CV #42(D): WEF/Davos “Great Reset”, “Green New Deal”, And “Stakeholder Capitalism” Are Euphemisms For Global Communism

The “Great Reset” was initially dismissed as a conspiracy theory, and vehemently denied. Now, that it’s out in the open, it’s necessary to restructure society. Pretty opportunistic isn’t it? Wasn’t this all about a virus before? Or is it about implementing an agenda that couldn’t be sold politically before?

Truth about politicians, CEOs, academics and activists colluding is still considered a conspiracy theory. Give it time, and the narrative will shift again. Now there will have been collusion, but it was necessary.

1. WEF Gaslighting Public On Issue Of Trust

The participants at the World Economic Forum keep talking about having to build trust between people. However, this is completely disingenuous, considering the deception and lies at the heart of the matter. Here are important topics, in no particular order.

CENTRAL BANKING
Central Banks Pushing For Digital Currency Implementation
Global Taxation Efforts And Programs Underway
1934 Bank Of Canada Act, Bank For International Settlements
Bank For International Settlements Pushing Green Bonds
Central Banks Network For Greening The Financial System
Usury Involved In Debt-For-Nature Swaps

CLIMATE CHANGE SCAM
Mark Carney, With U.N. Climate Action & Finance
Green New Deal Group Modelling After 2008 Bank Failure
Green Climate Fund, A GLOBAL Green New Deal
New Development Funds: Global Bait-And-Switch
NGOs Meddling In Carbon Tax Court Cases
Paris Accord, A Global Wealth Transfer Scheme

PHARMACEUTICAL LOBBYING
GAVI/Crestview Strategy Lobbying Ottawa
Motion M-132, Pharma Research For Canada And The World
Alberta Pharmaceutical Lobbying
Quebec Pharma Lobbying
Ontario Pharma Lobbying, Bill 160

LACK OF SCIENCE BEHIND PANDEMIC MEASURES
Pandemic Model Donors Have Conflict Of Interest
Virus Has Never Even Been Isolated
WHO Admits PCR Tests Are A Complete Fraud
WHO Admits Little Evidence Masks Work
Business Shut Downs Dependent On Corruption, Lobbying
Ottawa Lies About 2m “Social Distancing”
No Scientific Basis For Limiting Group Sizes
People Recover En Masse Without Vaccines

CENSORSHIP MEASURES
Social Media Collusion On “Pandemic” Narrative
Collusion To Promote Pro-Vaxx Narrative
Proposal To Introduce Laws Against “Misinformation”
Canadian Media Subsidized By Taxpayers, Biased
Fact-Checking Organizations Run By Political Operatives

Speakers at Davos complain that there is far too little trust between people and their leaders. Perhaps addressing some of these issues openly and honestly would help alleviate that. Or how about addressing the next one?

2. Aleksandr Lukashenko Alleges IMF Bribe

Belarus President Aleksandr Lukashenko publicly accused the World Bank and IMF (International Monetary Fund), of offering a bribe of almost $1 billion U.S. Dollars if he would crash the economy, and impose masks and lockdowns nationwide. Is any of this true?

Before any real trust can be established, honesty is necessary. Is Lukashenko lying, or did the IMF and World Bank manufacture this collapse?

3. Rise Of The Trust Brokers (3rd Parties)

Supposedly, it’s now too difficult and complex for people to manage their own personal data. Hiring 3rd parties to do thinking and decision making may be a better option. Alternatively, an automated system, or artificial intelligence can be put in control instead.

Who’s going to ensure that these 3rd parties are who they claim, and will honour personal information? How will that work with some sort of AI system? Too many questions need answering.

4. Stake Holder Capitalism New Way Of Life

The video is too large to upload here. “Stakeholder Capitalism” is what they want to replace “Shareholder Capitalism”, which is property rights. In short, this agenda is to water down (if not abolish altogether), private property. It’s Communism by any other name.

Don’t worry. You’ll own nothing, have no privacy, and your life will never be better. That predictive programming video came out a few years ago.

That being said, some valid points are made, such as corruption, debt and currency. However, it’s never pointed out that central banking (aided by corrupt politicians), enables such debt slavery. A country’s currency should never be held hostage to foreign private interests.

5. Advancing A New Social Contract

A “Social Contract” is often referred to as agreements within societies. This can refer to the expectation that Governments will provide certain protections and benefits, and citizens will behave in certain ways. Considering the underlying dishonesty of Officials in this “pandemic”, how can they be trusted now?

Historical reference. A social contract is also a reference to then-Ontario Premier Bob Rae imposing certain cuts in the public sector, in order to avoid job losses.

6. Tackling The Inequality Virus

The Covid-19 “pandemic” has also provided to allow a wealth redistribution to take place. Under the guise of fighting racial and gender inequality, these people want to forcibly make things more equal. They quite openly talk about reshaping society.

Also, apparently the virus is racist, since it isn’t killing off whites nearly to the same degree as blacks. Go figure. Perhaps it’s not nearly as deadly when there is equality in society.

7. UN’s Guterres: Pandemic A “Dress Rehearsal”

This “pandemic” is a dress rehearsal for other challenges coming. Antonio Guterres seems almost giddy that this has provided political cover to implement an agenda which could never have been achieved otherwise. If this wasn’t planned out, then it is crass opportunism.

He also says that he plans to vaccinate everyone, saying it’s the key to reopening society.

Interestingly, he also talks about virus mutations, which would render any existing vaccines completely worthless. Considering that WHO recommends AGAINST virus isolation, how would one know they were vaccinating against the correct strain?

Guterres also talks about debt relief, but deliberately omits that most countries participate in private central banking (aided by corrupt politicians). This, above all else, leads to the endless debt slavery that all pay for. Interesting that he talks about environmentally “borrowing” from children and grandchildren, but he leaves out how central banks do much the same thing.

8. Central Banking Is Predatory Lending

Governments and central banks have injected $11 trillion into the global economy, slashed interest rates and purchased large-scale assets to prevent financial collapse due to COVID-19. What monetary and fiscal stabilization policies that have emerged during the crisis should be sustained and scaled up, and how should competition policy be designed in an era of increasing concentration?
.
Speakers: Raghuram G. Rajan, Geoff Cutmore, Alex Cobham, Rain Newton-Smith
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The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

The description on the video is misleading. Most countries operate private central banks, which means they are forced to borrow — at interest — in order to fund their needs. $11 trillion was generated out of nothing, but now it’s considered debt. As a consequence, “assets” can now be bought off with artificially created wealth.

They float a solution — allowing borrowing at low rates — but it doesn’t address the corrupt system itself. This is not surprising at this point. Politicians and media talking heads frequently address a symptom (the debt), but never the disease (the monetary system). This is intentional.

9. Bonnie Henry: Not Based On Science

A rare moment of honesty from BC Provincial Health Officer Bonnie Henry. Despite a Province-wide ban on gatherings, she admits that none of this is based on science. There’s just vague references to models, a tacit admission that models are not proof or science. Also see TCN TV Network, for more information.

