Unionista, Guatemala

Christopher J. Fussner
Republican Party, USA

Dr. Kizza Besigye
Forum for Democratic Change, Uganda

The Honourable Reinhold Bocklet
Christian Social Union, Germany

José Carlos Aleluia
Democratas, Brasil

Oscar Ortiz
Movimento Democrata Social, Bolivia

11. The Laurentian Swamp Runs Canada

This is hardly an exhaustive account, but know that there is a group of people who run Canada for themselves, to the detriment of the public. They control all major parties, and much of the political agenda. As such, Canadians have no real representation in Government.

Thoughts On The “Conservative Inc.” National Debate

1. Overall Impression

Just let it implode.

That’s the reaction I got from watching the CPC debate. Real issues were shoved aside in favour of extremely superficial discussion. Granted, political debates are rarely meant to be engaging and in depth, and this was no exception.

This could be easily forgiven if official platforms and discussions were in depth on the important matters. However, that doesn’t appear to be the case.

If this group represents the future of the Conservative Party of Canada, then it’s probably best to just let the party collapse, and focus on other alternatives. It is every bit as globalist as the Liberal Party, and meaningful differences are few and far between.

2. Border Security & Enforcement

While Conservatives used to brag about how they would close the loophole in the Safe Third Country Agreement, that talking point seems to have dropped from their agendas. True, the agreement was modified, but many of the same issues still exist.

Of course they don’t mentioned that they never implemented a proper entry/exit system either, despite a recent decade in power. They never brought up that S3CA was drafted in such a way that the United Nations was a party to it, and consultations were required. They didn’t ever address the NGOs (many Jewish) who have been fighting in court for decades to keep the Canada/U.S. border open. Conservatives also downplayed the expediting of work permits to illegals, and amnesty for illegals.

It would be nice for conservatives to address abominations like Sanctuary Cities, which encourage and reward people for being in the country illegally. However, few seem to care.

In fact, conservatives have been, and remain, complicit, in ensuring that there isn’t any real border security in Canada. Closing the Safe 3rd Country Agreement is just a tiny piece of it. There is silence on so much else.

3. True Scale Of Immigration Into Canada

This has been brought up repeatedly on this site, but the “official” immigration numbers in no way reflect the number of people actually entering Canada with some pathway to stay longer. Each year, hundreds of thousands of students and “temporary” workers enter Canada. But this is noticeably absent from the discussion. Remittances drain our national coffers, pilot programs are varied and numerous, immigration is pushed even during times of high unemployment, and rich people can simply purchase a pathway to permanent residence. These are just a few examples of the mess that is the Canadian immigration system.

This also should be noted: every year thousands of “inadmissibles” are denied entry originally, but then allowed in LEGALLY anyway. What’s even the point?

This also ties back to the last section. Since Canada doesn’t actually have a proper entry/exit system in place, how can he ensure that students and temporary workers, (and the inadmissibles) are actually leaving the country afterwards?

Sloan (to his credit), made a few vague references to reducing immigration, but has never addressed the true size of the problem.

4. Lack Of Transparency On CANZUK

O’Toole repeatedly brought up CANZUK as a free trade agreement between Canada, Australia, New Zealand and the United Kingdom. What he left out was that CANZUK also has a free movement provision, which allows citizens to freely move between countries. O’Toole deliberately omits as well that he fully intends to expand CANZUK to other nations as well. Watch 2:00 in the video.

5. Continued Population Replacement

(Page 18 of the 2004 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 24 of the 2005 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 18, 19 of the 2006 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 19, 20 of the 2007 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 21, 22 of the 2008 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 16 of the 2009 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 14 of the 2010 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 18 of the 2011 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 15 of the 2012 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 19 of the 2013 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 16 of the 2014 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 16 of the 2015 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 10 of the 2016 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 14 of the 2017 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 28 of the 2018 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 36 of the 2019 Annual Report to Parliament)

This is by no means everyone entering Canada, but does demonstrate a point. In recent decades, immigration to Canada has overwhelmingly been from the 3rd world. This has resulted in irreversible demographic changes, to balkanization, and to a society where many feel no need to integrate.

Instead of addressing this, the candidates all cucked hard at the issue of “systemic racism. Instead of calling out the farce being played out live, they all submitted. Candidates all, to various degrees, played along with the horrors that people of colour experience on a daily basis.

Never mind that the only group that it’s legal to discriminate against is whites. In particular this means white men. This display was truly revolting to watch.

6. Silence On “Gladue Rights” Hypocrisy

If conservatives really wanted to address inequality in the criminal justice system, they could have brought up “Gladue rights”, which entrench special rights and considerations for Aboriginals and blacks. This abomination has been upheld as legal by the Supreme Court of Canada, and is now commonplace in criminal courts. Yes, we actually have race-based-discounts in criminal courts, even in sentencing. If this isn’t systematic racism, then what is?

Critics have claimed this is necessary, given the overrepresentation in prisons. While there is overrepresentation, these same critics try to avoid the key issue: CRIME RATES. They will look to any other reason to explain this disparity, other than actual criminal behaviour.

It was Gladue rights that allowed Terri McClintic to go to a healing lodge, for a brief period at least. This has been the law since the 1990s, but yet no one in power talks about that systemic racism.

7. International Banking Cartel

While Conservatives do whine about the debt, they deliberately avoid discussing WHY the situation is so bad. Specifically, since 1974, Canada has been borrowing primarily from private sources. Money is always artificially created, but when it’s owed to – say the Bank of Canada – the debt stays in Canadian hands. It can be paid off or cancelled at any time. Not the case when it is private institutions doing this.

In fact, over 90% of Canada’s national debt has been from accumulated interest. Liberals and Conservatives alike play along with this fraud, ensuring the balance grows.

Canada currently owes about 30% to foreign interests, which give them great leverage over us. Despite vague talking points, supporters have never been able to explain how private loans reduce inflation, and even if true, why this is better than simply using the Bank of Canada. Worse, Conservatives were in power when this was challenged in court by COMER, so they can’t claim ignorance on the issue.

Fiscal conservatives will always focus on a symptom (the debt), and not on the disease (the international banking cartel). They are complicit in helping this scheme along.

8. Silence On Climate Change Scam

I can’t even be happy about the approach here, and this is why. It’s another case of the Conservatives focusing on symptoms (Paris Accord, Carbon tax), while ignoring the underlying disease (the climate change industry). The candidates repeatedly say that the Carbon tax is an ineffective means for implementing a climate plan. The point to Provincial court challenges, while omitting that they are really just a form of controlled opposition.

The problem is that the entire climate change industry is built on lies and deception. Carbon Dioxide is plant food, and playing along with this hoax does not serve Canadians’ interests in the slightest. Broadly speaking, money which Western nations provide (with debt of course), are used for climate bonds, and predatory loans to the 3rd world.

None of this benefits Canadians, nor helps the environment in any way. Yet conservatives are quite willing to play along with the agenda, even if they claim to oppose the Carbon tax.

9. Support For Internationalist Agenda

Throughout the “debate”, candidates were criticizing Trudeau for how he handles affairs internationally.

