Source Countries For International Students: 2004-2013

Ever wonder how many international students are in Canada, and where they come from? Well, we have some data available, courtesy of the Federal Government. Let’s take a look at this troubling pattern.

The replacement agenda (a.k.a. the Kalergi Plan) is alive and well. And flooding the country with students from abroad is just one way to help implement it. Colleges and universities get much needed cash, and students get access to life in the West.

One thing to note: it appears that the data from these tables, page 44, refers to the TOTAL number of international students within Canada. This is not the same as the number of visas issued annually.

INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2004
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 39,954 23.7 1
South Korea 26,700 15.8 2
United States 12,807 7.6 3
Japan 8,983 5.3 4
United Kingdom, Colonies 6,685 4.0 5
India 6,680 4.0 6
France 6,677 4.0 7
Taiwan 5,247 3.1 8
Mexico 3,384 2.0 9
Germany 2,294 1.4 10
Iran 2,110 1.4 11
Hong Kong 1,993 1.2 12
Pakistan 1,836 1.1 13
Vietnam 1,751 1.0 14
Bangladesh 1,731 1.0 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 122,147 72.4
TOTAL — OTHERS 46,492 27.6
GRAND TOTAL 168,639 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2005
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 40,021 23.5 1
South Korea 27,596 16.2 2
United States 13,130 7.7 3
Japan 9,057 5.3 4
India 7,153 4.2 5
France 6,952 4.1 6
United Kingdom, Colonies 5,944 3.5 7
Taiwan 4,928 2.9 8
Mexico 3,601 2.1 9
Iran 2,558 1.5 10
Germany 2,462 1.4 11
Hong Kong 2,397 1.4 12
Pakistan 1,795 1.1 13
Bangladesh 1,718 1.0 14
Vietnam 1,695 1.0 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 131,007 76.9
TOTAL — OTHERS 39,461 23.1
GRAND TOTAL 170,468 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2006
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 39,993 23.2 1
South Korea 29,551 17.1 2
United States 12,920 7.5 3
Japan 8,310 4.8 4
France 8,125 4.7 5
India 7,464 4.3 6
United Kingdom, Colonies 5,404 3.1 7
Taiwan 4,853 2.8 8
Mexico 3,839 2.2 9
Hong Kong 2,663 1.5 10
Germany 2,588 1.5 11
Iran 2,342 1.4 12
Pakistan 1,839 1.1 13
Morocco 1,723 1.0 14
Bangladesh 1,651 0.9 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 133,265 77.3
TOTAL — OTHERS 39,110 22.7
GRAND TOTAL 172,375 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2007
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 41,113 22.9 1
South Korea 30,676 17.1 2
United States 12,835 7.2 3
France 9,005 5.0 4
India 7,929 4.4 5
Japan 7,662 4.3 6
United Kingdom, Colonies 5,021 2.8 7
Taiwan 4,683 2.6 8
Mexico 3,861 2.2 9
Germany 2,947 1.6 10
Hong Kong 2,812 1.5 11
Iran 2,390 1.3 12
Brazil 1,959 1.1 13
Morocco 1,930 1.1 14
Nigeria 1,919 1.1 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 136,742 76.3
TOTAL — OTHERS 42,413 23.7
GRAND TOTAL 179,155 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2008
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 43,101 23.4 1
South Korea 28,976 15.7 2
United States 12,226 6.6 3
France 9,377 5.1 4
India 8,286 4.5 5
Japan 6,592 3.6 6
United Kingdom 4,627 2.5 7
Saudi Arabia 4,463 2.4 8
Taiwan 4,122 2.2 9
Mexico 3,879 2.1 10
Germany 3,141 1.7 11
Hong Kong 2,912 1.6 12
Iran 2,649 1.4 13
Brazil 2,396 1.3 14
Nigeria 2,178 1.2 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 138,925 75.4
TOTAL — OTHERS 45,254 24.6
GRAND TOTAL 184,179 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2009
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 50,446 24.7 1
South Korea 27,166 13.3 2
United States 12,128 5.9 3
India 11,682 5.7 4
France 10,358 5.1 5
Saudi Arabia 8,413 4.1 6
Japan 6,113 3.0 7
Mexico 4,184 2.1 8
United Kingdom, Colonies 4,151 2.0 9
Taiwan 3,816 1.9 10
Iran 3,507 1.7 11
Germany 3,102 1.5 12
Hong Kong 2,956 1.4 13
Nigeria 2,820 1.4 14
Brazil 2,415 1.2 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 153,257 75.1
TOTAL — OTHERS 50,795 24.9
GRAND TOTAL 204,052 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2010
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 57,339 25.4 1
South Korea 25,301 11.2 2
India 20,281 9.0 3
Saudi Arabia 12,267 5.4 4
United States 12,156 5.4 5
France 11,365 5.0 6
Japan 5,874 2.6 7
Mexico 4,384 1.9 8
Iran 3,930 1.7 9
Nigeria 3,648 1.6 10
Taiwan 3,639 1.6 11
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,563 1.5 12
Germany 3,142 1.4 13
Hong Kong 2,864 1.3 14
Brazil 2,722 1.2 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 172,475 76.5
TOTAL — OTHERS 52,920 23.5
GRAND TOTAL 225,395 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2011
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 68,469 27.5 1
India 27,339 11.0 2
South Korea 22,631 9.1 3
Saudi Arabia 14,180 5.7 4
France 12,715 5.1 5
United States 12,191 4.9 6
Japan 6,018 2.4 7
Mexico 4,801 1.9 8
Iran 4,755 1.9 9
Nigeria 4,432 1.8 10
Taiwan 3,370 1.4 11
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,360 1.4 12
Brazil 3,270 1.3 13
Pakistan 3,161 1.3 14
Vietnam 3,110 1.3 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 190,432 76.5
TOTAL — OTHERS 58,395 23.5
GRAND TOTAL 248,827 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2012
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 81,444 29.5 1
India 32,243 11.7 2
South Korea 20,285 7.4 3
France 14,748 5.3 4
Saudi Arabia 13,930 5.0 5
United States 12,302 4.5 6
Japan 6,486 2.4 7
Nigeria 5,481 2.0 8
Iran 5,229 1.9 9
Brazil 5,126 1.8 10
Mexio 4,977 1.8 11
Pakistan 3,588 1.3 12
Vietnam 3,523 1.3 13
Taiwan 3,358 1.2 14
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,352 1.2 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 208,961 75.6
TOTAL — OTHERS 66,922 24.5
GRAND TOTAL 275,883 100
INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS IN CANADA: 2013
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 95,731 31.4 1
India 34,887 11.4 2
South Korea 19,123 6.3 3
France 16,486 5.4 4
Saudi Arabia 13,955 4.6 5
United States 12,263 4.0 6
Brazil 7,757 2.5 7
Nigeria 6,903 2.3 8
Japan 6,604 2.2 9
Mexico 5,306 1.7 10
Iran 5,177 1.7 11
Vietnam 4,173 1.4 12
Pakistan 4,045 1.3 13
Taiwan 3,500 1.1 14
United Kingdom, Colonies 3,462 1.1 15
TOTAL — TOP 15 239,372 78.6
TOTAL — OTHERS 65,504 21.4
GRAND TOTAL 304,876 100

Again, this refers to the total number of students in the country, not the amount of visas issued in any given year. Needless to say, those numbers continue to climb as well. Note: page 48 of the same document gives even higher totals for the same years.

For a reference point, consider page 15 of the 2020 Canada Annual Immigration Report to Parliament. It was reported that:

“In 2019, 827,586 international students held valid study permits in Canada. Of these, 402,427 new study permits were issued (a 15% increase from 2018).”

This means that the number of foreign students has nearly tripled from 2013 to 2019/2020. This is a major source of people entering the country.