10. Other Articles On CV “Planned-emic”

The rest of the series is here. Many lies, lobbying, conflicts of interest, and various globalist agendas operating behind the scenes, obscuring the vile agenda called the GREAT RESET. The Gates Foundation finances: the WHO, the US CDC, GAVI, ID2020, John Hopkins University, Imperial College London, the Pirbright Institute, the BBC, and individual pharmaceutical companies. The International Health Regulations are legally binding. The media is paid off. The virus was never isolated, PCR tests are a fraud, as are forced masks, social bubbles, and 2m distancing.

Who’s Pulling Erin O’Toole’s Strings?

So who is Erin O’Toole, the Leader of the Conservative Party of Canada? What does he believe, and what does he stand for? Turns out, the answers are pretty bad. The CPC is just a parody of an opposition party (6uild 6ack 6etter is now 6uild 6ack “stronger“).

1. Important Links

https://twitter.com/erinotoole/status/1351658366406438914
https://www.conservative.ca/cpc/build-back-stronger/
O’Toole Supports Even More Draconian Measures
Walied Soliman, Sick Kids Toronto Director
Walied Soliman Wins Global Citizen Of The Year Award
O’Toole Lobbied By NCCM, Anti-Free Speech
O’Toole Lobbied By CIJA, Anti-Free Speech
Jeff Ballingall, Canada Proud
Erin O’Toole Pushing FIPA In House Of Commons
Full Text Of FIPA With China
CANZUK International Website
James Skinner’s LinkedIn Page
CPC On The Climate Change Agenda
O’Toole, Private Member’s Bill C-405
Lobbying By SNC Lavalin For Deferred Pros. Agreement
Aga Khan Lobbies O’Toole For Funding
https://twitter.com/DerekSloanCPC/status/1351314995133501443
Derek Sloan’s Petition e-2961

2. O’Toole Chief Of Staff Walied Soliman

Walied Soliman, O’Toole’s Chief of Staff, has been a Director of Sick Kids Hospital Toronto since 2012. Sick Kids is heavily funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. One has to wonder if that is why O’Toole is so supportive of restrictive measures and lockdowns in general.

Soliman was awarded “Global Citizen Of the Year” in 2019. He’s also part of the National Council of Canadian Muslims, which is pushing hate speech laws in Canada.

3. Ties To Anti-Free Speech Lobby

The National Council of Canadian Muslims, (NCCM) and the Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs, (CIJA), are just 2 groups working to rewrite the laws in Canada on hate speech. While this is marketed in a harmless manner, the devil’s in the details about what may be included.

4. Ties To Vaccine/Pandemic Industry

Why is O’Toole so vaccination happy? It could be the rampant pharmaceutical lobbying that has been going on, of all major parties. To the lay observer, it looks like he is fulfilling the wishes of special interests, instead of those of Canadians.

This is true with GAVI as well, which is also Gates funded. GAVI and Crestview Strategy lobbied the Office of the Official Opposition as well. At the time, this was Andrew Scheer. However, it seems doubtful that O’Toole’s stance will be any different.

5. Heenan Blaikie, Desmarais, Facebook

Before getting into Parliament, O’Toole worked for the law firm Heenan Blaikie (which is now defunct). It’s the same firm that Jean Chretien and Pierre Trudeau worked for. The Desmarais Family also had connections the the company.

In his duties, O’Toole also acted as a lobbyist for Facebook, trying to influence the Government of Stephen Harper — which he later became part of.

6. Jeff Ballingall, Canada Proud

O’Toole’s campaign was aided by Jeff Ballingall, and a group called Canada Proud. This is an NGO that tries to promote “conservative” politicians and movements. There are Provincial efforts as well, including Ontario Proud, which helped install Doug Ford into power. O’Toole was helped along by social media pros who got him more attention.

Side note: Ballingall works for The Post Millennial, which is owned by Matthew Azrieli. He is the grandson of the late David Azrieli, media mogul and billionaire.

7. FIPA, Selling Out Canada To China

Upon entering the House of Commons, O’Toole worked as a Parliamentary Secretary for the Minister of International Trade. His first major gig was pushing FIPA, an agreement which sold Canadian sovereignty to China for a minimum of 31 years. Even after all this time, there’s no indication O’Toole regrets his involvement. See this earlier review on FIPA.

8. CANZUK, Open Borders Agreement

CANZUK is an acronym (Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and United Kingdom). The group, CANZUK International, is in a compaign for a treaty that would open borders between those countries. More countries could eventually be added. James Skinner, the head of the group, also worked for the CPC, and it looks like CANZUK is in fact their creation.

O’Toole is on record supporting CANZUK, and future expansion as well. He gives a variety of reasons, depending on what the circumstances are.

9. Open Borders Immigration Agenda

Would O’Toole and the Conservatives reduce the hordes of people entering Canada each year? Would they do something about the large numbers of students and temporary workers who have pathways to extend? It seems most unlikely.

The true scale of immigration into Canada has been covered extensively on this site, so no need to rehash it here. But fair to say that O’Toole either lowballs it, or has no clue whatsoever.

10. Supporting Climate Change Agenda

Ottawa, ON – Dan Albas, Conservative Shadow Minister for Environment and Climate Change, released the following statement regarding Justin Trudeau’s plan to triple the Carbon Tax:

“Fighting climate change at home and around the world is an important goal that takes work. Canadians agree on the importance of protecting our environment and natural spaces, and it is an issue that our Party and Leader are passionate about.

“It’s shameful that the Liberals failed to properly consult provinces on their plan raise the Carbon Tax. The environment is an area of shared jurisdiction and Canada’s Conservatives will respect the jurisdiction of the provinces and territories by scrapping Trudeau’s Carbon Tax. If provinces want to use market mechanisms, other forms of carbon pricing, or regulatory measures, that is up to them.

“This week, Conservatives put forward a motion to stop the Liberals from raising taxes during the pandemic. Not only did the Liberals vote against our motion, but they are now raising the Carbon Tax even higher. This increase will mean that Canadians will pay more for groceries, home heating, and add up to 37.57 cents per litre to the cost of gas.

A moment of clarification here: O’Toole and the CPC don’t actually take issue with the climate change agenda itself. Instead, they limit their criticisms specifically to Carbon taxes.

The disingenuous nature of the Provinces “challenging” the Carbon taxes, while supporting the climate change agenda has also been covered here.

11. Weakening Protections On Worker Pensions

Although it ultimately went nowhere, O’Toole previously introduced Private Member’s Bill C-405, which would make it easier for bankrupt companies to transfer employee pensions instead of paying them out. Wonder where he got that idea from.

12. SNC Lavalin, Deferred Prosecution

Ever wonder why Conservatives were so tepid on SNC Lavalin getting their deferred prosecution agreement? Could be because they were also lobbied for it. Seems that “tough on crime” has its limits.