Problem is, they criticize his handing of it only. They have no problem with the agendas themselves. Conservatives have no issue with being in bed with the U.N., or groups like the Trilateral Commission, the Bank for International Settlements, the World Trade Organization, CANZUK, or supporting agreements like the USMCA or the Trans-Pacific Partnership.

To reiterate: conservatives are only being critical for how Trudeau handles the globalism agenda. They have no problem with the agenda itself.

10. Two-Faced On Trade Protectionism

This was amusing to see the mental gymnastics at play. The Conservatives support the globalized trade agenda: NAFTA; (it’s successor USMCA); CANZUK; Trans-Pacific Partnership; FIPA, and countless more deals.

Problem is, as long as a part supports the offshoring agenda, they will never believe in protectionist policies. While all candidates gave lip service to wanting to be self sufficient, the reality is that they don’t. Keeping control over the production of essential goods necessitates protectionist policies — and an anti-free trade mentality. Conservative policies over the years have directly contributed to the dependence on foreign powers that are hostile to us.

11. Social Conservatives Thrown Under Bus

There was some talk from all candidates about the need for a “bigger tent”, and for bringing social conservatives in.

The problem is: there’s no sincerity behind this movement. Social conservatives are nothing more than a voting base to be tapped into. This party supports diversity, multiculturalism, gay “marriage”, the gender agenda, widespread abortion, and other non-traditional beliefs. In fact, the more diverse a country becomes, the less there is to conserve socially.

Read between the lines here. Soc-Cons are to be used as a vote supplement, nothing more.

12. Shift From Identity To “Values”

A major problem with conservatives is that they don’t believe that national identity is worth protecting. Whether it be demographics, culture, language, heritage, customs, traditions, religion, etc… As such, they don’t make any effort (other than platitudes), to preserve the makeup of the country.

Instead, they go with the much more vague and malleable notion of “values”. These are simply ideas that can be changed or watered down to suit political purposes.

13. Miscellaneous Points To Add

(Peter Mackay pledges – in writing – no merger with Alliance if he wins)

(Peter MacKay sticking the knife in again?)

MacKay has been around for a long time, and was involved in Harper’s globalist agenda all along. He and Maxime Bernier helped with the 2007 endorsement of the UN Parliamentary Assembly vote. There’s also his history of stabbing his colleagues in the back, from David Orchard to Andrew Scheer. MacKay is also connected to the Desmarais family, having previously dated Paul Desmarais Jr.’s daughter.

Aside from pandering constantly, O’Toole has tweeted out that he is a shill for foreign interests, or one in particular. Makes ones reasonably question his loyalty and commitment to Canada. Also noteworthy is that he spent a few years at the (now defunct) law firm of Heenan Blaikie. This is the same firm Jean Chretien and Pierre Trudeau worked at. It had also been infiltrated heavily by the Desmarais Family.


Leslyn.Lewis.PhD.dissertation

Dr. Lewis graduated magna cum laude from the University of Toronto (Trinity College). Thereafter, she obtained a Juris Doctorate from Osgoode Hall Law School, a Masters in Environmental Studies from York University, with a Concentration in Business and the Environment from the Schulich School of Business, and completed a PhD from Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. Dr. Lewis is the Managing Partner of Lewis Law Professional Corporation and has developed a specialized commercial litigation and international contract trade practice which focuses on energy policy. She has two decades of strong litigation experience beginning with some of the strongest Bay Street law firms, prior to starting this firm. She has published numerous articles in peer reviewed journals on international law, contracts, climate change and the feed-in-tariff system in renewable energy projects. Her local practice focuses on corporate commercial, real estate and estates, while her international practice is concentrated in the area of cross-border services including immigration, energy law.

While career politicians are distasteful as a rule, Leslyn seems to have come out of nowhere. She finished her PhD dissertation in 2019, at the age of 48. She seems professionally invested in the climate change scam and to have a globalist/internationalist mindset. Not sure this is the best choice for a party that desperately needs to ditch its globalist ties.

14. Forced VS Optional Vaccines

It was nice to hear the candidates say that no vaccines would ever be forced on Canadians — an obvious reference to the CV planned-emic. However, a point has to be made about that.

WHY are they so okay with vaccines in the first place? Given the deception and lies behind the reporting and the overblown nature, why aren’t they questioning the vaxx agenda itself? Why aren’t they questioning the rampant lobbying and conflict of interest here? Instead, the “opposition” seems limited as to whether vaccines should be made mandatory.

15. Just Let It Implode

This is some random tweet referring to the Republican Party in the United States. However, the exact same reasoning applies to “conservative” parties in Canada. They co-opt and corrupt nationalist and populist movements in order to incorporate (or appear to incorporate) them into their platform.

The result is that an extremely watered down — or non-existent — version of populist sentiment gets put into the mainstream. This is where puppet journalists obediently parrot the talking points and deceive the public.

The Conservative Party of Canada is not worth saving, or reforming, or overhauling. It needs to die. With it out of the way, more nationalist leaning alternatives can flourish and grow.

Media #12: A Rebuke To Shanifa Nasser, And Her Article On Defunding Toronto Police

1. Media Bias, Lies, Omissions And Corruption

CLICK HERE, for #1: Unifor in bed with Federal Gov’t
CLICK HERE, for #2: Global News’ selective truth on TRP granted.
CLICK HERE, for #3: Post Media owning most Canadian media.
CLICK HERE, for #4: conservative content dominated by Koch/Atlas.
CLICK HERE, for #5: origins of Malcolm’s “charity” True North Canada.
CLICK HERE, for #6: the people running the Post Millennial.
CLICK HERE, for #7: how to do research, investigative journalism.
CLICK HERE, for #8: Koch/Atlas both sides, AB court challenge.
CLICK HERE, for #9: picking up on predictive programming.
CLICK HERE, for #10: Trudeau Foundation & media embeds.
CLICK HERE, for #11: Trudeau swapped out for body double?

2. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for Shanifa Nasser’s article on defunding police.
http://archive.is/wip/S7wCa
CLICK HERE, for Shanifa Nasser’s LinkedIn profile.
http://archive.is/lb5vB
CLICK HERE, for Focus Humanitarian Assistance info.
http://archive.is/sEXRb
CLICK HERE, for Daily Mail on Floyd arrest record.
http://archive.is/7gmPo
CLICK HERE, for Table 43, FBI 2018 crime stats.
http://archive.is/8NuV1
CLICK HERE, for Floyd & Chauvin knew each other.
http://archive.is/GAYBB
CLICK HERE, for Floyd riots being coordinated.
http://archive.is/nGukb
CLICK HERE, for Tam supports groups for protesting.

https://apps.irs.gov/app/eos/
EIN: 52-1937154

3. Quotes From Article

But as protests over police brutality and racism erupt across the United States and beyond, sparked by the case of George Floyd — an unarmed black man whose final moments were spent with an officer’s knee pressed into his neck — one refrain is growing louder and louder: “Defund the police.”

Exactly what that means can differ somewhat depending on who you ask. While some have called for an outright abolition of police forces, many others favour reducing police budgets so that their work focuses more squarely on violent crime. But the sentiments behind it stem from a singular question when it comes to dealing with people in mental distress:

“Is that armed, highly-paid officer the right resource for that function?” asked Alok Mukherjee, who spent a decade as the chair of the Toronto Police Services Board.