Keep in mind, there are many, MANY pathways for international students to stay longer, or transition into permanent residents. The probable reason for not being open about this is to minimize the backlash from the already high immigration rates.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

(A.0) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/index.html
(A.1) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1966.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1966
(A.2) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1967.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1967
(A.3) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1968.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1968
(A.4) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1969.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1969
(A.5) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1970.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1970
(A.6) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1971.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1971
(A.7) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1972.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1972
(A.8) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1973.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1973
(A.9) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1974.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1974
(A.10) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1975.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1975
(A.11) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1976.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1976
(A.12) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1977.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1977
(A.13) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1978.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1978
(A.14) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1979.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1979
(A.15) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1980.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1980
(A.16) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1981.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1981
(A.17) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1982.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1982
(A.18) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1983.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1983
(A.19) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1984.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1984
(A.20) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1985.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1985
(A.21) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1986.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1986
(A.22) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1987.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1987
(A.23) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1988.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1988
(A.24) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1989.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1989
(A.25) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1990.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1990
(A.26) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1991.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1991
(A.27) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1992.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1992
(A.28) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1993.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1993
(A.29) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1994.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1994
(A.30) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1995.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1995
(A.31) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1996.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1996

(B.0) https://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.505817/publication.html
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/reports-statistics/statistics-open-data.html
(B.1) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/cic/MP43-333-1999-eng.pdf
Canada Immigration Facts And Figures 1998
(B.2) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/MP43-333-2000E.pdf
(B.3) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2015/cic/Ci1-8-10-2013-eng.pdf
Temporary Migration In Canada 2004-2013

(C.0) Parliament Report Index
http://archive.is/vwM6G
(C.1) 2004 Report to Canadian Parliament
2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.2) 2005 Report to Canadian Parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.3) 2006 Report to Canadian Parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.4) 2007 Report to Canadian Parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.5) 2008 Report to Canadian Parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.6) 2009 report to Canadian Parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.7) 2010 Report to Canadian Parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.8) 2011 Report to Canadian Parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.9) 2012 Report to Canadian Parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.10) 2013 Report to Canadian Parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.11) 2014 Report to Canadian Parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.12) 2015 Report to Canadian Parliament
2015.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.13) 2016 Report to Canadian Parliament
2016.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.14) 2017 Report to Canadian Parliament
2017.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15) 2018 Report to CDN Parliament
2018.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15.2) 2019-2021 Supplemental Report
http://archive.is/onyev
(C.16) 2019 Report to Canadian Parliament
2019.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.17) 2020 Report to Canadian Parliament
2020.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.18) 2021 Report to Canadian Parliament
2021.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament

Replacement Migration In Canada: 1980 – 2020 Statistics

Note: This is a continuation of the recent piece, which covered the years from 1989 through 1998. The data needs to be shown in order to fully demonstrate what’s really going on.

This piece does come with an obvious disclaimer: it doesn’t take the hordes of “temporary” workers and student visas in account. That will be addressed elsewhere.

The Kalergi Plan was laid out for Europe a century ago. The goal was to ultimately get rid of all the whites, with a combination of open doors immigration, depressed local birth rates, and miscegenation. That said, the plot it not limited to Europe, but to all white countries.

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

Despite what many think, LEGAL immigration into Canada is actually a much larger threat than illegal aliens, given the true scale of the replacement that is happening. What was founded as a European (British) colony is becoming unrecognizable due to forced demographic changes. There are also social, economic, environmental and voting changes to consider. See this Canadian series, and the UN programs for more detail. Politicians, the media, and so-called “experts” have no interest in coming clean on this.

CLICK HERE, for UN Genocide Prevention/Punishment Convention.
CLICK HERE, for Barcelona Declaration & Kalergi Plan.
CLICK HERE, for UN Kalergi Plan (population replacement).
CLICK HERE, for UN replacement efforts since 1974.
CLICK HERE, for tracing steps of UN replacement agenda.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

2. Replacement Migration Fits U.N. Definition Of Genocide

Isn’t trying to replace or displace a population considered genocide by the United Nations? Well, it does fit their own definitions….

Article I
The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.

Article II
In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:
(a) Killing members of the group;
(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

Article III
The following acts shall be punishable:
(a) Genocide;
(b) Conspiracy to commit genocide;
(c) Direct and public incitement to commit genocide;
(d) Attempt to commit genocide;
(e) Complicity in genocide.

Article IV
Persons committing genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III shall be punished, whether they are constitutionally responsible rulers, public officials or private individuals.

Article V
The Contracting Parties undertake to enact, in accordance with their respective Constitutions, the necessary legislation to give effect to the provisions of the present Convention, and, in particular, to provide effective penalties for persons guilty of genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III.

It’s also worth asking if pluralism (imposed without the consent of the people) would amount to genocide under the terms as laid out by the U.N. in the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide After all, if pluralism results in at least a partial replacement of a group, isn’t that bringing about its destruction?

3. Genocidal Population Replacement Long Time Problem

Let’s have a look at some of those recent years. While 2003 to 2020 has already been covered pretty extensively on this site, the problem extends much further than that.

PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1980
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Vietnam 25,541 17.8 1
United Kingdom 18,245 12.8 2
United States 9,926 6.9 3
India 8,483 5.9 4
Hong Kong 6,309 4.4 5
Laos 6,206 4.4 6
Philippines 6,051 4.2 7
China 4,936 3.5 8
Portugal 4,228 3.0 9
TOTAL — TOP 9 89,955 62.9
TOTAL — OTHERS 53,132 37.1
GRAND TOTAL 143,087 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1980
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa 4,330 3.0
Asia 71,062 50.0
South America 5,433 3.8
Caribbean/Antilles 7,362 5.2
United States 9,926 6.9
Europe and the United Kingdom 41,168 28.8
Others 3,297 2.8
Total 143,087 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1981
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
United Kingdom 21,154 16.5 1
United States 10,559 8.2 2
India 8,256 6.4 3
Vietnam 8,251 6.4 4
China 6,550 5.1 5
Hong Kong 6,451 5.0 6
Philippines 5,859 4.6 7
Poland 3,850 3.0 8
Haiti 3,667 2.8 9
TOTAL — TOP 9 74,594 58
TOTAL — OTHERS 54,021 42.0
GRAND TOTAL 128,618 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1981
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa 4,887 3.8
Asia 48,830 38.0
South America 6,136 4.8
Caribbean/Antilles 8,633 6.7
United States 10,559 8.2
Europe and the United Kingdom 46,295 36.0
Others 3,278 2.5
Total 128,618 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1982
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
United Kingdom 16,445 13.6 1
United States 9,360 7.7 2
Poland 8,278 6.8 3
India 7,776 6.4 4
Hong Kong 6,542 5.4 5
Vietnam 5,935 4.9 6
Philippines 5,062 4.2 7
Germany 4,425 3.7 8
China 3,571 2.9 9
TOTAL — TOP 9 67,414 55.6
TOTAL — OTHERS 57,753 44.4
GRAND TOTAL 121,167 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1982
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa 4,510 3.7
Asia 41,617 34.3
South America 6,870 5.7
Caribbean/Antilles 8,674 7.2
United States 9,360 7.7
Europe and the United Kingdom 46,150 38.1
Others 3,966 3.3
Total 121,167 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1983
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
United States 7,381 8.3 1
India 7,041 7.9 2
Hong Kong 6,710 7.5 3
Vietnam 6,451 7.2 4
United Kingdom 5,737 6.4 5
Poland 5,094 5.7 6
Philippines 4,454 5.1 7
Haiti 2,827 3.2 8
Guyana 2,605 2.9 9
TOTAL — TOP 9 48,300 54.2
TOTAL — OTHERS 40,857 45.8
GRAND TOTAL 89,157 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1983
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa 3,659 4.1
Asia 36,906 41.4
South America 4,816 5.4
Caribbean/Antilles 7,216 8.1
United States 7,381 8.3
Europe and the United Kingdom 24,312 27.3
Others 4,867 5.4
Total 89,157 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1984
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Vietnam 10,950 12.4 1
Hong Kong 7,696 8.7 2
United States 6,922 7.8 3
India 5,502 6.2 4
United Kingdom 5,104 5.8 5
Poland 4,499 5.1 6
Philippines 3,748 4.2 7
El Salvador 2,569 2.9 8
Jamaica 2,479 2.8 9
TOTAL — TOP 9 49,479 56.1
TOTAL — OTHERS 38,760 43.9
GRAND TOTAL 88,239 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1984
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 3,552 4.0
Asia 41,920 47.5
South America 4,085 4.6
Caribbean/Antilles 5,630 6.4
United States 6,922 7.8
Europe and the United Kingdom 20,901 23.7
Others 5,229 5.9
Total 88,239 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1985
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Vietnam 10,404 12.3 1
Hong Kong 7,380 8.8 2
United States 6,669 7.9 3
United Kingdom 4,454 5.3 4
India 4,028 4.8 5
Poland 3,617 4.3 6
Philippines 3,076 3.6 7
Jamaica 2,922 3.5 8
El Salvador 2,881 3.4 9
Guyana 2,301 2.7 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 47,732 56.6
TOTAL — OTHERS 36,570 43.4
GRAND TOTAL 84,302 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1985
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 3,545 4.2
Asia and Pacific 38,597 45.8
South America 4,356 4.2
North/Central America 5,016 6.0
Caribbean/Antilles 6,132 7.2
United States 6,669 7.2
Europe and the United Kingdom 18,859 22.4
Others 1,128 1.2
Total 84,302 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1986
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
United States 7,275 7.3 1
India 6,940 7.0 2
Vietnam 6,622 6.7 3
Hong Kong 5,893 5.9 4
Poland 5,231 5.3 5
United Kingdom 5,088 5.1 6
Jamaica 4,652 4.7 7
Philippines 4,102 4.1 8
Guyana 3,905 4.0 9
El Salvador 3,167 3.2 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 52,875 53.3
TOTAL — OTHERS 46,344 46.7
GRAND TOTAL 99,219 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1986
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 4,770 4.8
Asia and Pacific 41,600 41.9
South America 6,686 6.7
North/Central America 6,078 6.1
Caribbean/Antilles 8,874 9.0
United States 7,275 7.4
Europe and the United Kingdom 22,709 22.9
Others 1,227 1.2
Total 99,219 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1987
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 16,170 10.6 1
India 9,692 6.4 2
United Kingdom 8,547 5.6 3
United States 7,967 5.2 4
Philippines 7,343 4.8 5
Portugal 7,300 4.8 6
Poland 7,036 4.7 7
Guyana 6,073 4.0 8
Vietnam 5,668 3.7 9
Jamaica 5,422 3.6 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 81,218 53.4
TOTAL — OTHERS 70,880 46,6
GRAND TOTAL 152,098 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1987
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 8,501 5.6
Asia and Pacific 67,337 44.3
South America 10,801 7.1
North/Central America 6,873 4.5
Caribbean/Antilles 11,227 7.4
United States 7,967 5.2
Europe and the United Kingdom 37,563 24.7
Others 1,829 1.2
Total 152,098 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1988
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 23,281 14.4 1
India 10,409 6.4 2
Poland 9,231 5.7 3
United Kingdom 9,172 5.7 4
Philippines 8,310 5.1 5
United States 6,537 4.0 6
Portugal 6,467 4.0 7
Vietnam 6,196 3.8 8
Jamaica 3,923 2.4 9
Iran 3,669 2.3 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 87,195 53.8
TOTAL — OTHERS 74,734 46.2
GRAND TOTAL 161,929 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1988
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 9,380 5.8
Asia and Pacific 81,136 50.1
South America 7,255 4.5
North/Central America 5,671 3.5
Caribbean/Antilles 9,439 5.9
United States 6,537 4.0
Europe and the United Kingdom 40,689 25.1
Others 1,822 1.1
Total 161,929 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1989
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 19,908 10.4 1
Poland 15,985 8.3 2
Philippines 11,383 5.9 3
Vietnam 9,425 4.9 4
India 8,819 4.6 5
United Kingdom 8,420 4.4 6
Portugal 8,189 4.3 7
United States 6,931 3.6 8
Lebanon 6,179 3.2 9
China 4,430 2.3 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 99,679 51.9
TOTAL — OTHERS 92,322 48.1
GRAND TOTAL 193,001 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1989
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 12,199 6.3
Asia and Pacific 93,261 48.6
South America 8,685 4.5
United States 6,931 3.6
Europe and the United Kingdom 52,107 27.1
North/Central America 5,870 3.1
Caribbean/Antilles 10,909 5.7
Others 2,041 1.1
Total 193,001 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1990
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 29,261 13.7 1
Poland 16,579 7.7 2
Lebanon 12,462 5.8 3
Philippines 12,042 5.6 4
India 10,624 5.1 5
Vietnam 9,081 4.2 6
United Kingdom 8,217 3.8 7
China 7,987 3.7 8
Portugal 7,917 3.7 9
United 6,084 2.8 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 120,256 56.1
TOTAL — OTHERS 93,974 43.9
GRAND TOTAL 214,230 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1990
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 13,440 6.3
Asia and Pacific 111,739 52.2
South America 8,898 4.2
United States 6,084 2.8
Europe and the United Kingdom 51,945 24.3
North/Central America 7,781 3.6
Caribbean/Antilles 11,689 5.5
Others 2,654 1.2
Total 214,230 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1991
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 22,340 9.7 1
Poland 15,731 6.8 2
China 13,915 6.0 3
India 12,848 5.6 4
Philippines 12,335 5.3 5
Lebanon 11,987 5.2 6
Vietnam 8,963 3.9 7
United Kingdom 7,543 3.3 8
El Salvador 6,977 3.0 9
Sri Lanka 6,826 3.0 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 119,465 51.8
TOTAL — OTHERS 111,316 48.2
GRAND TOTAL 230,781 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1991
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 16,087 7.0
Asia and Pacific 119,955 52.0
South America 10,582 4.6
United States 6,597 2.9
Europe and the United Kingdom 48,055 20.8
North/Central America 13,404 5.8
Caribbean/Antilles 12,922 5.6
Others 3,179 1.4
Total 230,781 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1992
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 38,910 15.4 1
Philippines 13,273 5.2 2
India 12,675 5.0 3
Sri Lanka 12,635 5.0 4
Poland 11,878 4.7 5
China 10,429 4.1 6
Vietnam 7,681 3.2 7
United States 7,537 3.0 8
Taiwan 7,456 2.9 9
United Kingdom 7,138 2.8 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 129,612 51.3
TOTAL — OTHERS 123,230 48.7
GRAND TOTAL 252,842 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1992
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 19,633 7.7
Asia and Pacific 139,216 54.4
South America 10,389 4.1
United States 7,537 2.9
Europe and the United Kingdom 44,871 17.5
North/Central America 12,526 4.9
Caribbean/Antilles 14,952 5.8
Others 3,718 1.5
Total 252,842 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1993
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 36,574 14.3 1
India 20,472 8.0 2
Philippines 19,772 7.7 3
Taiwan 9,867 3.9 4
China 9,466 3.7 5
Sri Lanka 9,103 3.6 6
Vietnam 8,301 3.2 7
United States 8,014 3.1 8
United Kingdom 7,159 2.8 9
Poland 6,877 2.7 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 135,605 53.0
TOTAL — OTHERS 120,214 47.0
GRAND TOTAL 255,819 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1993
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 16,918 6.6
Asia and Pacific 147,323 57.6
South America 9,580 3.7
United States 8,014 3.1
Europe and the United Kingdom 46,602 18.2
North/Central America 7,737 3.0
Caribbean/Antilles 16,563 6.5
Others 3,082 1.2
Total 255,819 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1994
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 44,169 19.7 1
Philippines 19,097 8.5 2
India 17,225 7.7 3
China 12,486 5.6 4
Taiwan 7,411 3.3 5
Sri Lanka 6,671 3.0 6
United States 6,234 2.8 7
Vietnam 6,230 2.8 8
United Kingdom 5,971 2.8 9
Bosnia-Hercegovina 4,905 2.2 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 130,399 58.2
TOTAL — OTHERS 93,476 41.8
GRAND TOTAL 223,875 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1994
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 13,706 6.1
Asia and Pacific 141,587 63.2
South America 7,919 3.5
United States 6,234 2.8
Europe and the United Kingdom 38,641 17.3
North/Central America 3,503 1.6
Caribbean/Antilles 9,980 4.5
Others 2,215 1.0
Total 223,875 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1995
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 31,746 14.9 1
India 16,215 7.6 2
Philippines 15,149 7.1 3
China 13,291 6.3 4
Sri Lanka 8,926 4.2 5
Taiwan 7,691 3.6 6
Bosnia-Hercegovina 6,270 3.0 7
United Kingdom 6,161 2.9 8
United States 5,185 2.4 9
Pakistan 3,996 1.9 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 114,630 53.9
TOTAL — OTHERS 97,874 46.1
GRAND TOTAL 212,504 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1995
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 14,631 6.9
Asia and Pacific 129,106 60.8
South America 7,538 3.5
United States 5,185 2.4
Europe and the United Kingdom 41,266 19.4
North/Central America 2,842 1.3
Caribbean/Antilles 10,056 4.5
Others 1,880 0.8
Total 212,504 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1996
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 29,966 13.3 1
India 21,276 9.4 2
China 17,516 7.8 3
Taiwan 13,207 5.8 4
Philippines 13,132 5.8 5
Pakistan 7,753 3.4 6
Sri Lanka 6,151 2.7 7
United States 5,837 2.6 8
Iran 5,828 2.6 9
United Kingdom 5,585 2.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 126,251 55.9
TOTAL — OTHERS 99,522 44.1
GRAND TOTAL 225,773 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1996
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 36,503 16.15
Asia and Pacific 124,771 55.20
South and Central America 18,878 8.35
United States 5,869 2.60
Europe and the United Kingdom 40,009 17.70
Not Stated 20 0.01
Total 225,773 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1997
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 22,242 10.30 1
India 19,614 9.08 2
China 18,530 8.58 3
Taiwan 13,321 6.17 4
Pakistan 11,233 5.20 5
Philippines 10,873 5.03 6
Iran 7,477 3.46 7
Sri Lanka 5,069 2.35 8
United States 5,043 2.33 9
United Kingdom 4,659 2.16 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 118,061 54.65
TOTAL — OTHERS 97,983 45.35
GRAND TOTAL 216,044 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1997
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 37,794 17.49
Asia and Pacific 117,076 54.19
South and Central America 17,425 8.07
United States 5,043 2.33
Europe and the United Kingdom 38,673 17.90
Not Stated 33 0.02
Total 216,044 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1998
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 19,749 11.34 1
India 11.34 8.80 2
Philippines 8,172 4.69 3
Hong Kong 8,083 4.64 4
Pakistan 8,081 4.64 5
Taiwan 7,164 4.11 6
Iran 6,772 3.89 7
South Korea 4,910 2.82 8
United States 4,764 2.74 9
Russia 4,299 2.47 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 87,321 50.16
TOTAL — OTHERS 86,779 49.84
GRAND TOTAL 174,100 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1998
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 32,534 18.69
Asia and Pacific 84,036 48.27
South and Central America 14,003 8.04
United States 4,764 2.74
Europe and the United Kingdom 38,477 22.10
Not Stated 286 0.16
Total 174,100 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1999
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 29,095 15.33 1
India 17,415 9.17 2
Pakistan 9,285 4.89 3
Philippines 9,285 4.89 4
South Korea 7,212 3.80 5
Iran 5,903 3.11 6
United States 5,514 2.90 7
Taiwan 5,461 2.88 8
Sri Lanka 4,719 2.49 9
United Kingdom 4,476 2.36 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 98,240 51.76
TOTAL — OTHERS 91,576 48.24
GRAND TOTAL 189,816 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1999
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 33,441 17.62
Asia and Pacific 96,370 50.77
South and Central America 15,188 8.00
United States 5,514 2.90
Europe and the United Kingdom 38,912 20.50
Not Stated 391 0.21
Total 189,816 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 2000
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 36,715 16.15 1
India 26,086 11.48 2
Pakistan 14,182 6.24 3
Philippines 10,086 4.44 4
South Korea 7,626 3.35 5
Sri Lanka 5,841 2.57 6
United States 5,814 2.56 7
Iran 5,608 2.47 8
Yugoslavia 4,723 2.08 9
United Kingdom 4,647 2.04 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 121,328 53.38
TOTAL — OTHERS 105,985 46.62
GRAND TOTAL 227,313 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 2000
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 40,815 17.96
Asia and Pacific 120,539 53.03
South and Central America 16,944 7.45
United States 5,814 2.56
Europe and the United Kingdom 42,885 18.87
Not Stated 316 0.14
Total 227,313 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 2001
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 40,315 16.09 1
India 27,848 11.12 2
Pakistan 15,341 6.12 3
Philippines 12,914 5.16 4
South Korea 9,604 3.83 5
United States 5,902 2.36 6
Iran 5,737 2.29 7
Romania 5,585 2.23 8
Sri Lanka 5,514 2.20 9
United Kingdom 5,350 2.14 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 134,110 53.54
TOTAL — OTHERS 116,374 46.46
GRAND TOTAL 250,484 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 2001
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 48,078 19.20
Asia and Pacific 132,711 53.01
South and Central America 20,129 8.04
United States 5,894 2.35
Europe and the United Kingdom 43,204 17.26
Not Stated 330 0.13
Total 250,346 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 2002
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 33,231 14.51 1
India 28,815 12.58 2
Pakistan 14,164 6.18 3
Philippines 11,000 4.80 4
Iran 7,742 3.38 5
South Korea 7,326 3.20 6
Romania 5,692 2.48 7
United States 5,288 2.31 8
Sri Lanka 4,961 2.17 9
United Kingdom 4,720 2.06 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 122,939 53.67
TOTAL — OTHERS 106,152 46.33
GRAND TOTAL 229,091 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 2002
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 46,113 20.13
Asia and Pacific 118,899 51.90
South and Central America 19,417 8.48
United States 5,288 2.31
Europe and the United Kingdom 38,841 16.95
Not Stated 533 0.23
Total 229,091 100