13. Aga Khan Foundation Canada

Aga Khan Foundation Canada (AKFC) is a registered charity that supports social development programs in Asia and Africa. As a member of the Aga Khan Development Network, AKFC works to address the root causes of poverty: finding and sharing effective and lasting solutions that help improve the quality of life for poor communities. Our programs focus on four core areas: health, education, rural development and building the capacity of non-governmental organizations.

In the year 2018, the Aga Khan Foundation received roughly $32 million from Canadian taxpayers. It’s a little disturbing to see Conservatives lobbied by this group as well, especially considering the grief they gave Trudeau over his winter vacation.

14. O’Toole Never Mentions Central Banking

From time to time, O’Toole will make noises about how Conservatives are better managers of money than Liberals. However, he never talks about private central banking, which is probably the biggest scam in history. He was in Parliament during the Bank of Canada case (so he presumably is familiar with the issue). But he will never talk about it openly.

15. Why Throw Derek Sloan Under The Bus?

Derek Sloan, a CPC MP, faces expulsion from his party for accepting a donation of $131 from a so-called “white supremacist”. Is that the real reason for this, or was O’Toole pressured by his pharma handlers after Sloan sponsored? Petition e-2961 referred to these vaccines as “human experimentation”.

Obviously O’Toole knows for sure, but the claim of a “racist donation” seems like a thinly veiled attempt to dump a politician who is actually critical of the vaccination agenda.

So who’s pulling Erin O’Toole’s strings? It seems everyone except the Canadian public.

IBC #13: BIS, Central Banks On Digital Currency Implementation

BIS, the Bank for International Settlements, is working towards implementing a digital currency that would replace cash. There doesn’t appear to be any ideological concerns against this. Instead, it becomes a matter of details.

1. More On The International Banking Cartel

For more on the banking cartel, check this page. The Canadian Government, like so many others, has sold out the independence and sovereignty of its monetary system to foreign interests. BIS, like its central banks, exceed their agenda and try to influence other social agendas. See who is really controlling things, and the common lies that politicians and media figures tell. Now, the bankers work with the climate mafia and pandemic pushers to promote their mutual goals of control and debt slavery.

2. Important Links

https://www.bis.org/press/p201009.htm
https://www.bis.org/publ/othp33.pdf
BIS Digital Currency Paper
BIS Video Promoting Digital Currency
Citi On Digital Currency (Video)
Digital Currency Discussion, India(Video)
Various Digital Currency Options
World Affairs Council On Digital Currency (Video)
Bank For International Settlements Innovation Hub
BIS on digital innovation options

3. BIS Working Our Details Of Digital Currency

Yet the world is changing. Even before Covid-19, cash use in payments was declining in some advanced economies. Commercially provided, fast and convenient digital payments have grown enormously in volume and diversity. To evolve and pursue their public policy objectives in a digital world, central banks are actively researching the pros and cons of offering a digital currency to the public (a “general purpose” central bank digital currency (CBDC)). Understanding of CBDCs has advanced significantly in the last few years. Published research, policy work and proofs-of-concept from central banks have gone a long way towards establishing the potential benefits and risks.

For the central banks contributing to this report, the common motivation for exploring a general purpose CBDC is its use as a means of payment. Providing cash to the public is a core responsibility of central banks and a public good. All the contributing central banks commit to continue providing cash as long as there is public demand. Yet a CBDC could provide a complementary central bank money to the public, supporting a more resilient and diverse domestic payment system. It might also offer opportunities not possible with cash while supporting innovation.

2.1 Payment motivations and challenges
2.1.1 Continued access to central bank money
In jurisdictions where access to cash is in decline, there is a danger that households and businesses will no longer have access to risk-free central bank money. Some central banks consider it an obligation to provide public access and that this access could be crucial for confidence in a currency. A CBDC could act like a “digital banknote” and could fulfil this obligation.

2.1.2 Resilience
Cash serves as a backup payment method to electronic systems if those networks cease to function. However, if access to cash is marginalised, it will be less useful as a backup method if the need arises. A CBDC system could act as an additional payment method, improving operational resilience. Compared to cash, a CBDC system might provide a better means to distribute and use funds in geographically remote locations or during natural disasters.

However, significant offline capabilities would need to be developed, both for the CBDC system and any dependencies (eg some availability of electricity for mobile devices). Counterfeiting and cyber risk present a challenge. Cash has sophisticated anti-counterfeiting features and large-scale issues rarely occur. Theoretically, a successful cyber attack on a digital CBDC system could quickly threaten a significant number of users and their confidence in the wider system (as it could for a large bank or payment service provider). Defending against cyber attacks will be made more difficult as the number of endpoints in a general purpose CBDC system will be significantly larger than those of current wholesale central bank systems.

References

  • Adrian, T and T Mancini Griffoli (2019): “The rise of digital money”, IMF FinTech Notes, no 19/001, July.
  • Auer, R and R Böhme (2020): “The technology of retail central bank digital currency”, BIS Quarterly Review,
    March, pp 85–100.
  • Auer, R, G Cornelli and J Frost (2020): Rise of the central bank digital currencies: drivers, approaches and
    technologies”, BIS Working Papers, no 880, August.
  • Auer, R, P Haene and H Holden (2020): Multi CBDC arrangements and the future of cross-border payments,
    BIS papers, forthcoming.
  • Bank of Canada (2020): Contingency planning for a central bank digital currency, February.
  • Bank of Canada and Monetary Authority of Singapore (2019): Enabling cross-border high value transfer
    using distributed ledger technologies, May.
  • Bank of England (2020): Central bank digital currency: opportunities, challenges and design, March.
  • Bank of Thailand and Hong Kong Monetary Authority (2020): Inthanon-LionRock: leveraging distributed
    ledger technology to increase efficiency in cross-border payments, January.
  • Bech, M and R Garratt (2017): “Central bank cryptocurrencies”, BIS Quarterly Review, September, pp 55–
    70.
  • Bindseil, U (2020): “Tiered CBDC and the financial system”, ECB Working Paper Series, no 2351, January.
  • Boar, C, H Holden and A Wadsworth (2020): “Impending arrival – a sequel to the survey on central bank
    digital currency”, BIS Papers, no 107, January.
  • Bossone, B (2001): “Should banks be narrowed?”, IMF Working Papers, WP/01/159, October.
  • Brunnermeier, M, H James and J-P Landau (2019): “The digitalization of money”, NBER Working Papers, no
    26300, September.
  • Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures (2018): Cross-border retail payments, February.
    ——— (2020): Enhancing cross-border payments: building blocks of a global roadmap, July.
  • Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures and Markets Committee (2018): Central bank digital
    currencies, March.
  • Committee on Payments and Market Infrastructures and World Bank Group (2020): Payment aspects of
    financial inclusion in the fintech era, April.
  • Committee on Payment and Settlement Systems (2003): The role of central bank money in payment
    systems, August.
  • European Central Bank and Bank of Japan (2019): Synchronised cross-border payments, June.
  • European Central Bank and Bank of Japan (2020): Balancing confidentiality and auditability in a distributed
    ledger environment, February.
  • Ferrari, M, A Mehl and L Stracca (2020): Central bank digital currency in the open economy, forthcoming.
    G7 Working Group on Stablecoins (2019): Investigating the impact of global stablecoins, October.
  • Kahn, C, F Rivadeneyra and R Wong (2018): “Should the central bank issue e-money?”, Bank of Canada Staff Working Paper, 2018-58, December.
  • Sveriges Riksbank (2018): The Riksbank’s e-krona project, report 2, October

This goes far beyond some academic theory. There has been serious research and study into issuing digital currency, and it has gone on for quite some time. The “pandemic” seems to be a pretext to push it further along.