In Toronto, the police service is the single-biggest line item in the city’s $13.5-billion operating budget. Out of an average property tax bill of $3,020, the largest share — about $700 — is allocated to police. That’s followed by about $520 for transit. Shelters and housing take up about $150, while about $60 goes to paramedic services.

“We’ve seen a proliferation of gang-intervention and prevention programs that include funding for the police … rather than simply providing after-school services, education services, extracurricular activities and sports activities for young people in disadvantaged neighbourhoods,” he said.

In true CBC fashion, the article doesn’t actually pose a concrete solution. Instead, it meanders, not really focusing on a coherent argument.

However, the more interesting questions are: Who is this author? What is her agenda in writing it? Why is she pushing this topic? What is her background?

4. Looking At Shanifa Nasser’s Twitter Feed

Tasser’s Twitter feed is filled with race-bait and race-hustling content. It’s clearly a large part of the content that she covers, and she seems to buy into the narrative of systemic racism in Canada. But what else is known about her?

Her biography has her taking religious studies — Islam specifically — from 2004 to 2011. Presumably her work with Focus Humanitarian Assistance was part time. While she thinks that white supremacy and racism in the West are big problems, she sees nothing wrong with fundraising from those same people in order to fund projects in the 3rd World.

5. Focus Humanitarian Assistance

Since our inception in 1995, Focus Humanitarian Assistance USA (FOCUS USA) has been serving vulnerable communities throughout Central and South Asia in the aftermath of devastating natural disasters. We are also committed to fostering and building disaster-resilient communities in susceptible areas—including areas in the United States—by developing disaster risk mitigation programs to minimize impact and better prepare families and individuals before environmental disasters such as winter storms, hurricanes or earthquakes strike.

Our mission is: to save lives, reduce suffering and create resilience in communities prone to man-made or natural disasters.

As an affiliate of the Aga Khan Development Network (AKDN), FOCUS collaborates closely with several of its branches. FOCUS also works with a number of other like-minded agencies and donor partners. These include partner government and government agencies, NGOs, as well as corporations that share an interest in the effort to provide relief and support services during and following natural and man-made disasters.

Shanifa Nasser’s LinkedIn page states that she held 2 different roles in Focus Humanitarian Assistance form 2010 to 2013. According to its biography, FHA was founded in 1994 by Aga Khan, and operates globally for disaster relief.

fostrian.children.1.patent.letters.
fostrian.children.2.organization.bylaws

A point of clarification though: according to records with Revenue Canada, Focus Humanitarian Assistance (at least the charity itself), was founded in 1981. It was originally named the Fostrian Children Universal Society. Three members, Zainel Mohamed, Nurjehan Bharmal, and Haider Merchant were the first directors of the group. It was taken over by Aga Khan and renamed in 1994.

focus.humanitarian.1.articles.of.continuance
focus.humanitarian.2.change.of.address
focus.humanitarian.3.director.changes

2015 Canada Revenue Agency Financial Information
Receipted donations $5,489,963.00 (69.42%)
Non-receipted donations $52,949.00 (0.67%)
Gifts from other registered charities $56,927.00 (0.72%)
Government funding $0.00 (0.00%)
All other revenue $2,308,926.00 (29.19%)
Total revenue: $7,908,765.00

Charitable programs $7,468,065.00 (92.36%)
Management and administration $423,607.00 (5.24%)
Fundraising $193,950.00 (2.40%)
Political activities $0.00 (0.00%)
Gifts to other registered charities and qualified donees $0.00 (0.00%)
Other $0.00 (0.00%)
Total expenses: $8,085,622.00

Compensation
Total compensation for all positions
$1,165,091.00

Full-time employees (14)
Part-time employees (3)

Professional and consulting fees
$144,480.00

Compensated full-time positions:
$1 to $39,999 (2)
$40,000 to $79,999 (9)
$80,000 to $119,999 (1)
$120,000 to $159,999 (1)
$160,000 to $199,999 (0)
$250,000 to $299,999 (1)

2016 Canada Revenue Agency Financial Information
Receipted donations $5,319,296.00 (83.26%)
Non-receipted donations $0.00 (0.00%)
Gifts from other registered charities $712,825.00 (11.16%)
Government funding $255,735.00 (4.00%)
All other revenue $100,925.00 (1.58%)
Total revenue: $6,388,781.00

Charitable programs $9,468,278.00 (93.78%)
Management and administration $416,922.00 (4.13%)
Fundraising $211,116.00 (2.09%)
Political activities $0.00 (0.00%)
Gifts to other registered charities and qualified donees $0.00 (0.00%)
Other $1.00 (0.00%)
Total expenses: $10,096,317.00

Compensation
Total compensation for all positions
$1,173,256.00

Full-time employees (11)
Part-time employees (1)

Professional and consulting fees
$342,875.00

Compensated full-time positions:
$40,000 to $79,999 (7)
$80,000 to $119,999 (1)
$120,000 to $159,999 (1)
$250,000 to $299,999 (1)

2017 Canada Revenue Agency Financial Information
Receipted donations $5,536,400.00 (74.59%)
Non-receipted donations $294,348.00 (3.97%)
Gifts from other registered charities $57,048.00 (0.77%)
Government funding $0.00 (0.00%)
All other revenue $1,534,522.00 (20.67%)
Total revenue: $7,422,318.00

Charitable programs $7,474,628.00 (92.30%)
Management and administration $494,142.00 (6.10%)
Fundraising $129,694.00 (1.60%)
Political activities $0.00 (0.00%)
Gifts to other registered charities and qualified donees $0.00 (0.00%)
Other $0.00 (0.00%)
Total expenses: $8,098,464.00

Compensation
Total compensation for all positions
$1,390,227.00

Full-time employees (14)
Part-time employees (4)
Professional and consulting fees
$105,665.00

Compensated full-time positions:
$1 to $39,999 (1)
$40,000 to $79,999 (8)
$80,000 to $119,999 (2)
$120,000 to $159,999 (1)
$200,000 to $249,999 (1)

Focus Humanitarian Assistance (which is part of the Aga Khan Development Network), takes in several million dollars per year and states that it is used for humanitarian purposes.

Nasser left the organization in 2013, after working as a project lead, and in donor relations. While the older tax information isn’t posted, recent years show it doing well at making money. That being said, it seems strange that it routinely seems to be spending more than it takes in.

It’s also odd that Nasser repeatedly touts the “systemic racism” narrative in Canada, but she has no issues with fundraising from those same people. In fact, there are so many people willing to donate that FHA is able to have many full time staff in its organization.

6. Munk School, Fellow Global Journalism

Designed to produce subject-specific journalists who craft beats around their areas of expertise or professional experience, this eight-month program allowed me to leverage my background in Islamic Studies to pitch and report on topics of relevance in Canadian media.

Nasser has also spent 5 years working for the CBC. With experience and credentials like this, what’s not to love? Why not embrace such a voice?

The problem is that this serious journalist has done nothing in the way of actual research. Let’s go through some of the ways that this article is not presenting the complete picture.

7. Gladue Rights Tilt Incarceration Rates

Gladue Rights not only apply to Aboriginals, but to blacks as well. Not many people know that.