https://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.505817/publication.html
Source for 1995/1996:
Source for 1996-1998

(Page 18 of the 2004 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 24 of the 2005 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 18, 19 of the 2006 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 19, 20 of the 2007 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 21, 22 of the 2008 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 16 of the 2009 Annual Report to Parliament)

PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 2008
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 51,313 20.8
Asia and Pacific 117,480 47.5
South and Central America 26,493 10.7
United States 11,216 4.5
Europe and the United Kingdom 40,649 16.4
Not Stated 96 0.0
Total 247,247 100

(Page 14 of the 2010 Annual Report to Parliament)

PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 2009
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 56,151 22.2
Asia and Pacific 117,174 46.5
South and Central America 26,776 10.6
United States 9,723 3.9
Europe and the United Kingdom 42,311 16.8
Not Stated 37 0.0
Total 252,172 100

(Page 18 of the 2011 Annual Report to Parliament)

PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 2010
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 66,692 23.8
Asia and Pacific 135,008 48.1
South and Central America 28,357 10.1
United States 9,242 3.3
Europe and the United Kingdom 41,317 14.7
Not Stated 73 0.0
Total 280,689 100

(Page 15 of the 2012 Annual Report to Parliament)

PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 2011
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 59,323 23.8
Asia and Pacific 120,330 48.4
South and Central America 27,447 11.0
United States 8,830 3.5
Europe and the United Kingdom 32,755 13.2
Not Stated 63 0.0
Total 248,748 100

(Page 19 of the 2013 Annual Report to Parliament)

PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 2012
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 56,060 21.7
Asia and Pacific 129,592 50.3
South and Central America 26,864 10.4
United States 9,414 3.7
Europe and the United Kingdom 35,828 13.9
Not Stated 129 0.0
Total 257,887 100

(Page 16 of the 2014 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 16 of the 2015 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 10 of the 2016 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 14 of the 2017 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 28 of the 2018 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 36 of the 2019 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 33 of the 2020 Annual Report to Parliament)

(Page 36 of the 2021 Annual Report to Parliament)

Are things starting to make sense? Immigration policies for the last 50+ years have focused on Asians and Africans, replacing (to a large degree) the overwhelmingly European makeup that was Canada for many years.

Of course, speaking up about what’s apparent will lead to cries of racism.

One thing people really need to get clear: so-called “conservatives” have no interest whatsoever in preserving demographics or the makeup of a country. They fully support the genocide agenda, but try to pitch it from a more economic perspective.

White replacement is a very real thing. Only the most obtuse or unobservant cannot see what’s going on, especially given how blatant it is..

While Liberals are generally quite open for their disdain of Europeans, “Conservatives” behave in a stealthier and more subversive manner. They camouflage their true intentions, making them more dangerous.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

4. Documents Provided By Canadian Government

(A.0) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/index.html
(A.1) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1966.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1966
(A.2) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1967.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1967
(A.3) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1968.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1968
(A.4) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1969.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1969
(A.5) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1970.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1970
(A.6) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1971.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1971
(A.7) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1972.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1972
(A.8) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1973.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1973
(A.9) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1974.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1974
(A.10) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1975.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1975
(A.11) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1976.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1976
(A.12) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1977.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1977
(A.13) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1978.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1978
(A.14) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1979.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1979
(A.15) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1980.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1980
(A.16) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1981.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1981
(A.17) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1982.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1982
(A.18) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1983.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1983
(A.19) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1984.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1984
(A.20) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1985.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1985
(A.21) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1986.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1986
(A.22) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1987.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1987
(A.23) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1988.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1988
(A.24) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1989.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1989
(A.25) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1990.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1990
(A.26) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1991.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1991
(A.27) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1992.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1992
(A.28) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1993.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1993
(A.29) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1994.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1994
(A.30) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1995.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1995
(A.31) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1996.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1996

(B.0) https://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.505817/publication.html
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/reports-statistics/statistics-open-data.html
(B.1) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/cic/MP43-333-1999-eng.pdf
Canada Immigration Facts And Figures 1998
(B.2) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/MP43-333-2000E.pdf
(B.3) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/MP43-333-2002E.pdf
(B.4) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/cic/Ci1-8-2003-eng.pdf
(B.5) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/Ci1-8-2004E.pdf
(B.6) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/Ci1-8-2005E.pdf
(B.7) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2009/cic/Ci1-8-2006E.pdf
(B.8) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2009/cic/Ci1-8-2007E.pdf
(B.9) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2009/cic/Ci1-8-2008E.pdf
(B.10) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/cic/Ci1-8-2009-eng.pdf
(B.11) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2011/cic/Ci1-8-2010-eng.pdf
(B.12) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2013/cic/Ci1-8-2011-eng.pdf
(B.13) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2013/cic/Ci1-8-2012-eng.pdf
(B.14) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2015/cic/Ci1-8-9-2013-eng.pdf
(B.15) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2015/cic/Ci1-8-9-2014-eng.pdf

(C.0) Parliament Report Index
http://archive.is/vwM6G
(C.1) 2004 Report to Canadian Parliament
2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.2) 2005 Report to Canadian Parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.3) 2006 Report to Canadian Parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.4) 2007 Report to Canadian Parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.5) 2008 Report to Canadian Parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.6) 2009 report to Canadian Parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.7) 2010 Report to Canadian Parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.8) 2011 Report to Canadian Parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.9) 2012 Report to Canadian Parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.10) 2013 Report to Canadian Parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.11) 2014 Report to Canadian Parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.12) 2015 Report to Canadian Parliament
2015.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.13) 2016 Report to Canadian Parliament
2016.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.14) 2017 Report to Canadian Parliament
2017.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15) 2018 Report to CDN Parliament
2018.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15.2) 2019-2021 Supplemental Report
http://archive.is/onyev
(C.16) 2019 Report to Canadian Parliament
2019.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.17) 2020 Report to Canadian Parliament
2020.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.18) 2021 Report to Canadian Parliament
2021.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament

Pluralism Is A Policy Of Population Replacement

Recently, “Conservative” Michelle Rempel-Garner posted on Twitter calling for (presumably) her party to adopt the policy of “pluralism”. Sounds lovely, doesn’t it. But what is pluralism really?