Nice to see that some of the major risks are addressed, such as hacking, or system malfunction erasing financial information.

Also, this must be pointed out: most central banks are privately owned and/or controlled. This means that countries must borrow (at interest) in order to get money for day to day operations. Such a system is not necessary, but is enacted for the purposes of creating endless debt slavery. Politicians go along with this because they have no interest in the well being of their people.

4. The Fraud Of Private Central Banking

One of the reasons that digital currency is touted is supposedly to combat money laundering. Interesting, because private central banking (money borrowed at interest), is arguably the greatest financial fraud ever perpetuated. In this scheme, the only way countries can get money — created from nothing — is to borrow it at interest.

5. Digital Currency Openly Discussed

This discussion is hardly limited to BIS. Banks and financial institutions across the planet are talking about how to implement such a system, and have been doing so for many years.

A curious point: things like Bitcoin are promoted as a decentralized way to make transactions, yet banks talk about ways to centrally manage these.

6. Bank For Int’l Settlements Innovation Hub

Hub projects and topics will evolve over time, and the BIS has been working to identify areas of work for the Hub that reflect the innovation priorities of the central bank community and which could be scaled up through international cooperation. Topics under consideration for the work agenda include central bank digital currencies, global stablecoins, payment innovations, the impact of big tech on financial intermediation, regtech and suptech, fast-paced electronic markets, and digitalisation of trade finance.

What does the BIS Innovation Hub do?
The mandate of the BIS Innovation Hub is to identify and develop in-depth insights into critical trends in financial technology of relevance to central banks, to explore the development of public goods to enhance the functioning of the global financial system, and to serve as a focal point for a network of central bank experts on innovation. It complements the already well established cooperation within the BIS-hosted committees.

Digital currency is just one of the things that BIS is working on. The group wants to be at the forefront of the trends that are emerging in financing and payment processing.

7. Privacy Element Missing From Discussion

What about people who want to make business transactions without there being a record for many years? Not everyone is okay with every food or minor purchase being a record available for others to see. Although a growing population seems unconcerned with such things, there is the inherent loss of privacy.

And what about the loss of anonymity or choice when it comes to association, or viewpoints? Is it not easier to connect a person (and their public statements), to their finances? If they happen to hold “incorrect” views, what’s to stop there digital currency from being erased? What’s to prevent institutions from refusing to do business with them? For a concrete example, banks these days are promoting forced diversity and globalism, although many are opposed to it.

Although this sounds farfetched, what’s to stop a Chinese style “social credit” system from making someone’s life impossible to live? Such a thing is possible then finance and identity cannot be separated.

IBC #10(G): Federal Reserve Joins NGFS; Sustainable Banking Network; Climate-Related Financial Disclosures; IFC Green Banking Academy

The Federal Reserve, the largest central bank in the world, has announced it is joining the Network of Central Banks & Supervisors for Greening the Financial System.

Network For Greening The Financial System
Sustainable Banking Network
Task Force On Climate Related Financial Disclosures
IFC – Green Banking Academy

1. More On The International Banking Cartel

For more on the banking cartel, check this page. The Canadian Government, like so many others, has sold out the independence and sovereignty of its monetary system to foreign interests. BIS, like its central banks, exceed their agenda and try to influence other social agendas. See who is really controlling things, and the common lies that politicians and media figures tell. Now, the bankers work with the climate mafia and pandemic pushers to promote their mutual goals of control and debt slavery.

2. Debunking The Climate Change Scam

The entire climate change industry, (and yes, it is an industry) is a hoax perpetrated by the people in power, run by international bankers. Plenty has also been covered on the climate scam, the propaganda machine in action, and some of the court documents in Canada. Carbon taxes are just a small part of the picture, and conservatives are intentionally sabotaging their court cases.

3. U.S. Federal Reserve Joins The NGFS

The Federal Reserve Board announced on Tuesday that it has formally joined the Network of Central Banks and Supervisors for Greening the Financial System, or NGFS, as a member. By bringing together central banks and supervisory authorities from around the world, NGFS supports the exchange of ideas, research, and best practices on the development of environment and climate risk management for the financial sector. The Board began participating in NGFS discussions and activities more than a year ago.

“As we develop our understanding of how best to assess the impact of climate change on the financial system, we look forward to continuing and deepening our discussions with our NGFS colleagues from around the world,” said Federal Reserve Board Chair Jerome H. Powell.

On December 15, the Federal Reserve announced it was joining the NGFS, the Network for Greening the Financial System. This makes is the last major central bank to do so. The rationale for all of this is that stopping climate change is necessary to stabilizing monetary systems.

4. Sustainable Banking Network

The Sustainable Banking Network (SBN) is a unique, voluntary community of financial sector regulatory agencies and banking associations from emerging markets committed to advancing sustainable finance in line with international good practice. It is a platform for knowledge sharing and capacity building that facilitates the mobilization of practical support for members to design and implement national sustainable finance policies and principles.

The 41 member-countries represent US$43 trillion (86 percent) of the total banking assets in emerging markets. SBN members are committed to moving their financial sectors towards sustainability, with the twin goals of improved Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) risk management (including disclosure of climate risks) and increased capital flows to activities with positive climate impact.

This is a group of banking associations and regulatory agencies who fully support the climate change agenda. They want to work it into every aspect of banking.

5. Climate Related Financial Disclosures

Climate change poses both risks and opportunities for business, now and in the future. As the Earth’s temperature rises, increasingly common natural disasters are disrupting ecosystems and human health, causing unanticipated business losses, and threatening assets and infrastructure. In response, governments and private sector entities are considering a range of options for reducing global emissions, which could result in disruptive changes across economic sectors and regions in the near term.

Currently, however, investors, lenders, and insurers don’t have a clear view of which companies will endure or even flourish as the environment changes, regulations evolve, new technologies emerge, and customer behavior shifts — and which companies are likely to struggle.

Without reliable climate-related financial information, financial markets cannot price climate-related risks and opportunities correctly and may potentially face a rocky transition to a low-carbon economy, with sudden value shifts and destabilizing costs if industries must rapidly adjust to the new landscape.