Think of how bizarre this is. One or two groups of people commit crime at a much, MUCH higher rate than others, and are subsequently locked up in higher numbers. This is considered “systemic discrimination”, and the solution is to alter the laws to let them out of prison earlier.

Apparently, the prison population is supposed to reflect a random sample of society. It’s not supposed to reflect the group that commits serious crimes.

8. Black Crime Rate Is Much Higher

Just to use the 2018 data available from the FBI crime statistics, Table 43, let’s look at some numbers. This is information where the race of the criminal(s) was known. Keep in mind, that blacks make up 13% of the U.S. population. However, they commit:

  • 27% of all crime
  • 53% of murder, non-negligent manslaughter
  • 29% of rape
  • 54% of robbery
  • 34% of aggravated assault
  • 29% of all burglary
  • 32% of motor vehicle theft
  • 25% of arson
  • 29% of vandalism
  • 43% of weapons carrying
  • 39% prostitution, commercialised vice

Social justice types frequently complain about there being a much higher police presence in black communities, and there being more frequent interactions with police. While true, there is a valid reason for it: crime rates. Yet Nasser and those like her ignore the hard facts.

Interestingly, while there is hard data in crime rates and race in the U.S. and the U.K., very little information is available in Canada. This is likely to avoid having to publish the hard truths. Apologists point to the higher incarceration rates of certain groups, calling it “injustice”. Yet they tap dance around crime rates. Or when it is reluctantly admitted, rates are spun as a consequence of poverty of systemic racism.

8. FBI Data On Hate Crime Stats

According to the data on this page, 60% of single instance hate crimes were based on race/ethnicity. 54% of the offenders (where race was known) were white, and 26% were black.

Or take this data from 2015. The FBI reports that 500 whites were killed by blacks, while 229 blacks were killed by whites. This is more than a 2 to 1 ratio, just looking at the totals.

However, consider that blacks make up around 13% of the population, and whites 65%. Per capita, this works out to more than a 10 to 1 ration of interracial murder black/white that is done by blacks.

Of course these are just a small sample of the information that is available from official crime statistics. The author of the CBC article mentions none of this when talking about disbanding the police in Toronto. The narrative she helps perpetuate has nothing to do with hard numbers.

9. Floyd’s Arrest Record Was Public

This was reported over a week ago by the Daily Mail, but George Floyd had a lengthy arrest record for many serious charges. Of course, it doesn’t make it justified to kill him (I know), but puts things in a bit of a different light.

10. George Floyd Knew His Killer

George Floyd and the police officer involved with his death, Derek Chauvin, both worked security at the same Minneapolis club, according to the club owner.

“Chauvin was our off-duty police for almost the entirety of the 17 years that we were open,” Maya Santamaria, the former owner of El Nuevo Rodeo club in Minneapolis, which was sold months prior to the incident, told KSTP in an interview Thursday.

Floyd worked at the club for about a year, but Santamaria said he was one of 20 or 30 employees hired for security on the busiest nights in addition to off-duty police, and is not sure if the pair ever actually spoke to one another.

Newsweek reported that George Floyd and Derek Chauvin has worked at the same club in Minneapolis. Chauvin had been there (as a side job) for 17 years, while Floyd had been there for a year.

To be fair, the article does add the disclaimer that they may not have worked together directly. Still, knowing they were colleagues does make one rethink the entire situation. This death may have absolutely nothing to do with race. It could have just been an intentional murder for any number of reasons. Yet another detail not focused on by the CBC.

11. These Riots Are Being Coordinated

As riots continue to wreak havoc on cities across the country, officials have continued to point to “outside influencers,” along with anarchists and opportunists, who have hijacked the otherwise peaceful demonstrations against police brutality following the death of an African-American man, George Floyd, in Minneapolis last weekend.

According to multiple U.S. intelligence sources, law-enforcement officials in various departments nationwide and analysts monitoring the activity, the playbook in every city is almost the same: the peaceful protests are organized, and a point place is designated for people to gather in the daylight hours.

But, as the night falls and thousands go home, the looting and discord are ignited by a fresh round of people camouflaged with dark clothing and masks, armed with spray paint for graffiti and sometimes homemade weapons, and their nefarious behavior continues well into the early hours.

Although this article is too short to do the topic justice, it’s becoming evident that there is some real organization within the protests for George Floyd. Fox also has covered it, concluding as well that these riots are being carefully planned. There is nothing spontaneous or organic about this.

Bricks are (allegedly) being dropped off to locations so that they can be used to make a riot more destructive. Riots have been quickly assembled and coordinated globally. This is not simply restricted to the United States, as any quick search engine check can verify.

Some obvious questions: Who is coordinating the riots? Why are they doing it? What is the end-goal? How are they managing to put it all together?

But instead of asking the tough questions, mainstream media personalities are deflecting. Instead, they shift to topics like Should we abolish the police?

One also has to wonder what is going on when the official narrative on the coronavirus “pandemic” suddenly flips like this. In early 2020, we were told by the Government that the situation in China is no big deal and to get on with our lives. Starting in March, it was an emergency and severe measures had to be taken. Now, gathering in large groups to protest is no big deal, just don’t yell.

12. Systemic Racism Narrative Pushed

Any online search will uncover a host of material saying that in the wake up George Floyd’s death, racism must be stamped out. In particular, the narrative that white supremacy caused it is being thrown in our faces.

The fact that all four police officers were of difference ethnicities (quite the diverse squad), seems irrelevant in this narrative. The media keeps pushing the claim that white racism is responsible for the death.

Obvious question where: WHY is this narrative being pushed? Why aren’t questions such as the Floyd/Chauvin relationship being explored in greater detail? How did George Floyd really die? Why isn’t there more in depth research going on into the planning and coordination of these global riots? Who is financing these riots, and what is their interest? Why aren’t people in the media asking about the anti-white push (unless they are the ones pushing it)?

These are just some of the hard questions that need to be asked. But “journalists” like Shanifa Nasser are not doing that. Instead, they try to divert to other issues, like abolishing or at least downsizing the police.

Gladue 2.0: Blacks Also Get Race-Based Discount In Sentencing, What The Media Missed

1. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for race-based discounts in criminal court.
CLICK HERE, for Terri McClintic going to a healing lodge.
CLICK HERE, for proposal to scrap Gladue Rights entirely.

CLICK HERE, for Canadian Charter.

Aboriginal Specific Cases
(A) R. v. Gladue, 1997 CanLII 3015 (BC CA)
http://archive.is/QKazg
(B) R. v. Gladue, 1999 CanLII 679 (SCC), [1999] 1 SCR 688
http://archive.is/vSWlo
(C) R. v. Ipeelee, 2012 SCC 13 (CanLII), [2012] 1 SCR 433
http://archive.is/Ol7tw

2. Context For This Article

Much of the Canadian public knows about “Gladue Rights”, which is essentially a race-based discount given to Aboriginal defendants in criminal proceedings. In short, judges must consider systemic racism and other discrimination, and search for ways to reduce their sentences.

However, this does not extend only to Aboriginals. Blacks can also use many of the same excuses in pleading for reduced punishment for crimes they commit.

Everyone, regardless of their race, should be against this. The only way a society works is when everyone is treated the same way for their actions. One group should not benefit, or be hindered by unequal laws.