Merriam-Webster defines pluralism as: “a state of society in which members of diverse ethnic, racial, religious, or social groups maintain and develop their traditional culture or special interest within the confines of a common civilization”.

It has nothing to do with assimilation. Instead, it’s discouraged.

Furthermore, the definition also includes “a concept, doctrine, or policy advocating this state [of pluralism]”. Let the word games begin now….

[1] Liberals promote policies of “diversity”.
[2] Conservatives promote policies of “pluralism”.

But in the end, these are the same things. If you’re championing pluralism, you’re championing diversity. This leads to society being carved up and balkanized along various identity groups.

Since these people are all U.N. puppets, here’s something else that’s worth addressing. There are different ways to advocate for genocide.

Article I
The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.

Article II
In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:
(a) Killing members of the group;
(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

Article III
The following acts shall be punishable:
(a) Genocide;
(b) Conspiracy to commit genocide;
(c) Direct and public incitement to commit genocide;
(d) Attempt to commit genocide;
(e) Complicity in genocide.

Article IV
Persons committing genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III shall be punished, whether they are constitutionally responsible rulers, public officials or private individuals.

Article V
The Contracting Parties undertake to enact, in accordance with their respective Constitutions, the necessary legislation to give effect to the provisions of the present Convention, and, in particular, to provide effective penalties for persons guilty of genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III.

It’s also worth asking if pluralism (imposed without the consent of the people) would amount to genocide under the terms as laid out by the U.N. in the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide After all, if pluralism results in at least a partial replacement of a group, isn’t that bringing about its destruction?

These policies are pushed in Western countries, and only in Western countries. This means that the consequences are deliberate.

Endorsing the globohomo agenda also seems to be part of conservatism these days, which shows just how far things have fallen.

Rempel supports pluralism, which is essentially state-imposed diversity. And how exactly does one make a country more diverse? Quite simply, you have to replace (or displace) at least a portion of the local population in order to make room for the new arrivals.

Now, are conservatives proud of this?

After all, if forced diversity is something that everyone’s on board with, doesn’t that lend credence to the notion that whites are being replaced?

Rempel did explain herself more fully:

That was not the first or the last time I have had to counter that particular racist diatribe. It is a core tenet of so-called “great replacement theory”; an anti-Semitic white-nationalist conspiracy theory involving a supposed plot to replace white people with non-whites.

The narrative it usually follows is that the immigration policy of western countries is designed to replace whites, or to “out breed them,” in order to prevent whites from getting jobs, dominating culture, or electing a “pro-white” government. It is racism built on longstanding colonial and white nationalist dogma that never truly has been erased, even after decades spent building pluralistic policy.

It is pure ignorance to believe that white replacement dogma doesn’t exist in Canada.

In a wink to this sentiment, some right leaning political candidates in recent years, both at the federal and provincial levels, have promised to “lower immigration levels” without explaining what benefit this would bring to Canada.

On May 18, 2022, Rempel wrote a piece that appeared in the National Post, denouncing “White Replacement Theory” as the paranoid rantings of racists. She condemns such conspiracies, and calls for people who endorse it to be removed from the party.

A serious question to ask: how can a Member of Parliament openly call for the creation of a “pluralistic” society, but condemn any talk of “white replacement”?

Do these people simply object to their ideals being explained as what they really are?

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

(1) https://twitter.com/MichelleRempel/status/1517246163828846597
(2) https://twitter.com/MichelleRempel/status/1527006649059254273
(3) https://nationalpost.com/opinion/michelle-rempel-garner-we-have-a-duty-to-reject-conspiracy-theories-about-white-replacement
(4) https://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pluralism
(5) https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/documents/atrocity-crimes/Doc.1_Convention%20on%20the%20Prevention%20and%20Punishment%20of%20the%20Crime%20of%20Genocide.pdf

Replacement Migration In Canada: The Years 1989 To 1998

The Kalergi Plan was laid out for Europe a century ago. The goal was to ultimately get rid of all the whites, with a combination of open doors immigration, depressed local birth rates, and miscegenation. That said, the plot is not limited to Europe, but to all white countries.

Forced diversity is code for genocide.

1. Mass LEGAL Immigration In Canada

Despite what many think, LEGAL immigration into Canada is actually a much larger threat than illegal aliens, given the true scale of the replacement that is happening. What was founded as a European (British) colony is becoming unrecognizable due to forced demographic changes. There are also social, economic, environmental and voting changes to consider. See this Canadian series, and the UN programs for more detail. Politicians, the media, and so-called “experts” have no interest in coming clean on this.

CLICK HERE, for UN Genocide Prevention/Punishment Convention.
CLICK HERE, for Barcelona Declaration & Kalergi Plan.
CLICK HERE, for UN Kalergi Plan (population replacement).
CLICK HERE, for UN replacement efforts since 1974.
CLICK HERE, for tracing steps of UN replacement agenda.

Note: If there are errors in calculating the totals, please speak up. Information is of no use to the public if it isn’t accurate.

2. Genocidal Population Replacement Long Time Problem

Let’s have a look at some of those recent years. While 2003 to 2020 has already been covered pretty extensively on this site, the problem extends much further than that.

PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1989
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 19,908 10.4 1
Poland 15,985 8.3 2
Philippines 11,383 5.9 3
Vietnam 9,425 4.9 4
India 8,819 4.6 5
United Kingdom 8,420 4.4 6
Portugal 8,189 4.3 7
United States 6,931 3.6 8
Lebanon 6,179 3.2 9
China 4,430 2.3 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 99,679 51.9
TOTAL — OTHERS 92,322 48.1
GRAND TOTAL 193,001 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1989
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 12,199 6.3
Asia and Pacific 93,261 48.6
South America 8,685 4.5
United States 6,931 3.6
Europe and the United Kingdom 52,107 27.1
North/Central America 5,870 3.1
Caribbean/Antilles 10,909 5.7
Others 2,041 1.1
Total 193,001 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1990
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 29,261 13.7 1
Poland 16,579 7.7 2
Lebanon 12,462 5.8 3
Philippines 12,042 5.6 4
India 10,624 5.1 5
Vietnam 9,081 4.2 6
United Kingdom 8,217 3.8 7
China 7,987 3.7 8
Portugal 7,917 3.7 9
United 6,084 2.8 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 120,256 56.1
TOTAL — OTHERS 93,974 43.9
GRAND TOTAL 214,230 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1990
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 13,440 6.3
Asia and Pacific 111,739 52.2
South America 8,898 4.2
United States 6,084 2.8
Europe and the United Kingdom 51,945 24.3
North/Central America 7,781 3.6
Caribbean/Antilles 11,689 5.5
Others 2,654 1.2
Total 214,230 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1991
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 22,340 9.7 1
Poland 15,731 6.8 2
China 13,915 6.0 3
India 12,848 5.6 4
Philippines 12,335 5.3 5
Lebanon 11,987 5.2 6
Vietnam 8,963 3.9 7
United Kingdom 7,543 3.3 8
El Salvador 6,977 3.0 9
Sri Lanka 6,826 3.0 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 119,465 51.8
TOTAL — OTHERS 111,316 48.2
GRAND TOTAL 230,781 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1991
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 16,087 7.0
Asia and Pacific 119,955 52.0
South America 10,582 4.6
United States 6,597 2.9
Europe and the United Kingdom 48,055 20.8
North/Central America 13,404 5.8
Caribbean/Antilles 12,922 5.6
Others 3,179 1.4
Total 230,781 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1992
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 38,910 15.4 1
Philippines 13,273 5.2 2
India 12,675 5.0 3
Sri Lanka 12,635 5.0 4
Poland 11,878 4.7 5
China 10,429 4.1 6
Vietnam 7,681 3.2 7
United States 7,537 3.0 8
Taiwan 7,456 2.9 9
United Kingdom 7,138 2.8 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 129,612 51.3
TOTAL — OTHERS 123,230 48.7
GRAND TOTAL 252,842 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1992
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 19,633 7.7
Asia and Pacific 139,216 54.4
South America 10,389 4.1
United States 7,537 2.9
Europe and the United Kingdom 44,871 17.5
North/Central America 12,526 4.9
Caribbean/Antilles 14,952 5.8
Others 3,718 1.5
Total 252,842 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1993
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 36,574 14.3 1
India 20,472 8.0 2
Philippines 19,772 7.7 3
Taiwan 9,867 3.9 4
China 9,466 3.7 5
Sri Lanka 9,103 3.6 6
Vietnam 8,301 3.2 7
United States 8,014 3.1 8
United Kingdom 7,159 2.8 9
Poland 6,877 2.7 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 135,605 53.0
TOTAL — OTHERS 120,214 47.0
GRAND TOTAL 255,819 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1993
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 16,918 6.6
Asia and Pacific 147,323 57.6
South America 9,580 3.7
United States 8,014 3.1
Europe and the United Kingdom 46,602 18.2
North/Central America 7,737 3.0
Caribbean/Antilles 16,563 6.5
Others 3,082 1.2
Total 255,819 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1994
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 44,169 19.7 1
Philippines 19,097 8.5 2
India 17,225 7.7 3
China 12,486 5.6 4
Taiwan 7,411 3.3 5
Sri Lanka 6,671 3.0 6
United States 6,234 2.8 7
Vietnam 6,230 2.8 8
United Kingdom 5,971 2.8 9
Bosnia-Hercegovina 4,905 2.2 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 130,399 58.2
TOTAL — OTHERS 93,476 41.8
GRAND TOTAL 223,875 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1994
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 13,706 6.1
Asia and Pacific 141,587 63.2
South America 7,919 3.5
United States 6,234 2.8
Europe and the United Kingdom 38,641 17.3
North/Central America 3,503 1.6
Caribbean/Antilles 9,980 4.5
Others 2,215 1.0
Total 223,875 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1995
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 31,746 14.9 1
India 16,215 7.6 2
Philippines 15,149 7.1 3
China 13,291 6.3 4
Sri Lanka 8,926 4.2 5
Taiwan 7,691 3.6 6
Bosnia-Hercegovina 6,270 3.0 7
United Kingdom 6,161 2.9 8
United States 5,185 2.4 9
Pakistan 3,996 1.9 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 114,630 53.9
TOTAL — OTHERS 97,874 46.1
GRAND TOTAL 212,504 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1995
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 14,631 6.9
Asia and Pacific 129,106 60.8
South America 7,538 3.5
United States 5,185 2.4
Europe and the United Kingdom 41,266 19.4
North/Central America 2,842 1.3
Caribbean/Antilles 10,056 4.5
Others 1,880 0.8
Total 212,504 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1996
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 29,966 13.3 1
India 21,276 9.4 2
China 17,516 7.8 3
Taiwan 13,207 5.8 4
Philippines 13,132 5.8 5
Pakistan 7,753 3.4 6
Sri Lanka 6,151 2.7 7
United States 5,837 2.6 8
Iran 5,828 2.6 9
United Kingdom 5,585 2.5 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 126,251 55.9
TOTAL — OTHERS 99,522 44.1
GRAND TOTAL 225,773 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1996
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 36,503 16.15
Asia and Pacific 124,771 55.20
South and Central America 18,878 8.35
United States 5,869 2.60
Europe and the United Kingdom 40,009 17.70
Not Stated 20 0.01
Total 225,773 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1997
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
Hong Kong 22,242 10.30 1
India 19,614 9.08 2
China 18,530 8.58 3
Taiwan 13,321 6.17 4
Pakistan 11,233 5.20 5
Philippines 10,873 5.03 6
Iran 7,477 3.46 7
Sri Lanka 5,069 2.35 8
United States 5,043 2.33 9
United Kingdom 4,659 2.16 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 118,061 54.65
TOTAL — OTHERS 97,983 45.35
GRAND TOTAL 216,044 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1997
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 37,794 17.49
Asia and Pacific 117,076 54.19
South and Central America 17,425 8.07
United States 5,043 2.33
Europe and the United Kingdom 38,673 17.90
Not Stated 33 0.02
Total 216,044 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS IN YEAR 1998
SOURCE COUNTRY NUMBER PERCENTAGE RANK
China 19,749 11.34 1
India 11.34 8.80 2
Philippines 8,172 4.69 3
Hong Kong 8,083 4.64 4
Pakistan 8,081 4.64 5
Taiwan 7,164 4.11 6
Iran 6,772 3.89 7
South Korea 4,910 2.82 8
United States 4,764 2.74 9
Russia 4,299 2.47 10
TOTAL — TOP 10 87,321 50.16
TOTAL — OTHERS 86,779 49.84
GRAND TOTAL 174,100 100
PERMANENT RESIDENTS ADMITTED BY REGION IN 1998
REGION NUMBER PERCENTAGE
Africa and the Middle East 32,534 18.69
Asia and Pacific 84,036 48.27
South and Central America 14,003 8.04
United States 4,764 2.74
Europe and the United Kingdom 38,477 22.10
Not Stated 286 0.16
Total 174,100 100

Source for 1995/1996:
Source for 1996-1998

Are things starting to make sense? Immigration policies for the last 50+ years have focused on Asians and Africans, replacing (to a large degree) the overwhelmingly European makeup that was Canada for many years.

Of course, speaking up about what’s apparent will lead to cries of racism.

One thing people really need to get clear: so-called “conservatives” have no interest whatsoever in preserving demographics or the makeup of a country. They fully support the genocide agenda, but try to pitch it from a more economic perspective.

White replacement is a very real thing. Only the most obtuse or unobservant cannot see what’s going on, especially given how blatant it is..

While Liberals are generally quite open for their disdain of Europeans, “Conservatives” behave in a stealthier and more subversive manner. They camouflage their true intentions, making them more dangerous.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

3. Documents Provided By Canadian Government

(A.0) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/index.html
(A.1) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1966.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1966
(A.2) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1967.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1967
(A.3) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1968.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1968
(A.4) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1969.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1969
(A.5) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1970.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1970
(A.6) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1971.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1971
(A.7) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1972.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1972
(A.8) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1973.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1973
(A.9) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1974.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1974
(A.10) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1975.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1975
(A.11) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1976.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1976
(A.12) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1977.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1977
(A.13) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1978.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1978
(A.14) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1979.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1979
(A.15) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1980.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1980
(A.16) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1981.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1981
(A.17) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1982.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1982
(A.18) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1983.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1983
(A.19) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1984.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1984
(A.20) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1985.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1985
(A.21) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1986.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1986
(A.22) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1987.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1987
(A.23) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1988.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1988
(A.24) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1989.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1989
(A.25) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1990.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1990
(A.26) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1991.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1991
(A.27) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1992.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1992
(A.28) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1993.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1993
(A.29) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1994.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1994
(A.30) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1995.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1995
(A.31) https://epe.lac-bac.gc.ca/100/202/301/immigration_statistics-ef/mp22-1_1996.pdf
Canada Immigration Statistics 1996

(B.0) https://publications.gc.ca/site/eng/9.505817/publication.html
https://www.canada.ca/en/immigration-refugees-citizenship/corporate/reports-statistics/statistics-open-data.html
(B.1) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2010/cic/MP43-333-1999-eng.pdf
Canada Immigration Facts And Figures 1998
(B.2) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/Collection/MP43-333-2000E.pdf

(C.0) Parliament Report Index
http://archive.is/vwM6G
(C.1) 2004 Report to Canadian Parliament
2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.2) 2005 Report to Canadian Parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.3) 2006 Report to Canadian Parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.4) 2007 Report to Canadian Parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.5) 2008 Report to Canadian Parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.6) 2009 report to Canadian Parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.7) 2010 Report to Canadian Parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.8) 2011 Report to Canadian Parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.9) 2012 Report to Canadian Parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.10) 2013 Report to Canadian Parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.11) 2014 Report to Canadian Parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.12) 2015 Report to Canadian Parliament
2015.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.13) 2016 Report to Canadian Parliament
2016.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.14) 2017 Report to Canadian Parliament
2017.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15) 2018 Report to CDN Parliament
2018.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.15.2) 2019-2021 Supplemental Report
http://archive.is/onyev
(C.16) 2019 Report to Canadian Parliament
2019.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.17) 2020 Report to Canadian Parliament
2020.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
(C.18) 2021 Report to Canadian Parliament
2021.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament

Canada Before 1970: Growing A Population Without Replacing It

In Western societies, there seems to be the mentality that populations must always grow. Furthermore, large numbers of people from very different backgrounds should be brought in to make this happen. At least, this is what public figures and media heads say, regardless of what the citizens want.