The goal here, as the name implies, is to make “carbon and environmental costs” a part of all major business decisions, and to have the impacts released to the public. Think of it as a social credit score, just with carbon credits.

6. Int’l Finance Corp: Green Banking Academy

What is IFC’s Green Banking Academy?
Our Green Banking Academy (IFC-GBAC) is a knowledge and capacity-building initiative of IFC’s Financial Institutions Group. IFC has more than 20 years’ experience in the climate business.

What do we offer?
IFC-GBAC supports Latin American and Caribbean banks with specialized advice and training to accelerate their green transformation, strengthen their businesses, and enable them to contribute to a more sustainable world.

IFC-GBAC is focused on the knowledge needs of banks and bankers. Academic content is customized to specific types of banking professionals, including C-level executives, product specialists, credit and risk officers, the sales force, and more.

Climate change is not only a global challenge; it is also a business opportunity.
In Latin America and the Caribbean alone, climate investment is estimated to have a potential value of $2.6 trillion through 2030. IFC’s Green Finance Latin-America Report explored the challenges and opportunities in the space.

So-called “climate finance“, is the ideology of sinking money into green projects, regardless of whether or not they actually work. Industries that they don’t ideologically agree with are to be allowed to die off.

7. World Bank Partnerships

The World Bank Group works in every major area of development. We provide a wide array of financial products and technical assistance, and we help countries share and apply innovative knowledge and solutions to the challenges they face.

Sounds so harmless, doesn’t it? The World Bank is involved in financing projects across the globe. Many of them involve the climate change agenda, and transferring wealth under various eco-programs.

The big take away from all of this is that there is no real separation between the banking system, and the climate change movement. In fact, bankers have realized that there is some real money to be made, all under the guise of environmentalism.

Green New Deal Group, Taking Lessons From The 2008 Banking Bailout

Think recent public efforts to convince the public to act on climate change just happened? No, they are the result of years of planning, and from an organization called Green New Deal Group.

There is some real strategy at play here. Divert people’s attention with protests, riots, and public movements, and the agenda can be quietly passed. After all, how much coverage do the various treaties we sign (and bills we pass), actually get?

1. More On The International Banking Cartel

For more on the banking cartel, check this page. The Canadian Government, like so many others, has sold out the independence and sovereignty of its monetary system to foreign interests. BIS, like its central banks, exceed their agenda and try to influence other social agendas. See who is really controlling things, and the common lies that politicians and media figures tell. Now, the bankers work with the climate mafia and pandemic pushers to promote their mutual goals of control and debt slavery.

2. Debunking The Climate Change Scam

The entire climate change industry, (and yes, it is an industry) is a hoax perpetrated by the people in power, run by international bankers. Plenty has also been covered on the climate scam, the propaganda machine in action, and some of the court documents in Canada. Carbon taxes are just a small part of the picture, and conservatives are intentionally sabotaging their court cases.

3. Important Links

Green New Deal Group Main Page
https://archive.is/ncRvA
WayBack Machine Archives

About Us: Green New Deal Group
https://archive.is/rxRpv
WayBack Machine Archive

https://greennewdealgroup.org/2008/04/
Guardian 2008: We Wanted A Green New Deal
https://greennewdealgroup.org/2008/07/
Guardian 2008 Article On The Triple Crunch
https://greennewdealgroup.org/2009/03/
Gordon Brown Calls For Global Green New Deal
https://greennewdealgroup.org/2009/07/
The Ecologist: Bailed Out Banks Should Fund GND
Green New Deal Group Budget Proposal
Network For Greening The Financial System

AOC: This Is Our World War II
Mr. Reagan: The Brains Behind AOC
NBC On Sunrise Movement

4. About Green New Deal Group

As in past times of crises, disparate groups have come together to propose a new solution to an epochal challenge. The Green New Deal Group drew inspiration from the ambition of President Roosevelt’s comprehensive response to the Great Depression to propose a modernised version, a ‘Green New Deal’ in 2008. It was designed to kick start a rapid transition to a new economy shaped to prevent a climate breakdown and transform a failed financial system. The Green New Deal will power a renewables revolution, create thousands of green-collar jobs across the economy and rein in the distorting and socially-destructive power of the finance sector while making more low-cost capital available for pressing priorities.

Meeting since early 2007, the membership of the Green New Deal Group is drawn to reflect a wide range of expertise relating politics and economics, and the climate, nature and inequality crises. The views and recommendations of the Green New Deal series of reports, are those of the group writing in their individual capacities.

The Green New Deal Group is, in alphabetical order:
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Larry Elliott, Economics Editor of the Guardian, Colin Hines, Co-Director of Finance for the Future, former head of Greenpeace International’s Economics Unit, Jeremy Leggett, founder and Chairman of Solarcentury and SolarAid, Clive Lewis, Labour MP, Caroline Lucas, Green Party MP, Richard Murphy, Professor of Practice, City University, Director Tax Research LLP, Ann Pettifor, Director, Policy Research in Macroeconomics (PRIME), Charles Secrett, Advisor on Sustainable Development, former Director of Friends of the Earth, Andrew Simms, Co-Director, New Weather Institute, Coordinator, The Rapid Transition Alliance, Assistant Director, Scientists for Global Responsibility. Geoff Tily Senior Economist, TUC

Those are the people who make up the Green New Deal Group. In essence, this is the brainchild behind the eco movement in recent years.

5. GNDG Used To Reboot After 2008 Crash

In the coverage of the causes and likely future effects of the credit crunch, such grim parallels are becoming commonplace. But it’s now time to move from problems to solutions, and here too the Depression can form a useful reference point. Franklin Roosevelt’s action programme for dealing with the aftermath of the late 1920s credit crunch was threefold: first, strictly regulate the cause of the problem – the greedy and feckless finance sector; second, get people back to work, and generate business opportunities by a New Deal. This invested billions of dollars in training, better working conditions and a huge range of infrastructural projects such as highways, dams and bridges. Finally, fund this in part by an increase in taxes on big business and the rich – a measure which also had the positive effect of dramatically decreasing inequality.

Today the re-regulation of finance is even being discussed among consenting free market adults in the columns of the Financial Times. My colleague, environmentalist Colin Hines, has fleshed out the details of a Green New Deal which could help re-boot the economy after the credit crash, while putting serious money into addressing climate change.

As a result of the 2008 crash, this group decided that it would make a great opportunity to completely remake their economy, and deal with climate change in the first place. They reasoned that if banks were worth pouring trillions into, then the environment must be as well. The argument does have some merit to it.

Notice that it’s compared to the “New Deal” that Franklin Delano Roosevelt launched in the 1930s. This is not the last time that comparison will come up.

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez introduced the U.S. public to the Green New Deal in 2019, just after taking office. It wasn’t some brainstorm she had, but had been drawn up many years ago. The YouTuber, Mr. Reagan, did address that AOC was a puppet, but he missed how far back the plan went.