3. Court Cases For Blacks

Here are some recent court cases in which “racial discrimination” or “system racism” was taken into account by judges sentencing black felons. This is not the complete list.

(A) R. v. Borde, 2003 CanLII 4187 (ON CA)
http://archive.is/xfD1s
(B) R v Reid, 2016 ONSC 954 (CanLII)
http://archive.is/QgCtC
(C) R. v. Diabikulu, 2016 BCPC 390 (CanLII)
http://archive.is/PNiAG
(D) R. v. Deng, 2017 BCPC 225 (CanLII)
http://archive.is/MwPKY
(E) R. v. Jackson, 2018 ONSC 2527 (CanLII)
http://archive.is/GGEDy
(F) R. v. Shallow, 2019 ONSC 403 (CanLII)
http://archive.is/Koklf
(G) R. v. Faulkner, 2019 NSPC 36 (CanLII)
http://archive.is/fW8hj
(H) R. v. Kabanga-Muanza, 2019 ONSC 1161 (CanLII)
http://archive.is/m36ac

Again, this is not nearly all of them, but a snapshot into what the legal system (it’s not really a justice system) has become in Canada.

4. Looking At A Cultural Assessment

[17] Cultural Assessment – Completed by Mr. R. Wright, MSW, RSW. It is extensive, well-informed and well-researched.
The Nature of an Impact of Race and Culture Assessment
Though much has been written about the intersection of race and the criminal justice system, and in particular the experience of North Americans of African descent, until the development of IRCA’s (sic) there had been no recognized form for the presentation of such a report. That people of African descent have been overrepresented among incarcerated persons in Canada has been studied by academics, justice system leaders, and activist persons. The Office of the Correctional Investigator took special notice of the conditions of inmates of African descent in federal correctional institutions in its year end report in 2013. It concluded:

“Black inmates are one of the fastest growing sub-populations in federal corrections. Over the last 10 years, the number of federal incarcerated Black inmates has increased by 80% from 778 to 1,403. Black inmates now account for 9.5% of the total prison population (up from 6.3% in 2003/04) while representing just 2.9% of the general Canadian population.” (p.8)

Now, 4 years after the advent of these reports in the well publicized YCJA matter described as R v. X, IRCAs have been widely accepted in Nova Scotia courts and have also been conducted in Ontario. Though I fully respect that the experience of aboriginal Canadians is quite unique, and I have no wish to expropriate or exploit their struggle and leadership, I nevertheless need to acknowledge that my development of IRCAs has been influenced by my familiarity with Gladue reports. Like Gladue reports, the goal of IRCAs is to provide courts with more background information about an offender’s race and cultural background to assist the court at arriving at a just sentence: A sentence that considers the circumstances of the offender, alternatives to incarceration, and does not further contribute to the systemic problems of overrepresentation of persons within correctional populations. This principle is generally stated in the Criminal Code of Canada with particular attention given to Aboriginal offenders:

718.2 A court that imposes a sentence shall also taken into consideration the following principles:
(e) all available sanctions, other than imprisonment, that are reasonable in the circumstances and consistent with the harm done to victims or to the community should be considered for all offenders, with particular attention to the circumstances of Aboriginal offenders.

In keeping with these principles, it is a founding premise of IRCAs that a person’s race and cultural heritage should be considered as a significant factor in considering their sentence n a criminal matter. Not just because of cultural responses to normal stressors, but also because of the forces of racism that person experience and our growing understanding of how this affects outcomes when one encounters the justice and other government systems. In Nova Scotia we have significant reason to understand these effects. We are the province of the Royal Commission on the Donald Marshall, Jr., Prosecution (1989), which opening paragraph is very telling:

The criminal justice system failed Donald Marshall, Jr. at virtually every turn from his arrest and wrongful conviction for murder in 1971 up to, and even beyond, his acquittal by the Court of Appeal in 1983. The tragedy of the failure is compounded by evidence that this miscarriage of justice could – and should – have been prevented, or at least corrected quickly, if those involved in the system had carried out their duties in a professional and/or competent manner. That they did not is due, in part at least, to the fact that Donald Marshall, Jr. is a Native. (p.1)

We are also the province of the Black Learners Advisory Committee Report on Education: Redressing Inequity – Empowering Black Learners (1994). This report was produced as part of a comprehensive study of the education inequities that exist for African Nova Scotians (ANS). It produced 3 volumes of materials and 30 recommendations for education reform. That systemic racism exists in the Nova Scotia education system was well described by this report:

Black Nova Scotians, like other Black Canadians, are victimized by a racist ideology and a racist social structure. Racism permeates the entire social, economic, political and cultural environment of Nova Scotian and Canadian….

During the BLAC research, we encountered widespread condemnation of the education system as biased, insensitive and racist. Systemic racism was seen as manifested in student assessment and placement; in labelling of large numbers of Black students as slow learners or having behaviour problems; in steraming (sic); in low teacher expectation; in denigration by and exclusion of Blacks from the curriculum; and in the total lack of responsiveness to the needs of Black learners and concerns of the Black community.” (pp. 34, 35)

Similarly, the differential and disadvantageous experience of African Canadians in the federal corrections system has been documented by the Office of the Correctional Investigator in it year end report in 2013. Nova Scotia’s review of the Mental Health and Addictions system produced the Together We Can Strategy (2012) found that African Nova Scotians were among a number of diverse communities whose mental health and addictions treatment needs had not yet been served sufficiently. This Nova Scotian finding was identified earlier in a national study completed by a subcommittee of the Mental Health Commission of Canada. The document they produced: Improving Mental Health Services for Immigrant, Refugee, Ethno-Cultural and Racialized Groups: Issues and Options for Service Improvement (2009). It is interesting to note, that I served on the MHCC subcommittee and was a contributor to that report. Ms. Lana MacLean, my colleague and friend who is also a person who conducts IRCAs served on the committee that produced the Nova Scotia review document.

Knowing all of this, an IRCA then seeks to understand how an individual’s ANS heritage and interaction with formal and informal systems has affected their involvement in criminal behaviour, will be a factor in their treatment while incarcerated, and will be a factor in their rehabilitation and reintegration in the community. These issues are consistent with the expectations of the report described in Judge Curran’s order requesting: “preparation of a cultural assessment report regarding his African Nova Scotian background and any cultural factors and racial factors which are suggested to be systemic in nature, but may also have individual impacts on him,” Examination of “the role played by Derek Demitrius Faulkner’s cultural and racial background with respect to the criminal offence herein.”

Preparation of this Report
In preparing this report I have participated in the following activities:
• Interview in person of Mr. Faulkner at Northeast Nova Scotia Correctional Facility
• Review of JEIN report, Crown Brief and other Disclosure material
• Interview by phone of Mr. Michael Dull, counsel for Mr. Faulkner in the civil matter
• I attempted contact with other collaterals but were not able to reach them in time for the drafting of this report. I will continue to reach out to collaterals in the event that I am called to testify on this report.

According to the cultural report, Nova Scotians engage in system racism. This is the case of R. v. Faulkner, 2019 NSPC 36 (CanLII).