That being said, this “diversity” push is something that has only existed for the last 50 years or so. Before that, there was a focus on maintaining the demographic makeup. Let’s take a look.

A good starting place would be to see how many people are coming to Canada every year. Although this doesn’t tell the entire story, the numbers of Permanent Residents is a good place to start.

YEAR PERMANENT RESIDENTS % OF POPULATION
1852 29,307
1853 29,464
1854 37,263
1855 25,296
1856 22,544
1857 33,854
1858 12,339
1859 6,300
1860 6,276 0.2
1861 13,589 0.4
1862 18,294 0.6
1863 21,000 0.6
1864 24,779 0.7
1865 18,958 0.6
1866 11,427 0.3
1867 10,666 0.3
1868 12,765 0.4
1869 18,630 0.5
1870 24,706 0.7
1871 27,773 0.8
1872 36,578 1.0
1873 50,050 1.3
1874 39,373 1.0
1875 27,382 0.7
1876 25,633 0.6
1877 27,082 0.7
1878 29,807 0.7
1879 40,492 1.0
1880 38,505 0.9
1881 47,991 1.1
1882 112,458 2.6
1883 133,624 3.0
1884 103,824 2.3
1885 76,169 1.7
1886 69,152 1.5
1887 84,526 1.8
1888 88,766 1.9
1889 91,600 1.9
1890 75,067 1.6
1891 82,165 1.7
1892 30,996 0.6
1893 29,633 0.6
1894 20,829 0.4
1895 18,790 0.4
1896 16,835 0.3
1897 21,716 0.4
1898 31,900 0.6
1899 44,543 0.9
1900 41,681 0.8
1901 55,747 1.0
1902 89,102 1.6
1903 138,660 2.5
1904 131,252 2.3
1905 141,465 2.4
1906 211,653 5.3
1907 272,409 4.2
1908 143,326 2.2
1909 173,694 2.6
1910 286,839 4.1
1911 331,288 4.6
1912 375,756 5.1
1913 400,870 5.3
1914 150,484 1.9
1915 33,665 0.4
1916 55,914 0.7
1917 72,910 0.9
1918 41,845 0.5
1919 107,698 1.3
1920 138,824 1.6
1921 91,728 1.0
1922 64,224 0.7
1923 133,729 1.5
1924 124,164 1.4
1925 84,907 0.9
1926 135,982 1.4
1927 158,886 1.6
1928 166,783 1.7
1929 164,993 1.6
1930 104,806 1.0
1931 27,530 0.3
1932 20,591 0.2
1933 14,382 0.1
1934 12,476 0.1
1935 11,277 0.1
1936 11,643 0.1
1937 15,101 0.1
1938 17,244 0.2
1939 16,994 0.2
1940 11,324 0.1
1941 9,329 0.1
1942 7,576 0.1
1943 8,504 0.1
1944 12,801 0.1
1945 22,722 0.2
1946 71,719 0.6
1947 64,127 0.5
1948 125,414 1.0
1949 95,217 0.7
1950 73,912 0.5
1951 194,391 1.4
1952 164,498 1.1
1953 168,868 1.1
1954 154,227 1.0
1955 109,946 0.7
1956 164,857 1.0
1957 282,164 1.7
1958 124,851 0.7
1959 106,928 0.6
1960 104,111 0.6
1961 71,698 0.4
1962 74,856 0.4
1963 93,151 0.5
1964 112,606 0.6
1965 146,758 0.7
1966 194,743 1.0
1967 222,876 1.1
1968 183,974 0.9
1969 164,531 0.8
1970 147,713 0.7
1971 121,900 0.6
1972 122,006 0.6
1973 184,200 0.8
1974 218,465 1.0
1975 187,881 0.8
1976 149,429 0.6
1977 114,914 0.5
1978 86,313 0.4
1979 112,093 0.5
1980 43,137 0.6
1981 128,641 0.5
1982 121,175 0.5
1983 89,186 0.4
1984 88,272 0.3
1985 84,347 0.3
1986 99,355 0.4
1987 152,079 0.6
1988 161,588 0.6
1989 191,555 0.7
1990 86,452 0.6
1991 232,806 0.8
1992 254,790 0.9
1993 256,641 0.9
1994 224,385 0.8
1995 212,865 0.7
1996 226,071 0.8
1997 216,035 0.7
1998 174,195 0.6
1999 189,951 0.6
2000 227,456 0.7
2001 250,637 0.8
2002 229,048 0.7
2003 221,349 0.7
2004 235,823 0.7
2005 262,242 0.8
2006 251,640 0.8
2007 236,753 0.7
2008 247,247 0.7
2009 252,172 0.7
2010 280,689 0.8
2011 248,748 0.7
2012 257,887 0.7

Source for this chart is that data provided on page 3. Also, data for some earlier years is provided by Statistics Canada.

Even though large numbers of people have been coming to Canada for a long time, there was still a lot of social cohesion. This is because migrants were primarily selected from countries with a very similar makeup and composition.

Historically, the numeric predominance of those of British and French origin was unquestionable. Before the great wave of European migration to Canada between 1896 and the beginning of the First World War, Canada’s population was indeed mainly made up of those of British and French origin. For example, the 1871 Census of Canada shows that 60 percent of Canada’s 3.5 million people were of British origin, and 30 percent French origin; Europeans not of British nor French origin accounted for only 7 percent of Canada’s population in 1871 as well as in 1881 (Kalbach, 1990: 24). This demographic composition basically persisted until the turn of the century.

The wave of immigration to Canada prior to the First World War began to increase the stock of Europeans not from British or French origin. Between 1896 and 1914, over three million immigrants came to Canada. When the supply of emigrants from England and Western Europe was dwindling, Canada began accepting people from Eastern and Southern Europe, including Poles, Ukrainians, Hutterites and Doukhobors. In the period between the two world wars from 1915 to 1945, another two million immigrants came to Canada (Statistics Canada, 1983: A125-163).

The census data of Canada indicate that Canadians of European origin other than British and French increased from 8.5 percent of the total population in 1901 to 14.2 percent in 1921, and to 17.8 percent in 1941 (Kalbach, 1990: 24). In contrast, Canadians of British origin declined in relative terms from 57 percent of the total population in 1901 to 50 percent in 1941, but those of French origin remained at around 30 percent of the total population in 1901 and in 1941. In short, if the composition of Canadians of European origin other than British and French is used as an indicator of ethnic plurality, then there was an increase in diversity between 1901 and 1941. However, Canada’s population in 1941, as in 1871, was made up of people mainly of European origin, which accounted for 98 percent of the total population in 1941 and in 1871, despite the fact that the population had increased from 3.5 million people in 1871 to 11.5 million people in 1941.

The Government of Canada openly admits that traditionally, the bulk of immigration came from Europe. More specifically, it came from the West, from places like Britain and France. (See archive).

And what was the result of this? Very little in terms of enclaves or balkanization. The population grew, but without the genocidal “multicultural” push that goes around now. This type of system focused on cultural compatibility, something that would be unthinkable today.

TIME PERIOD REGION # OF MIGRANTS % OF TOTAL
1968-1972 Europe 387,670 52.6
United States 114,615 15.5
Central/South America 24,863 3.4
Carribean 53,100 7.2
Asia 112,584 15.3
Africa 22,014 3
Australia 18,656 2.5
Oceania 0 0
Not Stated 3,622 0.5
Total 737,124 100
1973-1977 Europe 324,131 37.9
United States 102,141 11.9
Central/South America 63,598 7.4
Asia 216,837 25.4
Africa 42,748 5
Australia 10,870 1.3
Oceania 7,937 0.9
Not Stated 0 0
Total 854,889 100
1978-1982 Europe 196,546 33.2
United States 49,407 8.4
Central/South America 36,262 6.1
Carribean 39,362 6.7
Asia 236,596 40
Africa 21,946 3.7
Australia 6,438 1.1
Oceania 4,502 0.8
Not Stated 232 0
Total 591,291 100
1983-1987 Europe 124.344 24.42
United States 36,214 7.1
Central/South America 56,442 11
Carribean 39,079 7.6
Asia 226,326 44.1
Africa 24,027 4.7
Australia 2,774 0.5
Oceania 3,771 0.7
Not Stated 38 0
Total 513,015 100
1988-1992 Europe 237,666 22.6
United States 33,686 3.2
Central/South America 91,061 8.7
Carribean 59,911 5.7
Asia 545,410 51.9
Africa 70,744 6.7
Australia 4,771 0.5
Oceania 8,534 0.8
Not Stated 0 0
Total 1,051,783 100
1993-1995 Europe 126,509 18.3
United States 19,433 2.8
Central/South America 39,199 5.7
Carribean 36,599 5.3
Asia 418,016 60.4
Africa 45,255 6.5
Australia 3,476 0.5
Oceania 3,791 0.5
Not Stated 0 0
Total 692,198 100

The Government’s own data tables show just how rapidly the source countries have been shifting. While immigration to Canada used to mainly be from Europe, it’s now overwhelmingly Asian. Looking at the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament in recent years, this trend has only gotten worse.