6. GND Group To Solve “Triple Crunch”

Can I trust the bank to look after my money? Clickety clack. How much has my house fallen in value? Clickety clack. Will high fuel prices mean I can’t keep my car on the road? Can I afford to buy enough food for the family? Clickety clack. Will I lose my job, and why is everyone making me paranoid about climate change when there’s nothing I can do about it? Clickety, clickety clack … and then back to the beginning. The “triple crunch” of a credit-fuelled financial crisis, accelerating climate change and soaring energy prices – how did we get into this mess? In the face of so many simultaneous crises, we all have legitimate questions for the governments that allowed us to sleepwalk into this situation.

The Green New Deal was dreamed up as a way to solve multiple problems, such as: (a) financial crisis; (b) climate change; and (c) energy prices all at once.

While it’s nice to see the financial crisis addressed, this group seems to miss the elephant in the room: central banking. It’s that the Government legislates in such a way that the U.S. is forced to borrow — at interest — from the Federal Reserve, a private organization. Do they not know about any of this?

7. History Of The Green New Deal

Where the Green New Deal came from
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The idea of a Green New Deal first arose at the time of 2007-2008 financial crisis roughly simultaneously in the us and the UK. New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman wrote an article in January 2007 that suggested the approach. The same year the UK-based Green New Deal group formed, independently developing and publishing the first full proposal for a Green New Deal in July 2008. The group’s report laid out the architecture of the Green New Deal for the first time: combining reining in the power of big finance and transforming the way that government manages the economy with a plan to transform the economy and society to meet the challenges of climate change. The group also published several subsequent reports developing the idea over the following years. The Green New Deal was then taken up by the Green Party in the UK, by Green parties across Europe and by the United Nations Environment Programme. In 2018, the idea was revived by us senator Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and the Sunrise Movement in the US following a meeting between a member of her team and UK Green New Deal group member Ann Pettifor. When AOC published a bill for the Green New Deal with Senator Edward Markey in February 2019 the idea caught on around the world.

Far from being some sort of a revolutionary, AOC was simply the latest person assigned to run with the agenda. While it is easy to mock the GND outright, it seems that elements of it are embedded within Agenda 2030 and the Great Reset.

8. UK PM Gordon Brown Promotes GND

Moving the UK to a low-carbon economy will create 400,000 new jobs over the next eight years, Gordon Brown has told a summit in London.
.
The prime minister called for an international “green new deal” to boost the environmental sector and help lift the global economy out of recession.
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This will increase “confidence and certainty”, he added.
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But unions and environmental groups called for more funding for green projects, along with better regulation.
The government has set a target of reducing greenhouse gas emissions by 80% from 1990 levels by 2050.

When he was Prime Minister of the UK, Gordon Brown openly called for a “Green New Deal” to rebuild the country after the banking collapse.

9. Green Quantitative Easing

As the Bank of England moves closer towards announcing an unprecedented third round of ‘Quantitative Easing’, experts are calling for this newly created money to be used more productively and effectively to achieve key social and environmental objectives. During the last round of Quantitative Easing (’QE’) the Bank of England purchased £275bn worth of government bonds with money it newly created. As the Bank of England prepares the ground to inject a likely £50bn to £75bn into the economy, the UK’s Green Party MP, Caroline Lucas, and Southampton University banking expert Professor Richard Werner, are calling for this money injection to be used for green projects that directly improve the environment and long-term quality of life, while creating many new jobs. Said Professor Richard A. Werner, Director of the Centre for Banking, Finance and Sustainable Development at the University of Southampton: “Many people would like money creation to be used to help the wider economy directly and to implement some badly needed green projects that would enhance the sustainability of the economy and improve the environment—as well as create new jobs.”

Green Quantitative Easing Paper

In 2012, Richard Werner submitted a proposal for “green quantitative easing”. In short, it would still involve printing off large sums of money. However, it would be spent on environmental causes, instead of being poured into banks.

10. GND Group UK Budget Submission

A Green New Deal Group briefing, The Green New Deal: Securing the Future, was sent to the Chancellor ahead of the March 2020 budget, with a letter signed by MPs from all the main opposition parties.

As the briefing, written by Green New Deal Group member Richard Murphy sets out, the Green New Deal Group have long argued that it is prudent for government to borrow (by issuing bonds) to invest in the transformation of our infrastructure and businesses while interest rates are low. The briefing shows how such government borrowing could be financed in a way that also creates a safe place for the nation’s pensions and savings, by making simple changes to existing tax incentives. Much of the £70bn saved annually in ISAs could then be invested in government-backed green bonds at an interest rate of 1.85% (the UK government’s current average cost of borrowing) and a quarter of the £100bn currently invested in pensions could be directed into Green New Deal investment.

A budget proposal was submitted to the UK Government in March 2020. It was written by the Green New Deal Group, and was able to get the signatures of many politicians.

11. Protests/Riots Partly Entirely For Show

In recent years, there have been loud environmental movements going on across the Western World. There have been efforts to shut down industries, pipelines, and society altogether. These people seem oblivious to the fact that shutting down oil (for example), would lead to a drastic reduction in their living standards.

However, this is a sleight of hand. Even though politicians appear to be turned off by the antics of violent protesters, they work behind the scenes to ensure that the goals are enacted anyway. Treaties such as Agenda 21, Agenda 2030, and the Great Reset are designed to achieve many of the same goals.

BOLD Like A Leopard wrote a great piece on some of the forces acting behind the scenes. It’s well worth the time to read.

Now we look at the bigger picture. While the public is distracted by very visible protests over environmental issues, just quietly implement them behind the scenes. People likely won’t notice. They are too focused on radicals who seem hell bent on destabilization, though those are distractions.

12. Bankers Run Climate Change Movement

This will seem a cruel twist, but central banks are heavily behind the green movement. One such group is the Network for Greening the Financial System, which currently boasts 75 members.

Hard to be part of the resistance when the financial sector supports, (or at least appears to support), green initiatives. It’s unclear, however, if the banks simply co-opted the movement, or whether they were always running things from behind the scenes.

WEF Great Reset: Banking Cartel; Climate Change; End Of Private Property; Privacy; Guns

At 5:10 in this video, Trudeau says that Canada will be giving 50% of the doses of vaccine it pays for to the 3rd World. Motion M-132 really was about financing drugs for the entire world.

1. Canadian Politicians Connected To WEF

Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in Economics, University of Calgary. 2002, Leader of the Opposition; co-founded Conservative Party and won party leadership; 2006, Prime Minister of Canada. Recipient of awards: Woodrow Wilson Award for Public Service; first Canadian to be awarded B’nai Brith Presidential Gold Medallion for Humanitarianism (2008).

Andrew Sheer is a Canadian politician serving as the Member of Parliament for Regina-Qu’Appelle since 2004 and as the leader of the conservative party and leader of the official opposition since 2017. He was one of the youngest MPs when he was first elected and his vision and leadership have earned him the continued confidence to be re-elected.

