The Climate Change Money Pit: Where Is It Really Going?

Ever think that your tax dollars are being wasted on the climate change scam? Well, they are. But at least, one can have a better idea of “where” they are being wasted. Here are some, but not all of the recent amounts in recent years.

Considering how little attention any of this gets in the media, or even in political spheres, it’s fair to ask why. Notice that scandals in Ottawa tend to be over relatively minor things. It’s a great way to divert attention.

Some of the grants contain little to no information, making it impossible to say for certain what’s happening. They could be legitimate, or they could just be slush funds. This list only contains money handed over by Ottawa, not any Provincial or local efforts.

NAME DATE AMOUNT
African Development Bank Group Mar. 31, 2021 $132,900,000
Agence Française de Développement Mar. 18, 2020 $10,000,000
Alliance agricole international UPA-DI, CECI Mar. 19, 2021 $16,589,517
Asian Development Bank Mar. 23, 2017 $10,000,000
Canadian Co-operative Association Apr. 1, 2019 $14,800,000
Canadian Coop Society for Int’l Development Sep. 25, 2018 $19,177,873
Canadian Coop Society for Int’l Development Mar. 10, 2020 $17,502,828
Canadian Coop Society for Int’l Development Mar. 19, 2020 $8,030,063
Canadian Coop Society for Int’l Development Mar. 1, 2021 $9,829,509
Canadian Foundation For Development Tech Aug. 27, 2018 $399,141,615
Canadian Foundation For Development Tech Apr. 1, 2021 $747,762,060
Canadian Inst. for Clean Growth, Climate Change May 14, 2019 $20,000,000
CARE Canada May 8, 2013 $12,000,000
Caribbean Development Bank Mar. 27, 2012 $20,000,000
Centre for International Studies, Cooperation Mar. 27, 2019 $13,000,000
Centre for International Studies, Cooperation Mar. 29, 2019 $17,993,407
City of Richmond Mar. 4, 2020 $13,780,000
City of Saint John Mar. 11, 2020 $11,916,074
Cuso International Apr. 15, 2020 $49,985,745
Federation of Canadian Municipalities Jan. 31, 2017 $75,000,000
Federation of Canadian Municipalities Green Fund Mar. 19, 2018 $62,500,000
Government of Northwest Territories Sep. 13, 2019 $30,000,000
Government of Nova Scotia Jul. 22, 2019 $90,000,000
Government of Nova Scotia May 25, 2020 $24,997,500
Government of Yukon Sep. 20, 2019 $118,212,428
Green Climate Fund Mar. 25, 2020 $190,000,000
IBRD Trust Funds – World Bank Mar. 24, 2016 $30,000,000
IBRD Trust Funds – World Bank Jan. 12, 2018 $165,000,000
IBRD Trust Funds – World Bank May 14, 2018 $20,000,000
IBRD Trust Funds – World Bank Sep. 16, 2019 $20,000,000
IBRD Trust Funds – World Bank Feb. 26, 2020 $16,500,000
IBRD Trust Funds – World Bank May 29, 2020 $28,000,000
IBRD Trust Funds – World Bank May 29, 2020 $410,000,000
IBRD Trust Funds – World Bank Mar. 31, 2021 $35,000,000
IDB – Inter-American Development Bank Mar. 28, 2018 $16,000,000
IDB – Inter-American Development Bank Mar. 19, 2019 $223,500,000
IDB – Inter-American Development Bank Mar. 31, 2021 $190,000,000
IDRC – International Development Research Centre Mar. 24, 2017 $19,600,000
IFAD – International Fund for Agricultural Development Dec. 19, 2019 $150,000,000
IFAD – International Fund for Agricultural Development Mar. 31, 2021 $190,000,000
Oxfam-Quebec Sep. 5, 2019 $13,000,000
Papyrus S.A. (Haiti) Mar. 15, 2019 $13,000,000
Seedchange May 26, 2015 $17,599,059
St. Francis Xavier University Dec. 18, 2019 $9,797,119
Sustainable Development Technologies Canada Dec. 10, 2014 $23,293,000
United Nations Development Programme Mar. 8, 2018 $10,150,000
United Nations Environment Programme Oct. 16, 2013 $15,500,000
United Nations University Jun. 22, 2020 $10,000,000
UPA Développement international Apr. 7, 2020 $12,015,755
World Food Programme Jan. 27, 2020 $20,000,000
WUSC – World University Service of Canada Jan. 5, 2021 $19,487,814

Keep in mind, this is nowhere near the full list of such payments, but does include many of the larger grants. Now, where is any of this going? While some are spent locally, many are handed out to foreign groups. Let’s look at a few of them.

The Green Climate Fund is essentially a large slush fund that countries pay into, so that the money can be doled out to various climate programs, with little to no accountability. Of course, no one ever voted on allowing unelected bureaucrats to do this, but whatever.

4.3 Catalysing private sector finance at scale
21. Contributing to making financial flows managed by the private sector consistent with a pathway towards low greenhouse gas emissions and climate resilient development is key to realizing the scale of resources – in the trillions – needed to implement developing countries’ NDCs, ACs, NAPs, TNAs, TPs , and other climate strategies. The GCF’s 2020-2023 programming will aim to more systematically and fully realize the potential of the GCF to mobilize resources at scale, and support activities to increase the impact of investments, while encouraging a wider alignment of financial flows with countries’ climate plans and strategies.

According to their updated 2020 to 2023 plan, the Green Climate Fund projects that trillions of dollars (with a “T”) will be needed for developing countries to implement their various goals.

The African Development Bank Group is set up to hand out grants to companies that are working to achieve the UNSDA, or the Agenda 2030 goals. This acts as a middleman to write the cheques. Interestingly, in its FAQ section, there isn’t a question about ensuring the accountability of the funds.

The Asian Development Bank, hands out money to finance a variety of projects, with climate change being one of them. It’s interesting, given how nations like China, Japan and South Korea are actually more wealthy than Canada.

The Inter-American Development Bank works in much the same ways as others, acting as a middleman to hand out money for various projects related to the UN Sustainable Development Agenda. This primarily takes effect in South America.

Keep in mind, there is virtually no way to track the money once it’s left the country. This means there is really no way to ensure it goes where it’s supposed to. An astute person will realize how absurd it is for Canada to be borrowing money only to be sending it off overseas, at least the portions sent abroad. We will be charged endless interest for funds that will never benefit Canadians. An even more observant person will take note that the international banking system means private borrowing, and no way to pay it off.

But hey, as long as Canada appears virtuous in the eyes of outsiders, then what else matters?

(1) https://search.open.canada.ca/en/gc/
(2) https://www.greenclimate.fund/
(3) https://www.greenclimate.fund/document/updated-strategic-plan-green-climate-fund-2020-2023
(4) https://www.greenclimate.fund/sites/default/files/document/updated-strategic-plan-green-climate-fund-2020-2023.pdf
(5) Updated Strategic Plan Green Climate Fund 2020-2023
(6) https://www.afdb.org/en/about/mission-strategy
(7) https://www.adb.org/
(8) https://www.iadb.org/

2 Replies to “The Climate Change Money Pit: Where Is It Really Going?”

  1. Meanwhile we have millions living on the street right here in Canada! This is a form of treason in my view because helping the UN is helping the New World communist government to take-over Canada permanently.

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