It had nothing to do with any of the AGGRAVATING FACTORS that were cited in Paragraph 5 of the sentencing report

II AGGRAVATING FACTORS
(1) Robbery is inherently violent and there were implied threats of violence to clerk #1 and specific to #2
(2) Lengthy record including two robberies, 2005/2009
(3) Accused released from custody; breached release
(4) Prolonged nature of the offence – accused was in store for over an hour
(5) Clerk asked member of public to call police

Nothing to do with committing a robbery and making threats.
Nothing to do with a robbery in 2005.
Nothing to do with a robbery in 2009.
Nothing to do with other criminal convictions.
Nothing to do with being in the store over an hour.
Nothing to do with breaching conditions of release.
The court needs to consider the “systemic racism” that blacks face.

Yeah, it’s all about those racist Nova Scotians. Turned him into a career criminal.

5. Section 15 Of Canadian Charter

Equality Rights
Marginal note:
Equality before and under law and equal protection and benefit of law
15. (1) Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.
Marginal note:
Affirmative action programs
(2) Subsection (1) does not preclude any law, program or activity that has as its object the amelioration of conditions of disadvantaged individuals or groups including those that are disadvantaged because of race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age or mental or physical disability.

Serious question: under the Canadian Charter, would this count as a law that ameliorates conditions of disadvantaged individuals? Guess we aren’t so equal after all.

6. Follow-up To Old Story

This topic was covered in a previous article in June last year. It was reported that this may become the law of the land. Admittedly I should have checked deeper into it at the time.

However, it seems that these cases have been going on for many years. The National Post just missed that detail. It just has not been codified into law — yet.

How exactly do we live in any sort of just society, when there are different rules and standards for people based on their skin colour? This completely flies in the face of equality under the law, which SHOULD apply to everyone.

7. 3 Levels Of Justice Now?

Under the Gladue ruling, judges are REQUIRED to take an Aboriginal person’s background into account when handing down sentencing. There is no discretion in the matter.

However, for blacks, judges MAY take race and circumstances into account, but this is not mandatory.

Everyone else, though, must take responsibility for their own actions. They don’t have the race card to play.

Race & Crime Rates: What Liberals Won’t Admit (Gladue 2.0?)

1. Important Links

CLICK HERE, for the case R. v. Morris, [2018] O.J. No. 4631.
CLICK HERE, for the Canadian Criminal Code, robbery section.
CLICK HERE, for the Canadian Criminal Code, firearms section.
CLICK HERE, for a National Post article covering a case where an Ontario criminal court judge wants to expand “Gladue” to include blacks.
CLICK HERE, for a similar article.
CLICK HERE, for a University of Toronto research paper on race, crime and incarceration.

CLICK HERE, for FBI Uniform Crime Reporting, Table 21
CLICK HERE, for UK demographic crime data.

Background From Gladue
R. v. Gladue, 1997 CanLII 3015 (BC CA)
R. v. Gladue, [1999] 1 SCR 688, 1999 CanLII 679 (SCC)
R. v. Ipeelee, [2012] 1 SCR 433, 2012 SCC 13 (CanLII)

CLICK HERE, for race-based discounts in criminal court.
CLICK HERE, for child-killer Terri McClintic going to a “healing lodge”.
CLICK HERE, for incarceration rates among Aboriginals.

2. Quotes From Ruling

In a way this is not surprising at all. The 1997/1999 Gladue rulings created essentially a “discount” for Aboriginal offenders specifically on the basis of “historical oppression”.

Now, there is a case that is pending before the Ontario Court of Appeals, which could see the same provisions apply to blacks as well. This is a (potential) expansion of a horrible idea: race-based-discounts in the criminal justice system.

People should be outraged by this. Your crime, seriousness, and past (if any) criminal record should impact your sentence. Not your race, ethnicity, or skin colour. It is the anti-thesis of equality under the law.

[2] A jury found you guilty of a number of offences. I convicted you of possession of an unauthorized firearm, possession of a prohibited firearm with ammunition, and carrying a concealed weapon. The jury acquitted you of assaulting a peace officer with intent to resist arrest.
[3] The basic facts of your crime are straightforward. On December 13, 2014, the police received a call about a home invasion in Scarborough. As the police officers sent to investigate drove to the scene, they came upon four Black males walking in the parking lot. The officers were in plainclothes and drove unmarked police cars. One officer stopped the young men. You were one of them. You ran. As you ran, D.C. Moorcroft, who was not the officer who stopped you but was also driving into the lot, accelerated to stop you.

Police were responding to a home invasion. When they arrived, there just happened to be 4 black men in the area, and the defendant took off.

Of course, it is just a coincidence that he had a gun on him. Now it is apparently a charter violation that a police car was used to stop him.

[6] I must now sentence you for your offences. Let me go over what the Crown and your defence lawyers said should be the sentence. These positions were pretty far apart. The Crown asked for 4 to 4.5 years in jail. Your lawyers argued that the sentence should be 1 year before credit was given for the Charter breaches.

There is something here we are not being told. The Crown (supposedly) wants 4 to 4.5 years for gun possession for a first time offender? What else went on that is not included?

[9] Let me briefly explain to you what I did in Jackson. I began my judgment in that case by saying sentencing is a very individual process. The criminal law has recognized that there are cases where, in order to determine a fit and proportionate sentence, consideration must be given to an individual’s systemic and social circumstances. These circumstances may extend beyond a person who is being sentenced to include factors such a systemic discrimination and historical injustice. This has been recognized by the criminal courts, particularly in the case of Indigenous offenders. While the distinct history of colonial violence endured by Indigenous peoples cannot simply be analogized to Black Canadians, I found that the ability to consider social context in a sentencing decision is extended to all under section 718.2(e) of the Criminal Code. This allowed me to consider the unique social history of Black Canadians in sentencing Mr. Jackson. Mr. Jackson was a Black male offender not too much older than you, who pleaded guilty to a charge of possession of a prohibited gun. His lawyers presented a great deal of evidence to me on systemic anti-Black racism and its role in Mr. Jackson’s life. I took note of this evidence. I also took judicial notice, independently of these materials, of the history of colonialism, slavery, policies and practices of segregation, intergenerational trauma, and both overt and systemic racism that continue to affect Black Canadians today. With an understanding of these social factors I was able to better appreciate the circumstances that led Mr. Jackson to come before me. I sentenced him accordingly.

Gladue was horrible for exactly this reason. Instead of holding people accountable to as similar a standard as possible, some get to play the “oppression card” and get much lighter sentences. It stands the idea of equality before the law completely on its head.

The ruling would then go on to quote some social worker at length about the struggles that blacks face, and how its circumstances must be considered.