Build Back Stronger
The Liberals want to “build back better.” Conservatives will “build back stronger.”
We are facing the greatest economic crisis of our lifetime.
Canada’s Conservatives led by Erin O’Toole will bring back certainty and stability.
The Liberal agenda is to launch a risky experiment with Canada’s economy.
Justin Trudeau says, “We are all in this together.” But, under the Liberals, Canada is more divided than ever before.
With the Liberals, it’s the haves over the have-nots.
It’s Bay Street over Main Street.
It’s those with a salary, benefits, and a pension over those without.
It’s those with Liberal connections over the outsiders who have to play by the rules.
Instead, Erin O’Toole’s Conservatives will fight for you and your family, and the countless Canadians left behind by the Trudeau Liberal government.
.
Sign below if you want to build back stronger!

Canadian Member of Parliament. Has served in Cabinet as a Minister of State in the government of Stephen Harper. Has also managed the sponsored research portfolio for one of Canada’s top research intensive universities. Has over a decade of experience in managing and commercializing intellectual property, and in management consulting. Named one of Canada’s Top 100 Most Powerful Women, Women’s Executive Network. Twice named as Parliamentarian of the Year – Rising Star, Maclean’s Magazine.

Journalist and author. Began career as a Ukraine-based stringer; went on to hold senior positions at the Globe and Mail, the Financial Times and Thomson Reuters. First elected as a Member of Parliament in November 2013, was appointed International Trade Minister in November 2015, Minister of Foreign Affairs in January 2017 and Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Intergovernmental Affairs in November 2019. Has written two books: “Sale of the Century” (2000) and “Plutocrats” (2012).‎ In 2018, recognised as Foreign Policy’s Diplomat of the Year and awarded the Eric M. Warburg Award by Atlantik-Brücke. Speaks Russian, Ukrainian, Italian, French and English. Member of the Board of Trustees of the World Economic Forum.

Bachelor’s in Administrative Studies, York University, MBA, University of Windsor. Certified Management Accountant. Formerly: several years with the Ford Motor Company of Canada; Privy Councillor and Parliamentary Secretary to Prime Minister Paul Martin; Critic for Public Works and Government Services, the Treasury Board, International Trade, Natural Resources, and Small Business and Tourism. Member of Parliament for Mississauga-Malton; November 2015, appointed Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development. Former: Adjunct Lecturer, Master of Public Service programme, University of Waterloo; Distinguished Visiting Professor, Ted Rogers School of Management, Ryerson University. Former director of social and cultural organizations within the non-profit sector. Recipient of numerous awards recognizing work in promoting diversity in communities.

1988, Bachelor’s in Economics, Harvard University; 1993, Master’s in Economics and 1995, Doctorate in Economics, Oxford University. Thirteen years with Goldman Sachs in London, Tokyo, New York, Toronto. 2003-04, Deputy Governor, Bank of Canada. 2004-08, Senior Associate Deputy Minister of Finance. 2008-13, Governor of the Bank of Canada. Since July 2013, Governor of the Bank of England. Chairman, Financial Stability Board (FSB); Member: Board, Bank for International Settlements and Chairman; Group of Thirty; Board of Trustees, World Economic Forum.

Carney isn’t officially a politician, but he may as well be, considering the many roles he plays.

https://www.weforum.org/people/stephen-harper
https://www.weforum.org/people/andrew-scheer
https://www.conservative.ca/cpc/build-back-stronger/
https://www.weforum.org/people/michelle-rempel
https://www.weforum.org/people/chrystia-freeland
https://weforum.org/people/navdeep-bains
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/authors/mark-carney
https://www.weforum.org/people/jagmeet-singh

2. More On The International Banking Cartel

For more on the banking cartel, check this page. The Canadian Government, like so many others, has sold out the independence and sovereignty of its monetary system to foreign interests. BIS, like its central banks, exceed their agenda and try to influence other social agendas. See who is really controlling things, and the common lies that politicians and media figures tell. Now, the bankers work with the climate mafia and pandemic pushers to promote their mutual goals of control and debt slavery.

3. Debunking The Climate Change Scam

The entire climate change industry, (and yes, it is an industry) is a hoax perpetrated by the people in power, run by international bankers. Plenty has also been covered on the climate scam, the propaganda machine in action, and some of the court documents in Canada. Carbon taxes are just a small part of the picture, and conservatives are intentionally sabotaging their court cases.

4. Other Articles On CV “Planned-emic”

The rest of the series is here. Many lies, lobbying, conflicts of interest, and various globalist agendas operating behind the scenes, obscuring the “Great Reset“. The Gates Foundation finances: the WHO, the US CDC, GAVI, ID2020, John Hopkins University, Imperial College London, the Pirbright Institute, the BBC, and individual pharmaceutical companies. Also: there is little to no science behind what our officials are doing; they promote degenerate behaviour; the Australian Department of Health admits the PCR tests don’t work; the US CDC admits testing is heavily flawed; and The International Health Regulations are legally binding. See here, here, and here. The media is paid off, and our democracy is thoroughly compromised, as shown: here, here, here, and here.

5. Great Reset To Abolish Private Property

A large part of the Great Reset is abolishing real private property rights, at least for the average person. The Reset has been openly discussed for a long time, and they aren’t even bothering to hide their agenda anymore.

Beyond physical property, this refers to money as well. Overhauling the monetary system, and removing physical cash means much less (or none), control for people over their own wealth.

The World Economic Forum (and its participants), want people to view property not as theirs, but as the community’s. This is Marxism.

6. “Stakeholder Capitalism” Being Pushed

The concept of stakeholder capitalism has been gaining traction against the prevailing shareholder-primacy model of profit maximization. As the World Economic Forum’s founder, Klaus Schwab, asked in a recent editorial: “What kind of capitalism do we want”?

Profits are not the sole purpose of a business. Let us remind ourselves that corporations exist to solve problems and provide services. If they are successful at doing this, shareholder long-term returns can increase, as society in general is better served.

The debate regarding the role of stakeholders within a firm is, primarily, a governance debate. As in most challenges that require robust leadership to change the way we live, work and interact, transformation starts from the top. Corporate governance sits at the heart of this – and for this reason, the World Economic Forum has recently published a framework structured around seven pillars:

These people are communists, but want to make it less obvious. Consequently, they refer to property owners as “shareholders”, and the public at large as “stakeholders”. The focus is on converting from a shareholder economy to a stakeholder one.

7. Great Reset & Digital Cooperation

A lot of what is talked about is access to the internet for more and more of the population. While this sounds fine, there are areas that are quite alarming. These include the ever ambiguous “trust and safety” provisions, laid out in the Digital Cooperation Roadmap.

Terrorist groups and violent extremists have exploited the Internet and social media to cause harm in both the digital and physical worlds. Cyberattacks and disinformation campaigns targeting election infrastructure, political parties and politicians are undermining political participation, as well as the legitimacy of essential institutions, while sowing discontent and mistrust. States and non-State actors are rapidly increasing their cyber capabilities and developing increasingly sophisticated cyber arsenals. Nevertheless, close to half of all countries in the world do not have a Computer Emergency Response Team, which would give them the organizational and technological capacity to respond to cyberthreats.