Now, were the voters ever asked if they wanted to become minorities?

Article I
The Contracting Parties confirm that genocide, whether committed in time of peace or in time of war, is a crime under international law which they undertake to prevent and to punish.

Article II
In the present Convention, genocide means any of the following acts committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such:
(a) Killing members of the group;
(b) Causing serious bodily or mental harm to members of the group;
(c) Deliberately inflicting on the group conditions of life calculated to bring about its physical destruction in whole or in part;
(d) Imposing measures intended to prevent births within the group;
(e) Forcibly transferring children of the group to another group.

Article III
The following acts shall be punishable:
(a) Genocide;
(b) Conspiracy to commit genocide;
(c) Direct and public incitement to commit genocide;
(d) Attempt to commit genocide;
(e) Complicity in genocide.

Article IV
Persons committing genocide or any of the other acts enumerated in article III shall be punished, whether they are constitutionally responsible rulers, public officials or private individuals.

A Government doesn’t have to round up and execute its citizens in order to commit genocide. Another way is to flood the country with large numbers of very different people, with the purpose and intent of diluting and erasing the host population. Instead of having a national identity, society becomes “multicultural”.

One caveat of course: the people coming in are encouraged to maintain their own identities, customs, traditions, and language. The populations being replaced are expected to endlessly accommodate that.

If a larger population is needed, it’s entirely possible to grow it organically. However, modern efforts across the West can best be explained as attempting to erase groups entirely.

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all major issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist or bigoted to discuss these hard truths.

(1) https://publications.gc.ca/collections/collection_2013/cic/Ci1-8-2012-eng.pdf
(2) https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-310-x/2011003/fig/fig3_1-2-eng.cfm
(3) https://justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/csj-sjc/jsp-sjp/rp02_8-dr02_8/t2.html
(4) https://archive.ph/QkUeu
(5) https://justice.gc.ca/eng/rp-pr/csj-sjc/jsp-sjp/rp02_8-dr02_8/p2.html
(6) https://archive.ph/PzcO3
(7) https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/genocide-convention.shtml
(8) https://www.un.org/en/genocideprevention/documents/atrocity-crimes/Doc.1_Convention%20on%20the%20Prevention%20and%20Punishment%20of%20the%20Crime%20of%20Genocide.pdf
(9) UN Convention On Punishing And Preventing Genocide

M-44: Parliament Votes To Accelerate TFW/Student-To-PR Pipeline

Motion M-44 has recently passed. The House of Commons voted to demand that the Trudeau Government come up with new ways to accelerate the transition of “temporary” foreign workers and international students into Permanent Residents.

The legislation was advanced by Liberal Randeep Sarai. This isn’t at all surprising, considering the largest group coming to Canada in recent years has been Indians.

The final vote was 324-0. This means each Member of Parliament who voted did so in favour of this Motion, regardless of partisan affiliation. Every single “Conservative” voted in favour of speeding up demographic replacement by supporting this.

Even worse: they condemn the truthful description of what’s happening as racist conspiracy theories.

It’s interesting that there’s no hurry by Federal politicians to get rid of masks or vaccine passports. However, all of Parliament agreed that there should be a plan within the next 4 months to expand and speed up pathways to creating more Permanent Residents.

MOTION TEXT
That, in the opinion of the House, the government should develop and publicly release within 120 days following the adoption of this motion a comprehensive plan to expand the economic immigration stream to allow workers of all skill levels to meet the full range of labour needs and pathways to permanent residency for temporary foreign workers, including international students, with significant Canadian work experience in sectors with persistent labour shortages, and such plan should incorporate the following elements:
.
(a) amending eligibility criteria under economic immigration programs to give more weight to significant in-Canada work experience and expand the eligible occupational categories and work experience at various skills levels;
.
(b) examining evidence and data gathered from recent programs such as Temporary Resident to Permanent Resident Pathway, Atlantic Immigration Program (AIP), Rural and Northern Immigration Program (RNIP), and Agri-Food Pilot, and Provincial Nominee Process (PNP);
.
(c) incorporating data on labour market and skills shortages to align policy on immigrant-selection with persistent labour gaps;
.
(d) assessing ways to increase geographic distribution of immigration and encourage immigrant retention in smaller communities, as well as increase Francophone immigration outside Quebec;
.
(e) identifying mechanisms for ensuring flexibility in immigration-selection tools to react quicker to changes in labour market needs and regional economic priorities; and
.
(f) specifically considering occupations and essential sectors that are underrepresented in current economic immigration programs, such as health services, caregivers, agriculture, manufacturing, service industry, trades, and transportation.

What specific sectors will be targeted? Included are: health services, caregivers, agriculture, manufacturing, service industry, trades, and transportation. Of course, it’s much easier to support a family if they are living in a country with a much lower cost of living.

Sure, one could argue that it’s just to demand a plan. However, Trudeau is extremely accommodating when it comes to finding new ways to bring people into Canada.

Another development saw the Government extend the work visas for graduates get extended by 18 months. Now, students who complete a diploma or degree are typically eligible for a 3 year open work visa (via the Post Graduate Work Program). For those involved, it effectively makes those permits 4 1/2 years. It’s unclear if this is just a one-off.

In 2020, the Government quietly made changes to allow people on student visas to work an unlimited amount of hours — while still in school. This policy existed to ensure that students were in fact focused on studying, and not just using it as a backdoor work permit. See page 12 of 2021 Report. Guess we’ll see if it ever goes back.

It seems unlikely that the average Canadian has any idea just how many students and “temporary” workers come to Canada. This should demonstrate the trend, at least for recent years.

Year Stu TFWP IMP Total
2003 61,293 82,151 143,444

2004 56,536 90,668 147,204

2005 57,476 99,146 156,622

2006 61,703 112,658 174,361

2007 64,636 165,198 229,834

2008 79,509 192,519 272,028

2009 85,140 178,478 263,618

2010 96,157 182,276 278,433

2011 98,383 190,842 289,225

2012 104,810 213,573 318,383

2013 111,865 221,310 333,175

2014 127,698 95,086 197,924 420,078

2015 219,143 73,016 175,967 468,126

2016 265,111 78,402 207,829 551,342

2017 317,328 78,788 224,033 620,149

2018 356,876 84,229 255,034 696,139

2019 402,427 98,310 306,797 807,534

2020 256,740 84,609 242,130 583,452

Stu = Student Visa
TFWP = Temporary Foreign Worker Program
IMP = International Mobility Program

Data for this table was compiled from the Annual Immigration Reports to Parliament, from 2004 through 2021. These cover the years 2003 to 2020. Keep in mind, this is just what’s on the books.

How many of them actually stay? It’s hard to say. Either the Government doesn’t keep data on this this, or they do, but just don’t make it easily available.

About the change from 2013 to 2014: the Harper Government got a lot of flack for flooding Canada with TFWs. The solution they came up with was not to reduce the number of them. Instead, they broke up the program into different areas to better conceal what was happening. This has been addressed elsewhere on this site.

Simply beyond pumping up the people who are getting PR status, the Canadian Parliament has also been holding hearings since February on the topic of boosting the number of international students coming in the first place.

More people coming + more staying = faster rate of change

The lie has been heavily promoted that it’s only 300,000 or 400,000 people coming to Canada per year. It’s not. Whether it’s ignorance or malice, very few report the truth, including those in alternative media. Here’s a recent review of the numbers in Canada. It’s shocking, or at least it should be.

While politicians here facilitate open borders, it’s worth mentioning that over 4.2 million babies have been aborted since 1970. Then of course, they’re feminism and the globohomo agenda doing a number on birth rates. The solution then becomes to bring more people over, to compensate for a declining population.

Are things starting to make sense now?

A little self promotion: Borderless Canada is still available online. Learn about what’s been going on in this country. Virtually all issues can be directly tied to immigration and border security, and it’s not racist to discuss hard truths.

(1) https://www.ourcommons.ca/members/en/89339/motions/11528727
(2) https://www.ourcommons.ca/members/en/randeep-sarai(89339)
(3) https://www.ourcommons.ca/Members/en/votes/44/1/85
(4) https://www.ourcommons.ca/Committees/en/CIMM/StudyActivity?studyActivityId=11473703
(5) https://kitchener.citynews.ca/national-news/federal-government-will-let-international-graduates-stay-in-canada-another-18-months-5291183
(6) https://www.cp24.com/news/tory-leadership-candidate-pierre-poilievre-denounces-white-replacement-theory-1.5906421

2004.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2005.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2006.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2007.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2008.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2009.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2010.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2011.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2012.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2013.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2014.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2015.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2016.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2017.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2018.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2019.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2020.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament
2021.annual.immigration.report.to.parliament

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