[66] Giving your acts a contextual analysis in light of the wealth of evidence provided to me on this sentencing, I do not find this to be a weighty aggravating factor in your case. I appreciate that accused people should not flee from police. Especially carrying a loaded firearm. But it is understandable to me that you ran. It was not a coldly calculated act to escape but one based upon emotion and a state of mind that has been shaped both generally and specifically by the historical racism suffered by Blacks and by you. In other words, not every flight from the police should be treated the same. Here there is a connection in the evidence between your act of flight and the systemic factors. I find it would be wrong to punish you more severely for this. When I view how anti-Black racism and historical injustices have contributed to your actions, the needs of general deterrence and denunciation normally raised by this act of flight is tempered. Given that the choice you made to do so was affected by these factors, the moral blameworthiness of your actions is also lessened.
[67] In addition, in assessing the seriousness of the offences, when I look at potential aggravating factors that often exist in the case law, here, there is no evidence that your possession of the gun is connected with other crimes such as crimes of violence or drug trafficking.
[68] There are also some very traditional mitigating factors. You are a first offender. You were young when you committed these crimes. You were 22 years old. You have supportive family and friends. There is a side of you that speaks well to your rehabilitation. I have mentioned them before. Your warmth, kindness, and respectfulness.

Being a young, first time offender is a legitimate reason to cut someone a break. No argument on that point.

But that is where the agreement ends. All this nonsense about historical racism and systemic factors (repeated throughout the ruling), was nauseating to read.

[81] Sentencing must always be an individual process. In these cases judges gave sentences of 1 year, 15 months, 18 months, just under 2 years. Some of these sentences were permitted to be served in the community rather than in jail. The cases are: R. v. Ishmael, 2014 ONCJ 136; R. v. Garton, 2018 ONSC 544; R. v. Rutledge, 2015 ONSC 6625; R. v. Shunmuganathan, 2016 ONCJ 519;
R. v. Nuttley, 2013 ONCJ 727;
R. v. Kelsy, [2008] O.J. No. 3879;
R. v. Cadienhead, [2015] O.J. No. 3125;
R. v. Williams, [2011] O.J. No. 3352 (S.C.J.);
R. v. Brown, [2006] O.J. No. 4681 (S.C.J.);
R. v. Carranza, [2004] O.J. No. 6041 (S.C.J.)

Fair enough. The Judge was looking for a little consistency.

[82]82 Now I want to talk about that elephant in the room. I know you are in custody on other charges. What those charges are were not explained to me by either the Crown or your lawyers. However, I do know from some of the materials filed what the charges are said to be. Of course, there is a charge of breaching your bail. There are also some other offences. But they are not gun offences. Your surety surrendered your bail so you are in custody on the charges I am sentencing you for. To someone hearing this, I am sure they will say you have not behaved well while on bail. They may be right. But you are presumed innocent of these alleged new offences. I am sentencing you as a first offender. Someone without a criminal record. The new charges do not change that. The presumption of innocence is the foundation of our criminal justice system. While it may be hard for many to understand, I cannot let that foundation be eroded or chipped away by taking into account the new charges.

So, “first-timer” comes with a few caveats: Morris breached his bail, and is facing additional charges. However, the Judge has decided to ignore this in sentencing him as a first-timer.

It would be nice to know how exactly bail was breached, and what exactly the other charges are. But they are not mentioned.

[92] I also find that the anti-Black racism evidence presented on the sentencing is relevant in assessing the weight I should give this. Racism can operate very subtly. It can be there lurking in the background of people’s minds, unconsciously influencing their judgment and making them act in certain ways towards certain people.
[93] I want to be clear that I am not painting the police with the brush of overt racism in this case. I do not have the evidence to support that. But I am troubled. If I asked myself: If it was someone other than a young Black man running away from the police that night, would D.C. Moorcroft have driven in the aggressive way that he did? Would Mr. Morris and the car have collided? I am troubled because in all honesty, I cannot conclude it would have happened in the same way.

So, racism happens, but I have no evidence that there was any in this case. Therefore, I will still bring it up as a mitigating factor.

This Judge talks in circles about how there is all this systemic racism, and how it can be very subtle. Yet he notes that there is no proof that there was racism in this case. So what is the point then?

E. CONCLUSION
[97] After mitigation for the Charter violations, I have sentenced you to a jail sentence of 12 months. You have done a lot of dead time. The sentence will be based upon the credit you will receive for that dead time. I will credit you 1.5 to 1 for that pre-trial custody. The evidence shows that you received no real programming, had a difficult time in jail, and at times experienced physical discomfort in jail due to your medical conditions. You also did not receive consideration for parole or remission while in pre-trial custody. I find it right to give this enhanced credit. Therefore, 243 days of pre-trial custody will be used up. You will be sentenced to a further 1 day in jail on each charge concurrently. I also made a DNA order, s. 109 weapons prohibition, and the forfeiture order.

So not even a year. Just 8 months.

3. University of Toronto Article On Race & Crime

Although not specific to this case, this article by Akwasi Owusu-Bempah is an interesting read. If nothing else, it shows the extent that this academic will go to avoid the obvious conclusion:

SOME GROUPS JUST COMMIT MORE CRIME

Yes, that’s it. Groups are not equal when it comes to committing crime. That is the hard truth that lawyers, judges, politicians, academics and social workers refuse to address.

On the topic of “disparity”, it’s worth noting that males make up over 90% of prison inmates. However, there is no push claiming discrimination against them. Oh, the double standards.

Instead, he will talk in circles. Owusu-Bempah will blame mistrust, victimization in black and Aboriginal neighbourhoods, racial bias (without proving it), and Court discrimination (again, without proving it). Although the author touches the topic of crime rates, he avoids making any definitive statements. It’s like he is deliberately avoiding the obvious answer.

Abstract and Keywords
Canada effectively bans systematic collection and dissemination of racially disaggregated criminal justice statistics. A significant proportion of Canada’s racial minority populations perceive bias in the criminal justice system, especially on the part of police. Aboriginal and black Canadians are grossly overrepresented in Canada’s correctional institutions. Some evidence suggests that both Aboriginal and black populations are overrepresented with respect to violent offending and victimization. Social conditions in which Aboriginal and black Canadians live are at least partially to blame for their possibly elevated rates of violent offending. Evidence indicates that racial bias exists in the administration of Canadian criminal justice. At times, this discrimination has been supported by court decisions. Discrimination and disparity are at times acknowledged by government, but they are seldom wholeheartedly addressed. There is a lack of political will to address issues of racial minority overrepresentation in relation to manifestations of racial discrimination or to the societal conditions that lead to criminal offending.

Oh, the mental gymnastics of the author are blatant:

  • Minorities “perceive” bias against them
  • There is overrepresentation
  • Bias in administration
  • Government acknowledges disparity
  • No political will to address overrepresentation
  • Societal conditions lead to offending

However:

  • The author mentions overrepresentation regarding offending, but immediately lumps it in with “victimization”, as if to muddy the waters
  • Lack of available objective data, yet we are able to make conclusions based on much more subjective things, such as perceived bias
  • Right, not elevated rates, but “possibly” elevated rates

Connections among race, crime, and criminal justice are often portrayed in Canadian media images and are captured in the popular imagination. Yet, in comparison to the United States and Great Britain, these phenomena receive relatively little attention from Canadian academics and policy makers. A lack of readily available criminal justice data disaggregated by race makes it particularly difficult for researchers to examine the nature of these racial differences. Thus, we are unable to determine the extent to which higher rates of offending among certain racial groups and discrimination in the administration of criminal justice contribute to the apparent overrepresentation

There’s a lack of data, but this author will still make claims about bias and discrimination, without actually proving it. He will also tap-dance around the obvious: If a group commits crime at a much higher rate, doesn’t that justify higher incarceration rates?