Over the past few years, important efforts have been under way to address the rising threats to the online world. Encouraging voluntary efforts have been seen, including the Paris Call for Trust and Security in Cyberspace, the Global Forum on Cyber Expertise, the Global Commission on the Stability of Cyberspace and the Contract for the Web, many of which are multi-stakeholder, as well as initiatives on specific issues, such as the Christchurch Call to Action to address terrorist and violent extremist narratives. The initiatives have helped to bring about important progress for multi-stakeholder engagement. However, these efforts are not yet universal, and their reach, though broad in some cases, does not yet cover large swathes of the world.

Of course, everyone supports free speech. However, there needs to be some global regulations, such as digital cooperation, to manage it all.

Along with the dilution of free speech, one can expect privacy to be eroded as well. After all, you can’t hunt down people to cut off their freedom if you don’t know who they are.

8. WEF Great Reset & Digital Identity

At the World Economic Forum’s Annual Meeting 2018 in Davos, a diverse group of public and private stakeholders committed to shared cooperation on advancing good, user-centric digital identities. The Platform for Good Digital Identity seeks to advance global activities towards digital identities that are collaborative and put the user interest at the center: e.g. they are fit for purpose, inclusive, useful, secure, and offers choice to individuals. It will do so by advancing the Identity Coalitions Network: the learning and action network of organizations that implement Good ID solutions that are human centric and collaborative, by:
.
– Mapping digital identity coalitions advancing digital identity
.
– Encouraging shared learnings and new coalitions through a global action network
.
– Focusing on practitioners implementing user-centric use cases collaboratively: e.g. e-KYC, payments, health credentials, safe work, safe mobility, etc.
.
– Creating a digital identity implementation guidance for current and future coalitions

Well, the digital ID system will make it easier to eliminate cash, since everyone will be hooked into the financial system electronically. No word on people being microchipped, but that will probably come up later.

The other benefit (from their perspective), is that it becomes much easier to erase and financially cripple dissidents if they are completely dependent on the electronic systems.

9. Central Bankers Support Great Reset

Taking place from 16-20 Nov, the Pioneers of Change Summit is happening as the news is full of optimistic reports about vaccines for COVID-19. If there is light at the end of the tunnel, what needs to happen next to get economies back on their feet and make the transformations needed to cope with future pandemics and climate change – and to make the benefits of scientific advances available to all?

Christine Lagarde, head of the ECB, (European Central Bank), appeared on the Pioneers of Change podcast.

10. Central Banks Pushing Digital Currency

The decline of cash use in western economies has accelerated due to COVID-19. Meanwhile, central bank digital currencies are emerging, potentially upending the existing global economic hierarchy.

Lockdowns limit physical interactions and naturally reduce physical cash use. But there also credible concerns that paper money can transmit the virus. Research has shown that the average European banknote plays host to around 26,000 colonies of bacteria. The human influenza virus can survive on a banknote for up to 17 days; with one-dollar and five-dollar bills changing hands more than 100 times per year on average, the risk during a global pandemic is considerable.

Who then can blame the People’s Bank of China (PBOC) when it announced in February that it would be destroying cash collected in high-risk environments, such as public transport, markets or in hospitals?

China is not alone. Deutsche Bank Research has tracked almost 20 digital currency projects led by central banks across all regions globally. Meanwhile, the private banking sector has also launched multiple initiatives, such as the R3 consortium, or in India, the Blockchain Infrastructure Company.

Using the “pandemic” to convert to cashless system had been decried for a long time as a conspiracy theory. Now, it is quite openly admitted, but advocates just put a different spin on it.

11. Central Banks Support Climate Hoax

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2020/02/fossil-fuel-monetary-policy-economics-reassessment/
https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2015/01/financial-policymakers-climate-change/

In a 2015 speech, Mark Carney, the outgoing governor of the Bank of England, sparked a debate about whether monetary policymakers should look beyond the horizon of the business and credit cycles to ensure financial stability in light of the risks posed by climate change. More recently, European Central Bank President Christine Lagarde has said that she wants the ECB to tackle climate change, in addition to its traditional price-stability remit.

The climate threats to financial stability that central bankers worry about could arise not only from increasingly frequent and severe natural disasters, but also from the shift away from fossil fuels as a source of energy. That transition ultimately would turn reserves of oil, natural gas, and coal into stranded assets, jeopardizing the financial health of corporations, insurers, and other financial institutions that are exposed to fossil fuels.

The overall exposure of advanced economies such as the United Kingdom or those of the European Union to fossil fuels may appear to be relatively small. Nonetheless, we should not underestimate the systemic risk posed by stranded assets – after all, the 2008 global financial crisis was triggered by developments in the relatively small subprime mortgage market in the United States. And, for fossil-fuel exporters, stranded-asset risks are undeniably larger. The collapse in oil prices that started in June 2014 provided a recent stark reminder of the risks posed by excessive dependence on fossil fuels.

In addition, central banks’ response to the risk of stranded assets may influence how fossil-fuel exporters invest their wealth. Many oil exporters have accumulated vast financial assets. These countries’ strategic allocation of such assets is all the more important given the mounting risks to their main source of wealth. By looking beyond the business-cycle horizon, central banks can play a critical role in facilitating these countries’ investments in non-fossil-fuel assets.

In the face of the challenge posed by climate change, the focus of monetary policy often seems very short term. Central bankers must break this “curse of horizons” and take decisive steps to address fossil-fuel-related risks. They need to reflect on and communicate the existential threat of stranded reserves and capital, advocate the adoption of appropriate structural policies, pursue a suitable interest-rate policy, and provide supportive financial policies to encourage both economic diversification and changes in strategic asset allocation. Combating climate change while maintaining global financial stability requires nothing less.

A question has to be asked here: have the bankers simply infiltrated and hijacked the environment movement? Or have they always played a role, even if behind the scenes?

Instead of simply ripping off the public under the guise of fiscal policy, now it’s done under the pretense of stopping climate change.

12. WEF Interested In Gun Control

Canada’s Liberal government unveiled proposals on Tuesday to tighten already tough gun control laws to address a spike in crimes involving firearms, including a deadly attack on a mosque last year.

The measures include enhanced background checks on people seeking to buy firearms, especially those with a history of violence. They also would oblige retailers to maintain adequate records of inventories and sales.

The World Economic Forum took notice of Bill C-71, introduced in 2018 to create a backdoor long gun registry, and to make it harder to own guns. In fact, WEF publishes many articles on the topic of guns, and gun control.

13. WEF’s Predicted Dystopian Paradise

You’ll own nothing, and you’ll be happy.
Can’t really top that.

This has nothing to do with a virus. It is, and has always been, about implementing much larger social changes. Everything in the mainstream media is a lie.