Nonetheless, available evidence indicates that a significant proportion of Canada’s racial minority populations and a sizable proportion of the white population perceive bias in the criminal justice system. These public perceptions are supported by data that show that certain racial minority groups, particularly Aboriginal and black Canadians, are grossly overrepresented in Canada’s correctional institutions. Further evidence indicates that racial bias does exist in the administration of Canadian criminal justice, and, at times, this discrimination has been supported by court decisions. We cannot discount, however, the probability that increased rates of offending among certain racialized groups contributes to their overrepresentation in correctional statistics. As we show in this essay, research suggests that Aboriginal and black Canadians are overrepresented with respect to violent offending and victimization. The Canadian federal government itself has pointed out that the social conditions in which Aboriginals live is at least partially to blame for their rates of violent offending (Department of Justice 2009). We have previously made the same connection with respect to black Canadians (Wortley and Owusu-Bempah2011a).

Owusu-Bempah contradicts himself here. He claims there is “perceived” bias from many people. Not “actual” bias, but perceived bias. He then goes on to say that there is overrepresentation among certain groups.

He then offers a perfectly reasonable explanation for the higher incarceration rate: increased offending.

Just a thought. If a certain group commits crime at a higher rate, then it is not bias or discrimination that there would be more of them involved with the courts.

Unfortunately, there is an apparent lack of political will to address issues of racial minority overrepresentation in the Canadian criminal justice system. Ambivalence to address these issues relates both to the manifestations of racial discrimination in the system, as well as to the societal conditions that lead to criminal offending. Discrimination and disparity may be at times acknowledged, but they are seldom wholeheartedly addressed. When addressed, the means are seldom thoroughly evaluated for effectiveness, and, when evaluated, the results are rarely made public.

Difficult to believe, but this is just the next paragraph. Owusu-Bempah claims there is no political will to address racial minority overrepresentation. Yet, he previously commented that there was a higher rate of offending.

This seems like a solution in search of a problem.

Many have argued that relatively high rates of homicide and gun crime among African Canadians and Aboriginals in Canada are reflective of their overrepresentation in street gangs. Unfortunately, official police statistics on Canadian gangs are almost nonexistent

Yeah, good job.

Canada’s reluctance to acknowledge and document race is most evident in the operation of its criminal justice system and in its criminal justice policies. Unlike in the United States and the United Kingdom, where race-based criminal justice statistics are readily available to the public and researchers alike, the Canadian criminal justice system does not systematically collect or publish statistics on the race of individuals processed through the system. The debate over the collection of racial data from the criminal justice sector in Canada can be traced back as far as 1929 (Roberts 1992). Discussions about the collection, or more accurately, the public release of these data have emerged more recently in the context of broader debates about race, crime, and the administration of criminal justice—particularly related to the circumstances of Aboriginal and black Canadians (Hatt 1994; Johnston 1994; Gabor 1994; Roberts 1994; Wortley 1999; Owusu-Bempah and Millar 2010). On the one hand, allegations of racial discrimination have been leveled against the justice system to explain the overrepresentation of certain racial minority groups in the few available sources of police and correctional data. On the other hand, it has been suggested that racial minorities are disproportionately involved in criminal activity, which accounts for their disproportionate involvement with the criminal justice system as reflected in the data. Unfortunately, our ability to test either of these claims is limited by the absence of available data, despite numerous calls for its collection. Several major attempts have been made in Canada to collect racial and ethnic data, particularly in the policing sector (Fine 1990; Wortley and Marshall 2005; Leclair InfoCom 2009); these attempts, however, have not paved the way for systematic data collection

The author addresses crime rates, but gives a wishy washy answer. There’s not enough data to tell one way or another whether it is: (a) discrimination; or (b) actual crime, that results in the disparities. Yet, feelings about perceived bias and virtue signalling bureaucrats apologizing are apparently good evidence.

There is an interesting point to be taken from this: if there was concrete data on race and crime rates, then the debate could be put to bed once and for all.

The article keeps repeating the same idea and muddying the waters: we don’t have data, so we can’t be sure what causes discrepancies in the representation.

If the author wanted a reference point, why not check the data from the US and UK? After all, he knows it is there.

4. Crime Data From Britain

CLICK HERE, for UK demographic crime data.

There were 698,737 arrests in 2017/18, a fall of 8% on the previous year – both years’ figures exclude Lancashire Police (see ‘Things you need to know’)
-Black people were over 3 times as likely to be arrested as White people – there were 35 arrests for every 1,000 —Black people, and 11 arrests for every 1,000 White people
-overall, men were over 5 times as likely to be arrested as women – there were 22 arrests for every 1,000 men, and -4 arrests for every 1,000 women
-Black women were more than twice as likely to be arrested as White women – there were 7 arrests for every 1,000 —Black women, and 3 arrests for every 1,000 White women

And a few pages later,

there were 698,737 arrests in England and Wales in 2017/18 (excluding the Lancashire police force area), at a rate of 13 arrests per 1,000 people
there were 62,501 fewer arrests in 2017/18 compared with the previous year, a fall of 8% (excluding Lancashire Police from both years)
Black people were over 3 times as likely to be arrested as White people – there were 35 arrests for every 1,000 Black people, and 11 arrests for every 1,000 White people
people with Mixed ethnicity were over twice as likely to be arrested as White people – there were 25 arrests for every 1,000 people with Mixed ethnicity, and 11 arrests for every 1,000 White people

So the UK Government is willing to be quite open and blunt about the disparities in race and offending. And what about the US.

5. Crime Data From US FBI

CLICK HERE, for FBI Uniform Crime Reporting, Table 21. This is compiled from 2016, though the stats over the years don’t change much.

Looking at Table 21C (people aged 18 or over)
Worth noting the US black population is about 13% commits:

  • 52% of homicides
  • 28% of rapes
  • 51% of robberies
  • 32% of aggravated assault
  • 36% of violent crime
  • 41% of weapons carrying
  • 30% buying stolen property

…. and so on.

Are blacks greatly overrepresented in US prisons? Absolutely. And for a very good reason — disproportionate amount of violent and serious crime.

Are US sentences in general too harsh? A fair point, but a topic for another day. This post concerns treating people equally.

6. Gladue 2.0 Addresses Wrong Problem

With this proposed change, the scope of Gladue will be broadened. This means that it will not be restricted to Aboriginals.

The claim is that this will reduce overrepresentation in the courts and prison system. Problem is: it focuses on making prisons look like a random sample of society, rather than a reflection of who is actually committing the most serious crime.

It’s what liberals do not want to acknowledge:

SOME GROUPS JUST COMMIT MORE CRIME

It is not necessarily due to “oppression” or “systemic bias”, or any other such nonsense. It is caused by these groups, on average, behaving differently. While it is obviously desirable for society to reduce crime and their prison populations, this is a backwards approach.

Should the Ontario Court of Appeals (and possibly the Supreme Court of Canada) confirm this nonsense, racial equality dies. Your skin colour will determine your punishment, not your crime. Though arguably that was the case with Gladue.

Keep in mind, it is the Supreme Court of Canada that upheld Gladue in the first place (appealed from BC). There is nothing to indicated they wouldn’t extend their ruling to this.